List of saints of the Society of Jesus

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St. Ignatius of Loyola, recognized as a saint by the Catholic Church, founded the Society of Jesus in 1534. Ignatius-Loyola.jpg
St. Ignatius of Loyola, recognized as a saint by the Catholic Church, founded the Society of Jesus in 1534.

The list of saints of the Society of Jesus here is alphabetical. It includes Jesuit saints from Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas. Since the founder of the Jesuits, St Ignatius of Loyola, was canonised in 1622, there have been 52 other Jesuits canonised. [1]

Contents

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

Jesuit Martyrs of China including Saint Leon-Ignance Mangin SJ Chinesemartyrs-htm sm.jpg
Jesuit Martyrs of China including Saint Lèon-Ignance Mangin SJ

O

P

R

S

Saint Francis Xavier SJ, missionary to Asia FranciscusXavier.jpg
Saint Francis Xavier SJ, missionary to Asia

W

X

See also

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References

  1. List of saints from Society of Jesus, retrieved 23 December 2014