Iowa Cubs

Last updated
Iowa Cubs
Founded in 1969
Des Moines, Iowa
Iowa Cubs Logo.svg IowaCubsCap.png
Team logoCap insignia
Minor league affiliations
Class Triple-A (1969–present)
League Pacific Coast League (1998–present)
ConferenceAmerican Conference
DivisionNorthern Division
Previous leagues
American Association (1969–1997)
Major league affiliations
Team Chicago Cubs (1981–present)
Previous teams Chicago White Sox (1976–1980)
Houston Astros (1975)
Chicago White Sox (1973–1974)
Oakland Athletics (1969–1972)
Minor league titles
League titles (1)1993
Conference titles (1)2004
Division titles (8)
  • 1973
  • 1993
  • 1997
  • 1998
  • 2001
  • 2004
  • 2008
  • 2019
Team data
NicknameIowa Cubs (1982–present)
Previous names
Iowa Oaks (1969–1981)
ColorsBlue, red, white
            
MascotCubbie Bear
Ballpark Principal Park (2004–present)
Previous parks
Sec Taylor Stadium (1969–2004)
Owner(s)/
Operator(s)
Raccoon Baseball, Inc.
Manager Marty Pevey
General ManagerSam Bernabe [1]

The Iowa Cubs are a Minor League Baseball team of the Pacific Coast League (PCL) and the Triple-A affiliate of the Chicago Cubs. They are located in Des Moines, Iowa, and play their home games at Principal Park, which opened in 2004. The team was originally known as the Iowa Oaks when it was established as a member of the Triple-A American Association in 1969. The Cubs took on the moniker of their major league affiliate in 1982. They joined the PCL in 1998. Their only league title in franchise history is the 1993 American Association championship.

Contents

History

Iowa Oaks (1969–1981)

Iowa Oaks logo during White Sox affiliation IowaOaks.png
Iowa Oaks logo during White Sox affiliation

Triple-A Minor League Baseball came to Iowa's capital city in 1969, as the Iowa Oaks of the American Association began play as an affiliate of the Oakland Athletics. [2] They played their home games at Sec Taylor Stadium, which opened in 1947 and was located at the confluence of the Des Moines and Raccoon Rivers. Many future Major League Baseball stars such as sluggers Bill McNulty, Harold Baines, Pat Tabler, and 1971 Cy Young and MVP Award winning left-handed pitcher Vida Blue spent time with the Oaks. The A's farm club experienced winning seasons in 1970 and 1971, but third and second-place finishes kept them out of the playoffs. [3] [4]

The Oaks became the top affiliate of the Chicago White Sox in 1973. They won the East Division that season with an 83–53 record, earning a spot in the best-of-seven American Association championship playoffs, [5] but they were defeated by the Tulsa Oilers, 4–3. [6] Manager Joe Sparks won the American Association Manager of the Year Award. [7] Oaks pitchers tossed two no-hitters in 1974, both in away games. The first was pitched by Joe Henderson against the Wichita Aeros on July 31. [8] The second occurred on August 25 when Butch Stinson no-hit the Indianapolis Indians. [8]

After one season as the Houston Astros' Triple-A club in 1975, Iowa returned to the White Sox organization in 1976. Despite a number of winning seasons, they failed to qualify for the postseason during the five years of their second affiliation with Chicago. On September 1, 1977, Chris Knapp and Fred Howard combined to no-hit the Omaha Royals. [8] On May 26, 1978, Jack Kucek tossed a no-hitter at Sec Taylor Stadium against the Oklahoma City 89ers. [8] Former St. Louis Cardinals manager Tony La Russa managed the Iowa Oaks in 1979 prior to becoming manager of the White Sox. Pitcher Dewey Robinson was selected for the 1979 American Association Most Valuable Pitcher Award after achieving a record of 13–7 and 9 saves with a 2.93 earned run average and 76 strikeouts. [7] [9]

Iowa Cubs (1982–present)

