Monster Hunter Portable 3rd

Last updated
Monster Hunter Portable 3rd
Monster Hunter Portable 3rd.png
Official Japanese Cover Art
Developer(s) Capcom
Publisher(s) Capcom
Series Monster Hunter
Platform(s) PlayStation Portable PlayStation 3
ReleasePlayStation Portable
  • JP: December 1, 2010
  • KO: December 1, 2010
PlayStation 3
  • JP: August 25, 2011
Genre(s) Action role-playing game
Mode(s)Singleplayer, multiplayer

Monster Hunter Portable 3rd (モンスターハンターポータブル3rd) is a game in the Monster Hunter franchise for the PlayStation Portable system that was released in Japan on December 1, 2010. The game was released, as a part of the PlayStation Portable Remaster series, on PlayStation 3. [1] The game introduces new regions, monsters, and a revised Felyne combat system. [2] Monster Hunter Portable 3rd is not an update to Monster Hunter Freedom Unite or Monster Hunter Tri . Monster Hunter Portable 3rd is instead separate to the rest of the series, and most of the game has been entirely remade. [3] [4] However, it is also a successor to Monster Hunter Freedom Unite as the third game in the Portable series.

Contents

Monster Hunter Portable 3rd HD ver. is a high definition remastering of the game for the PlayStation 3, and is the first of Sony's "PSP Remasters" series for the PS3. The game was released in Japan on August 25, 2011 [5] and features enhanced HD graphics, 3D support and shared save support with the PSP. [6]

Gameplay

The new base of operations is Yukumo Village. This village has a feudal Japanese feel to it, both from its design to its residents. Now the Felynes train in the farm and have more training options like the marathon training in which the Felyne runs around the farm. The player can take two Felynes out with him/her on a single player quest, up from the single companion of Monster Hunter Freedom Unite. When you take Felynes out on quests, monster attacks are divided between the player and the companions, making hunts easier. Also new to Monster Hunter Portable 3rd is the ability to customize the Felyne companions' equipment. Doing so will change the creature's physical appearance and properties. The player will be able to customize the Felynes in three areas: weapon, head parts and torso parts. A new field introduced in the game is Mountain Stream (渓流, Keiryū). All the hunting fields in Monster Hunter Tri, along with the addition of the Mountain Stream field are included in Monster Hunter Portable 3rd. Underwater quests, however, have been completely removed, therefore maps such as the Deserted Island and Flooded Forest have been revised to work around this. [3] [4] Not all monsters from Monster Hunter Tri are present in Monster Hunter Portable 3rd – Lagiacrus, Gobul, and Ceadeus have been removed. Zinogre, the flagship monster of the game is shown on the cover art.

The Guild Hall now features a hot spring, similar to the Felyne Kitchen from previous games, which can be upgraded by clearing special 'Hot Spring Quests' which upgrade the effects of the hot spring, as well as the Felyne Whim Skills, which can now be chosen and selected by the player.

All weapon classes from previous games (Great Sword, Long Sword, Sword and Shield, Dual Blades, Hammer, Hunting Horn, Lance, Gunlance, Switch Axe, Light Bowgun, Heavy Bowgun and Bow) are present in the game. The four classes which were not present in Tri (Dual blades, Hunting Horn, Gunlance and Bow) have been revised. The equipment creation and fortification systems received a variety of changes. Producer Ryozo Tsujimoto claimed that this area of the game will keep what was good from Monster Hunter Freedom Unite and Monster Hunter Tri and add new elements. [3] [4]

Reception

Famitsu gave the PSP version a score of two tens, one nine, and one ten, for an almost-perfect score of 39 out of 40. [7]

Sales

The game was number one in the Japanese sales chart of 5 December 2010, replacing Gran Turismo 5 . [8] Within two weeks of release by December 20, Monster Hunter Portable 3rd sold 2.58 million units in Japan. [9] According to the game's publisher, Monster Hunter Portable 3rd is "now the fastest selling PSP title ever in Japan" and "the fastest selling game in Capcom's history." [10] By June 2011, the game's sales in Japan had reached 4.8 million units; making it one of the best-selling PSP game of all time. [11]

Related Research Articles

<i>Monster Hunter</i> (video game) video game

Monster Hunter is an action role-playing game for the PlayStation 2. The game was developed and published by Capcom. Monster Hunter was released in North America on September 21, 2004. It was remade and expanded in Monster Hunter G, which was released in Japan and was brought to North America and Europe as Monster Hunter Freedom for the PlayStation Portable.

