Bud Black

Last updated
Bud Black
Budblack2.jpg
Black with the San Diego Padres
Colorado Rockies – No. 10
Pitcher / Manager
Born: (1957-06-30) June 30, 1957 (age 62)
San Mateo, California
Batted: LeftThrew: Left
MLB debut
September 5, 1981, for the Seattle Mariners
Last MLB appearance
July 9, 1995, for the Cleveland Indians
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 121–116
Earned run average 3.84
Strikeouts 1,039
Managerial record898–951
Winning %.486
Teams
As player

As manager

As coach

Career highlights and awards

Harry Ralston "Bud" Black (born June 30, 1957) is an American professional baseball manager and former player who is the manager of the Colorado Rockies. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a pitcher from 1981 through 1995, most notably for the Kansas City Royals and Cleveland Indians. He coached the Anaheim Angels / Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim from 2000 through 2006, and managed the San Diego Padres from 2007 through 2015. He was named the National League Manager of the Year in 2010.

Contents

Early life

Black is a graduate of Mark Morris High School in Longview, Washington. He attended San Diego State University and graduated in 1979 with a bachelor's degree in management. [1]

Playing career

College

Black played two years at Lower Columbia College in Longview. For his junior and senior years, he played at San Diego State. [2]

Professional

Black pitched fifteen seasons in the majors, most notably for the Kansas City Royals. He won 121 games in his career and was part of the starting rotation for the Royals team that won the 1985 World Series. He also played for the Seattle Mariners, Cleveland Indians, Toronto Blue Jays and San Francisco Giants. [3]

Black was the starting pitcher for the Royals during the famous George Brett pine tar incident, and was the pitcher who gave up Reggie Jackson's 500th career home run.

Between MLB seasons, Black pitched for the Leones del Caracas of the Venezuela Winter League and was a member of the 1982 Caribbean Series champion team.

Coaching/Managerial career

Anaheim Angels/Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

Black was the pitching coach of the Anaheim Angels/Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim from 2000-2006 under Manager Mike Scioscia. As the Angels pitching coach, Black won a World Series ring in 2002 against the San Francisco Giants.

San Diego Padres

In October 2006, Brian Sabean, general manager of the Giants, interviewed Black for the Giants' vacant managerial position. [4]

After the position went to Padres manager Bruce Bochy, Black became a candidate for the Padres job, and was officially hired on November 8, 2006. Despite a last place finish for the Padres in 2008, Black returned to finish his contract in 2009. During the 2009 season, Black was given a contract extension for the 2010 season with a club option for 2011. During the 2010 season, the Padres gave Black another three-year extension through 2013, with club options in 2014 and 2015. [5] In 2010, Black presided over the worst collapse in Padres history when they went on a ten-game losing streak with a little over a month left in the season, went 12-16 in September and squandered a 6 1/2 game lead over the Giants for the NL West title. Black nonetheless was the winner of the 2010 National League Manager of the Year Award, edging Dusty Baker of the Cincinnati Reds in voting by a single point. [6] Black is only the third former full-time pitcher to win a Manager of the Year Award, joining Tommy Lasorda and Larry Dierker.

On June 15, 2015, Black was fired after eight-plus seasons with the Padres after the team started 2015 at 32–33 and was six games behind in the National League West. [7] He finished with a record of 649 wins and 713 losses. [8]

On October 28, 2015, The Washington Post reported that the Washington Nationals intended to hire Black as their new manager following the 2015 World Series, replacing fired manager Matt Williams. [9] However, it was later reported that he would not be getting the job. [10] Black turned down the Nationals offer, which he considered to be too low. [11]

Return to Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

On November 25, 2015, it was announced that Black would be returning to the Los Angeles Angels to serve as a special assistant to the new General Manager, Billy Eppler. [12] Black previously served as a pitching coach for the team from 2000-2006.

Colorado Rockies

Black representing the Rockies at the 2018 Major League Baseball Home Run Derby Bud Black (47664047441) (cropped).jpg
Black representing the Rockies at the 2018 Major League Baseball Home Run Derby

On November 7, 2016, the Colorado Rockies announced the team had hired Black as its new manager. [13] On April 3, 2017, Black won his Rockies debut, defeating the Milwaukee Brewers on Opening Day, notching his 650th win as a manager. [14]

Managerial record

As of 2019 season
TeamFromToRegular season recordPostseason record
GWLWin %GWLWin %
San Diego Padres 2007 2015 1362649713.477DNQ
Colorado Rockies 2017 present487249238.511514.200
Total1849898951.486514.200
Reference: [8]

Personal life

Black was born to Canadian parents in Northern California. He and his wife, Nanette, a pediatric ICU nurse, have two daughters: Jamie attended Oregon State University and is currently an interior designer, and Jessie, a collegiate gymnast, graduated from the University of Maryland with a degree in math and kinesiology in 2014.

See also

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References

  1. Distinguished Alumni.
  2. "Bud Black - BR Bullpen". Baseball-Reference. Retrieved 1 June 2010.
  3. "Mark Morris Baseball Alumni" . Retrieved 1 June 2010.
  4. Schulman, Henry (2006-10-19). "Bud Black, Giants hold managerial talk". The San Francisco Chronicle.
  5. Brock, Corey (2010-07-19). "Padres give Black three-year extension". MLB.com . Retrieved 2010-07-19.
  6. Brock, Corey (2010-11-17). "Black edges Baker by one for top NL skipper". MLB.com . Retrieved 2010-11-17.
  7. Lin, Dennis (June 15, 2015). "Padres fire manager Bud Black". The San Diego Union-Tribune. Archived from the original on November 24, 2015.
  8. 1 2 "Bud Black". Baseball Reference. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 28, 2015.
  9. Wagner, James (October 28, 2015). "Nationals expected to name Bud Black next manager". The Washington Post.
  10. Heyman, Jon (November 2, 2015). "In twist, Nats turn to Dusty Baker, who may get managing job now". CBS Sports. Archived from the original on November 17, 2015. Retrieved November 2, 2015.
  11. Nightengale, Bob (November 2, 2015). "Nationals, Dusty Baker in talks after Bud Black deal hits snag". USA Today. Retrieved November 2, 2015.
  12. Calcaterra, Craig (November 25, 2015). "Bud Black rejoins the Angels in a front office role". HardballTalk. Retrieved November 25, 2015.
  13. Armas, Genaro (2017-04-03). "Rockies win in debuts of Black, Holland, beat Brewers 7-5". AP News. Archived from the original on 2017-04-06. Retrieved 2017-04-06.

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Dick Pole
Anaheim Angels Pitching Coach
2000–2006
Succeeded by
Mike Butcher