In 1981, the team affiliated with the Chicago Cubs. After a final season as the Oaks, they adopted the nickname of their parent team in 1982 becoming the Iowa Cubs. The name is often shortened to "I-Cubs" to avoid confusion with the major league team. Iowa teams of the 1980s often finished high in the standings but were unable to qualify for the championship playoffs. [2] The only exceptions being in 1983 and 1984 when they earned spots in the semi-finals, but were eliminated by Denver both years. [6] [10] [11]

Cubbie Bear, the team mascot Cubbie Bear.jpg
Cubbie Bear, the team mascot

Members of the 1982 team garnered several league awards. Jay Howell, who struck out 139 batters on the way to a 13–4 record and a 2.36 ERA, [12] won the AA Most Valuable Pitcher Award. [7] Skipper Jim Napier was the league's Manager of the Year. [7] Outfielder Mel Hall was the Rookie of the Year after accruing a batting average of .329 while hitting 34 doubles and 32 home runs and driving in 125 runs. [7] [13] Another Cub outfielder, Joe Carter won the 1983 Rookie of the Year Award after stealing 40 bases and hitting .307 with 22 homers. [7] [14] In 1984, Reggie Patterson fired a no-hitter against the Omaha Royals on August 21. [8] Vince Cotroneo was the team's radio play-by-play announcer in 1988; he was named the National Association League's Minor League Announcer of the Year.

Sec Taylor Stadium was demolished after the 1991 season and a new facility of the same name was constructed on the site in time for the Cubs' 1992 season. [15]

Following a dismal 1992 campaign in which the Cubs went 51–92, [16] they rebounded to win the 1993 West Division title at 85–59. [17] They met the Nashville Sounds in the best-of-seven championship series. Leading the series 3–1, the Cubs lost two consecutive games to force a game seven. [18] In the final game, Nashville held a 2–1 lead from the third inning to the seventh before the Cubs tied the game necessitating extra innings. [18] An eleventh-inning walk-off home run by Iowa's Tuffy Rhodes ended the game and gave the Cubs their first league title. [6] [18] Outfielder Eduardo Zambrano garnered the American Association Most Valuable Player Award after collecting 115 RBI and hitting 32 homers with a .303 average. [19] Iowa did not reach the playoffs again until 1997. They captured the West Division title with a 74–69 record before defeating the New Orleans Zephyrs in the semi-finals. [20] They were swept by the Buffalo Bisons, 3–0, in the championship round. [6]

The American Association, of which the Cubs had been members since their inaugural 1969 campaign, disbanded after the 1997 season. Its teams were absorbed by the two remaining Triple-A leagues—the International League and Pacific Coast League (PCL). The Cubs joined the PCL and won the American Conference Central Division title in 1998 with an 85–59 record. [21] In the American Conference series, they were bested by the New Orleans Zephyrs, 2–1, in a rain-shortened series. [22] Manager Terry Kennedy won the Pacific Coast League Manager of the Year Award. [23] Brett Dolan called Iowa games on the radio in 1998 and 1999 before being hired by the Houston Astros. Dolan was replaced by Dave Raymond, who broadcast games from 2000 to 2004 before going on to work for several major league teams. Former Chicago Cubs manager and Iowa native Bruce Kimm managed the I-Cubs from 2001 to 2002. He led them to the 2001 division title (83–60), [24] but they were again eliminated by New Orleans in the conference series. [22]

A Cubs game at Principal Park in 2014 2014 Principal Park.jpg
A Cubs game at Principal Park in 2014

Mike Quade, former manager of the Chicago Cubs, managed Iowa from 2003 to 2006. Playing at the renamed Principal Park, the Cubs ended the 2004 season at 79–64 giving them another division title. [25] This time, they defeated the Oklahoma RedHawks, 3–2, to win the American Conference championship. [22] In the best-of-five Pacific Coast League championship series, they lost to the Sacramento River Cats, 3–0. [22] In 2007, catcher Geovany Soto, with a .353 average, 26 home runs, and 109 RBI, won the PCL Most Valuable Player Award. [23] [26] Led by PCL Manager of the Year Pat Listach, [23] the 2008 Cubs won the American Conference North Division (83–59), [27] but were beaten in the conference series by Oklahoma, 3–2. [22]

