1950 Major League Baseball season

Last updated

1950 MLB season
League Major League Baseball
Sport Baseball
DurationApril 18 – October 7, 1950
Number of games154
Number of teams16
Regular season
Season MVP AL: Phil Rizzuto (NYY)
NL: Jim Konstanty (PHP)
AL champions New York Yankees
  AL runners-up Detroit Tigers
NL champions Philadelphia Phillies
  NL runners-up Brooklyn Dodgers
World Series
Champions New York Yankees
  Runners-up Philadelphia Phillies
Finals MVP Jerry Coleman (NYY)
MLB seasons

The 1950 Major League Baseball season began on April 18 and ended on October 7, 1950, with the New York Yankees of the American League winning the World Series over the Philadelphia Phillies of the National League in four games.

Contents

The only no-hitter of the season was pitched by Vern Bickford on August 9, in the Boston Braves 7–0 victory over the Brooklyn Dodgers. [1] [2] This season saw the first use of a bullpen car, by the Cleveland Indians. [3]

Awards and honors

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

  World Series
    
 AL NY Yankees 4
 NL Phi Phillies 0

League leaders

American League

National League

Managers

American League

TeamManagerComments
Boston Red Sox Joe McCarthy and Steve O'Neill
Chicago White Sox Jack Onslow and Red Corriden
Cleveland Indians Lou Boudreau
Detroit Tigers Red Rolfe
New York Yankees Casey Stengel
Philadelphia Athletics Connie Mack
St. Louis Browns Zack Taylor
Washington Senators Bucky Harris

National League

TeamManagerComments
Boston Braves Billy Southworth
Brooklyn Dodgers Burt Shotton
Chicago Cubs Frankie Frisch
Cincinnati Reds Luke Sewell
New York Giants Leo Durocher
Philadelphia Phillies Eddie Sawyer
Pittsburgh Pirates Billy Meyer
St. Louis Cardinals Eddie Dyer

Home Field Attendance

Team NameWinsHome attendancePer Game
New York Yankees [4] 981.0%2,081,380-8.9%27,031
Detroit Tigers [5] 959.2%1,951,4747.2%24,092
Cleveland Indians [6] 923.4%1,727,464-22.7%22,435
Boston Red Sox [7] 94-2.1%1,344,080-15.8%17,456
Philadelphia Phillies [8] 9112.3%1,217,03548.5%15,603
Brooklyn Dodgers [9] 89-8.2%1,185,896-27.4%15,204
Pittsburgh Pirates [10] 57-19.7%1,166,267-19.5%15,146
Chicago Cubs [11] 644.9%1,165,9442.0%14,948
St. Louis Cardinals [12] 78-18.8%1,093,411-23.6%14,387
New York Giants [13] 8617.8%1,008,878-17.2%13,275
Boston Braves [14] 8310.7%944,391-12.7%11,954
Chicago White Sox [15] 60-4.8%781,330-16.6%9,890
Washington Senators [16] 6734.0%699,697-9.2%8,970
Cincinnati Reds [17] 666.5%538,794-23.9%7,089
Philadelphia Athletics [18] 52-35.8%309,805-62.1%4,023
St. Louis Browns [19] 589.4%247,131-8.8%3,340

See also

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References

  1. "American League No Hitters". Baseball Almanac . Retrieved October 1, 2012.
  2. "National League No Hitters". Baseball Almanac . Retrieved October 1, 2012.
  3. Lukas, Paul (October 19, 2007). "Lukas: Long live the bullpen car - ESPN Page 2". Espn.com. Retrieved February 24, 2018.
  4. "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  5. "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  6. "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  17. "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  18. "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  19. "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved September 8, 2020.