McArthur, Arkansas

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McArthur, Arkansas
Unincorporated community
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McArthur, Arkansas
McArthur's position in Arkansas
Coordinates: 33°41′22.4″N91°20′5.4″W / 33.689556°N 91.334833°W / 33.689556; -91.334833 Coordinates: 33°41′22.4″N91°20′5.4″W / 33.689556°N 91.334833°W / 33.689556; -91.334833
Country Flag of the United States.svg  United States
State Flag of Arkansas.svg  Arkansas
County Desha
Township Clayton
Elevation [1] 45 m (148 ft)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
  Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 71654
Area code(s) 870
GNIS feature ID 58138
U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: McArthur, Arkansas

McArthur is an unincorporated community in Clayton Township, Desha County, Arkansas. [1] It is located on Arkansas Highway 1 northeast of McGehee. [2]

Unincorporated area Region of land not governed by own local government

In law, an unincorporated area is a region of land that is not governed by a local municipal corporation; similarly an unincorporated community is a settlement that is not governed by its own local municipal corporation, but rather is administered as part of larger administrative divisions, such as a township, parish, borough, county, city, canton, state, province or country. Occasionally, municipalities dissolve or disincorporate, which may happen if they become fiscally insolvent, and services become the responsibility of a higher administration. Widespread unincorporated communities and areas are a distinguishing feature of the United States and Canada. In most other countries of the world, there are either no unincorporated areas at all, or these are very rare; typically remote, outlying, sparsely populated or uninhabited areas.

Desha County, Arkansas County in the United States

Desha County is a county located in the southeast part of the U.S. state of Arkansas, with its eastern border the Mississippi River. As of the 2010 census, the population was 13,008. It ranks fifty-sixth of Arkansas's seventy-five counties in terms of population. The county seat is Arkansas City. Located in the Arkansas Delta, Desha County's rivers and fertile soils became prosperous for planters under the cotton-based economy of plantation agriculture in the antebellum years and late nineteenth century. Still largely rural, it has suffered population losses and economic decline since the mid-20th century.

Arkansas State of the United States of America

Arkansas is a state in the southern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2018. Its name is of Siouan derivation from the language of the Osage denoting their related kin, the Quapaw Indians. The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta.

McArthur is one of two possible sites of the death of Hernando de Soto. The Natives of the region called the Mississippi River "Tamaliseu", while De Soto called it "Río del Espíritu Santo". Afraid of revealing to the Native Americans that he was a mortal and not a deity, he opted for a watery burial under the Mississippi. [3]

Hernando de Soto Spanish explorer and conquistador

Hernando de Soto was a Spanish explorer and conquistador who was involved in expeditions in Nicaragua and the Yucatan Peninsula, and played an important role in Pizarro's conquest of the Inca Empire in Peru, but is best known for leading the first Spanish and European expedition deep into the territory of the modern-day United States. He is the first European documented as having crossed the Mississippi River.

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Arkansas River major tributary of the Mississippi River, United States

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Pacaha

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References

  1. 1 2 "McArthur, Arkansas". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved January 20, 2012.
  2. Arkansas Atlas and Gazetteer (Map) (Second ed.). DeLorme. § 22.
  3. Davidson, James West. After the Fact: The Art of Historical Detection Volume 1. Mc Graw Hill, New York 2010, Chapter 1, p. 1