In 2010, the team was managed by Baseball Hall of Fame inductee Ryne Sandberg who was also selected as the league's Manager of the Year. [23] First baseman Bryan LaHair won the 2010 PCL MVP Award with his .331 average, 38 homers, and 109 RBI. [23] [28] On May 7, 2014, Iowa starter Chris Rusin pitched a no-hitter against the New Orleans Zephyrs. [29] In May 2014, Manny Ramirez signed a contract as a part-time player/coach for the I-Cubs. In 2015, right-hander Carlos Pimentel won the PCL Pitcher of the Year Award after achieving a 12–6 record with 118 strikeouts and a 2.95 ERA. [23] [30] The Cubs returned to the postseason in 2019 having won the division 75–65, [31] but were eliminated by the Round Rock Express in the American Conference series. [32]

Many future Cubs stars have played in Des Moines before they were called up to Wrigley Field. Some notable I-Cubs alumni include Greg Maddux, Rafael Palmeiro, Mark Grace, Doug Glanville, Joe Carter, Corey Patterson, Carlos Zambrano, Kyle Farnsworth, Kerry Wood, Steve Trachsel, Tuffy Rhodes, Bruce Kimm, Shawon Dunston, Héctor Villanueva, Mark Prior, Sam Fuld, John Grabow, and Rod Beck. Wood and Prior both made rehabilitation starts for the I-Cubs in 2004 and 2005 before returning to the Chicago Cubs' active roster, and many Cubs players such as Derrek Lee, Daryle Ward, Alfonso Soriano, and Ryan Dempster have also made stops in Des Moines for rehab purposes. Many Cubs stars such as Kris Bryant, Kyle Schwarber, Anthony Rizzo, and Javier Baez made also stops in Iowa.

Season-by-season results

FinishThe team's final position in the divisional standings
GB Games behind the team that finished in first place in the division that season
Double-dagger-14-plain.pngClass champions (1969–present)
Dagger-14-plain.pngLeague champions (1969–present)
§Conference champions (1998–present)
*Division champions (1970–present)
^Postseason berth (1969–1997)
SeasonLeagueDivisionRegular seasonPostseasonMLB affiliate
FinishWinsLossesWin %GB
1969 AA 4th (tie)6278.44323 Oakland Athletics
1970 AA East2nd7068.5073 Oakland Athletics
1971 AA East2nd7169.507112 Oakland Athletics
1972 AA East3rd6278.44321 Oakland Athletics
1973* AA East1st8353.610Won East Division title
Lost AA championship vs Tulsa Oilers, 4–3
Chicago White Sox
1974 AA East2nd7462.54412 Chicago White Sox
1975 AA East4th5679.415212 Houston Astros
1976 AA East2nd6868.50010 Chicago White Sox
1977 AA East4th6175.449112 Chicago White Sox
1978 AA East4th6670.485112 Chicago White Sox
1979 AA East3rd6967.5079 Chicago White Sox
1980 AA East3rd5977.43416 Chicago White Sox
1981 AA East4th5382.393112 Chicago Cubs
1982 AA East2nd (tie)7362.54112 Chicago Cubs
1983^ AA East2nd7165.52212Lost semi-finals vs Denver Bears, 3–1 Chicago Cubs
1984^ AA 2nd8074.51911Lost semi-finals vs Denver Zephyrs, 3–1 Chicago Cubs
1985 AA West4th6675.468112 Chicago Cubs
1986 AA West2nd7468.5212 Chicago Cubs
1987 AA 6th6474.46414 Chicago Cubs
1988 AA West2nd7864.5493 Chicago Cubs
1989 AA West3rd6282.43111 Chicago Cubs
1990 AA West2nd7274.49314 Chicago Cubs
1991 AA West2nd7866.5421 Chicago Cubs
1992 AA West4th5192.357212 Chicago Cubs
1993*Dagger-14-plain.png AA West1st8559.590Won West Division title
Won AA championship vs Nashville Sounds, 4–3
Chicago Cubs
1994 AA 5th6974.48317 Chicago Cubs
1995 AA 5th6974.483112 Chicago Cubs
1996 AA West3rd6478.45114 Chicago Cubs
1997* AA West1st7469.517Won West Division title
Won semi-finals vs New Orleans Zephyrs, 3–0
Lost AA championship vs Buffalo Bisons, 3–0
Chicago Cubs
1998* PCL American Central1st8559.590Won American Central Division title
Lost American Conference title vs New Orleans Zephyrs, 2–1
Chicago Cubs
1999 PCL American Midwest4th6576.46116 Chicago Cubs
2000 PCL American Central4th5787.39629 Chicago Cubs
2001* PCL American Central1st8360.580Won American Central Division title
Lost American Conference title vs New Orleans Zephyrs, 3–0
Chicago Cubs
2002 PCL American Central3rd7173.4937 Chicago Cubs
2003 PCL American Central3rd7072.4933 Chicago Cubs
2004 PCL American Central1st7964.552Won American Central Division title
Won American Conference title vs Oklahoma RedHawks, 3–2
Lost PCL championship vs Sacramento River Cats, 3–0
Chicago Cubs
2005 PCL American North4th6475.46012 Chicago Cubs
2006 PCL American North1st (tie)7668.528 Chicago Cubs
2007 PCL American North2nd7665.54910 Chicago Cubs
2008* PCL American North1st8357.593Won American North Division title
Lost American Conference title vs Oklahoma RedHawks, 3–2
Chicago Cubs
2009 PCL American North3rd7272.5005 Chicago Cubs
2010 PCL American North1st (tie)8262.569 Chicago Cubs
2011 PCL American North4th6677.462112 Chicago Cubs
2012 PCL American North4th5387.37928 Chicago Cubs
2013 PCL American North3rd6575.4642 Chicago Cubs
2014 PCL American North2nd (tie)7470.51412 Chicago Cubs
2015 PCL American North2nd (tie)8064.5566 Chicago Cubs
2016 PCL American North3rd6776.46915 Chicago Cubs
2017 PCL American North4th6772.48214 Chicago Cubs
2018 PCL American North4th5088.36224 Chicago Cubs
2019* PCL American North1st7565.536Won American North Division title
Lost American Conference title vs Round Rock Express, 3–2
Chicago Cubs
2020 PCL American NorthSeason cancelled (COVID-19 pandemic) [33] Chicago Cubs
TotalsWinsLossesWin %Championships
American Association regular season1,9842,076.489
Pacific Coast League regular season1,5601,564.499
Postseason2032.3851993 AA
All-time regular and postseason3,5443,640.493

Roster

Iowa Cubs roster
PlayersCoaches/Other

Pitchers

Catchers

  • 33 Erick Castillo
  • 21 P. J. Higgins
  • 19 Jhonny Pereda

Infielders

  •  6 Trent Giambrone
  •  9 Vimael Machin

Outfielders

Manager

Coaches


Injury icon 2.svg 7-day injured list
* On Chicago Cubs 40-man roster
# Rehab assignment
∞ Reserve list
‡ Restricted list
§ Suspended list
† Temporary inactive list
Roster updated February 7, 2020
Transactions
→ More rosters: MiLB    Pacific Coast League
Chicago Cubs minor league players

Related Research Articles

The Pacific Coast League (PCL) is a Minor League Baseball league operating in the Western, Midwestern, and Southeastern United States. Along with the International League and the Mexican League, it is one of three leagues playing at the Triple-A level, which is one grade below Major League Baseball. It is officially named the Pacific Coast League of Professional Baseball Clubs, Inc. Its headquarters are in Round Rock, Texas.

The Nashville Sounds are a Minor League Baseball team of the Pacific Coast League (PCL) and the Triple-A affiliate of the Texas Rangers. They are located in Nashville, Tennessee, and are named for the city's association with the music industry. The team plays its home games at First Horizon Park, which opened in 2015 and is located on the site of the historic Sulphur Dell ballpark. The Sounds previously played at Herschel Greer Stadium from its opening in 1978 until the end of the 2014 season. They are the oldest active professional sports franchise in Nashville.

American Association (20th century) Defunct baseball class-AAA minor league from 1902 to 1962 and 1969 to 1997

The American Association (AA) was a Minor League Baseball league that operated primarily in the Midwestern and South Central United States from 1902 to 1962 and 1969 to 1997. It was classified as a Triple-A league, which is one grade below Major League Baseball, for most of its existence.

The Memphis Redbirds are a Minor League Baseball team of the Pacific Coast League (PCL) and the Triple-A affiliate of the St. Louis Cardinals. They are located in Memphis, Tennessee, and are named for their Major League Baseball affiliate. The Redbirds play their home games at AutoZone Park, which opened in 2000 and is located in Downtown Memphis. The team previously played at Tim McCarver Stadium in 1998 and 1999.

Pat Listach American baseball player

Patrick Alan Listach is the former Manager of the Triple-A Tacoma Rainiers of the Pacific Coast League and a former Major League Baseball shortstop, minor league manager, and major league third base coach. He is currently the manager of the Acereros de Monclova of the Mexican League.

Ernie Broglio American baseball player

Ernest Gilbert Broglio was a professional baseball pitcher. He played for the St. Louis Cardinals and Chicago Cubs of Major League Baseball from 1959 to 1966.

Jim Marshall (baseball) American baseball player and coach

Rufus James Marshall is an American former professional baseball player, manager and coach. He played in Major League Baseball as a first baseman from 1958 through 1965. Marshall managed the Chicago Cubs (1974–76) and the Oakland Athletics (1979) but never enjoyed a winning season in either post. His career big-league managing record was 229–326 (.413) and his 1979 A's squad lost 108 of 162 games (.333). Born in Danville, Illinois, and raised in Long Beach, California, he threw and batted left-handed and was listed as 6 feet 1 inch (185 cm) tall and 190 pounds.

Calvin Wayne Emery, was a professional baseball first baseman and batting coach, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Phillies. He also spent the 1970 season with Hankyu Braves of the Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB). During his playing days, Emery stood 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m) tall, weighing 205 pounds (93 kg); he threw and batted left-handed. Emery attended Penn State University.

Damon Berryhill American baseball player

Damon Scott Berryhill is an American former professional baseball catcher and current manager for the AAA Gwinnett Stripers. He played ten seasons for the Chicago Cubs, the Atlanta Braves, the Boston Red Sox, the Cincinnati Reds, and the San Francisco Giants of the Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1987 to 1997. He threw right and was a switch hitter.

Andy Green (baseball) Professional baseball manager and former player

Andrew Mulligan Green is an American former professional baseball utility player and manager. He is the bench coach for the Chicago Cubs of Major League Baseball (MLB). He is a former manager of the San Diego Padres and former third-base coach of the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Andrew Jason Lorraine is an American former professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1994 to 2002 for the California Angels, Chicago White Sox, Oakland Athletics, Seattle Mariners, Chicago Cubs, Cleveland Indians, and Milwaukee Brewers. He was born in Los Angeles, California. He also played for the La New Bears in Taiwan's Chinese Professional Baseball League.

Jake Fox American baseball player

Jacob Quirin Fox is an American former professional baseball utility player. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Chicago Cubs, Oakland Athletics and Baltimore Orioles, and in the KBO League for the Hanwha Eagles.

Marv Foley American baseball player and coach

Marvis Edwin Foley is an American former professional baseball catcher and coach, former minor league baseball coach and manager, and current Major League Baseball catching instructor for the Colorado Rockies. In the MLB, he played all or part of five seasons, between 1978 and 1984, for the Chicago White Sox and Texas Rangers. He is the only manager ever to win league championships in all three major Triple-A leagues.

The Pacific Coast League Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) is an annual award given to the best player in Minor League Baseball's Pacific Coast League (PCL) based on their regular season performance. Though the league was established in 1903, the award was not created until 1927. Managers from the 16 Pacific Coast League teams vote for the winner of the award, which is then combined with 16 votes from various general managers, broadcasters, and media representatives around the league to determine a winner. The award was formerly voted upon by writers from The Sporting News.

The Pacific Coast League Pitcher of the Year Award is an annual award given to the best pitcher in Minor League Baseball's Pacific Coast League (PCL) based on their regular season performance. Though the league was established in 1903, the award was not created until 1957. It was issued only sporadically through 1974 before being discontinued from 1975 to 2000. From 1927 to 2000, PCL pitchers were eligible to win the Most Valuable Player Award (MVP). A total of 10 pitchers won the MVP Award. The Pitcher of the Year Award was revived in 2001 and has since been awarded annually. Managers and broadcasters from the 16 Pacific Coast League teams and media representatives in each city across the league vote for the winner of the award.

The Pacific Coast League Manager of the Year Award is an annual award given to the best manager in Minor League Baseball's Pacific Coast League (PCL) based on their team's regular season performance. Though the league was established in 1903, the award was not created until 1952. Managers, officials, and broadcasters from the 16 PCL teams and media representatives in each city across the league vote for the winner of the award.

The American Association Most Valuable Pitcher Award was an annual award given to the best pitcher in Minor League Baseball's American Association (AA) based on their regular season performance. Though the league was established in 1902, the award was not created until 1969. From 1929 to 1962, AA pitchers were eligible to win the Most Valuable Player Award (MVP). A total of 8 pitchers won the MVP Award before the league disbanded after the 1962 season. The Most Valuable Pitcher Award was issued starting with the league's revival in 1969 and continued to be awarded through 1996; no award was given in the final 1997 season.

History of the Nashville Sounds History of the Minor League Baseball franchise

The Nashville Sounds Minor League Baseball team was established in Nashville, Tennessee, in 1978, after Larry Schmittou and a group of investors purchased the rights to operate an expansion franchise of the Double-A Southern League. The Sounds played their home games at Herschel Greer Stadium from its opening in 1978 until the end of the 2014 season. In 2015, the Sounds left Greer for First Tennessee Park, now known as First Horizon Park, a new facility located on the site of the historic Sulphur Dell ballpark, home to Nashville's minor league teams from 1885 to 1963.

The 1916 Los Angeles Angels season was the 14th season for the Los Angeles Angels playing in the Pacific Coast League (PCL). The Angels compiled a 119–79 record and won the PCL pennant. The team played its home games at Washington Park in Los Angeles.

References

  1. "Iowa Cubs Front Office". MiLB.com. Retrieved 12 April 2020.
  2. 1 2 "Des Moines, Iowa Encyclopedia". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  3. "1970 American Association". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  4. "1971 American Association". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  5. "1973 American Association". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  6. 1 2 3 4 "American Association Playoff Results". Triple-A Baseball. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  7. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "American Association Special Award Winners". Triple-A Baseball. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  8. 1 2 3 4 5 McGill, Chuck. "Minor League No-Hitters". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 12, 2019.
  9. "Dewey Robinson Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  10. "1983 American Association". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  11. "1984 American Association". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  12. "Jay Howell Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  13. "Mel Hall Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  14. "Joe Carter Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  15. "Iowa Cubs: Ballpark". Minor League Baseball. January 12, 2006. Retrieved March 11, 2007.
  16. "1992 American Association". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  17. "1993 American Association". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  18. 1 2 3 Taft, Larry (September 16, 1993). "Iowa Ends Sounds' Championship Charge". The Tennessean. Nashville. p. 1C. Retrieved April 26, 2019.
  19. "Eddie Zambrano Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  20. "1997 American Association". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  21. "1998 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  22. 1 2 3 4 5 "Past Champions". Pacific Coast League. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  23. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Pacific Coast League Award Winners". Pacific Coast League. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  24. "2001 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  25. "2004 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  26. "Geovany Soto Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 12, 2019.
  27. "2008 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  28. "Bryan LaHair Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 12, 2019.
  29. Dykstra, Sam (May 7, 2014). "Rusin Tosses First PCL No-hitter Since '09". Minor League Baseball. Retrieved August 12, 2015.
  30. "Carlos Pimentel Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 12, 2019.
  31. "2019 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  32. "2019 Pacific Coast League Playoffs". Pacific Coast League. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  33. "2020 Minor League Baseball Season Shelved". Minor League Baseball. June 30, 2020. Retrieved July 1, 2020.