<i>Final Fantasy Type-0</i> video game

Final Fantasy Type-0 is an action role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix for the PlayStation Portable (PSP). Released in Japan on October 27, 2011, Type-0 is part of the Fabula Nova Crystallis subseries, a set of games sharing a common mythos which includes Final Fantasy XIII and Final Fantasy XV. The gameplay, similar to Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII, has the player taking control of characters in real-time combat during missions across Orience. The player also engages in large-scale strategy-based battles on the world map, and has access to a multiplayer option during story missions and side quests.

<i>Monster Hunter Freedom</i> 2005 video game

Monster Hunter Freedom is an action role-playing game for the PlayStation Portable. It is a handheld re-mastered version of the first two games in the Monster Hunter series and it is based mostly on Monster Hunter G. The game's aim is to complete quests given by various people in the goal of attaining higher and more prestigious hunting ranks. However, this game contains many changes in order to allow playing through most quests alone. It was criticized for its unusually long loading-screens and its slow pacing, both of which have been improved in the sequel. Its Japanese counterpart is called Monster Hunter Portable

<i>Monster Hunter Freedom 2</i> 2007 video game

Monster Hunter Freedom 2 is a PlayStation Portable video game and sequel to Monster Hunter Freedom, it is largely based on its PlayStation 2 predecessor Monster Hunter 2, which was never released outside Japan. Monster Hunter Freedom 2 is not a direct port of Monster Hunter 2 but instead a portable update of the Monster Hunter series. New features have been added while others were removed to make the game appropriate for its portable platform. It was released in North America on August 28, 2007. Its Japanese counterpart is called Monster Hunter Portable 2nd.

<i>The 3rd Birthday</i> Square Enix third-person shooter video game

The 3rd Birthday is a third-person role-playing shooter co-developed by Square Enix and HexaDrive, and published by Square Enix for the PlayStation Portable. It was released in Japan in 2010 and in North America and Europe in 2011. The game is both the third entry in the Parasite Eve video game series, based on the titular Japanese novel, and a spin-off, having only a loose connection to events from past games. The game features a third-person shooter-based combat system with role-playing mechanics. A key mechanic is the Overdive ability, which allows the player to possess pre-positioned human allies and inflict damage upon enemies.

<i>Monster Hunter Tri</i> 2009 video game

Monster Hunter Tri is the third console installment in the Monster Hunter franchise, developed by Capcom and released for the Wii in Japan on August 1, 2009. Monster Hunter Tri was released on April 20, 2010, in North America, April 23 in Europe, and April 29 in Australia.

<i>Monster Hunter Freedom Unite</i> video game

Monster Hunter Freedom Unite is a 2008 video game in the Monster Hunter franchise for PlayStation Portable and iOS. It is an expansion of the original Monster Hunter Freedom 2 and was released on March 27, 2008 in Japan as Monster Hunter Portable 2nd G.

<i>Monster Hunter</i> Video game series

The Monster Hunter franchise is a series of fantasy-themed action role-playing video games that started with the game Monster Hunter for PlayStation 2, released in 2004. Titles have been released across a variety of platforms, including personal computer, home console, portable consoles, and mobile devices. The series is developed and published by Capcom.

The Japan Game Awards is the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry's awards ceremony, which was created in 1996 as the CESA Awards. While it represents the Japanese video game industry, it is not limited to Japanese video games, but also includes international video games.

<i>Last Ranker</i> video game

Last Ranker is a role-playing video game developed by imageepoch and published by Capcom for the PlayStation Portable, and released in Japan on July 15, 2010. In Last Ranker, warriors are ranked by how they perform in battle by a combat organization called Bazalta, which is headquartered in the city of Ghandoar. The protagonist of the game is a man named Zig who is part of a group of wanderers called Cantalera and decides to leave his group and head to Ghandoar, join Bazalta, and make his way to the top.

<i>Tales of the World: Radiant Mythology 3</i> 2011 video game

Tales of the World: Radiant Mythology 3 is the sixth entry in the Tales of the World series, and the third entry in the Radiant Mythology series. Like most of the "Tales Of" games, the game is only available in Japanese. Like other games in the series, it features a group of characters from various Tales games.

<i>Dissidia 012 Final Fantasy</i> video game

Dissidia 012 Final Fantasy is a 2011 fighting game published by Square Enix for the PlayStation Portable as part of the Final Fantasy series. It was developed by the company's 1st Production Department and released in Japan on March 3, 2011. The game is both a prequel and remake of Dissidia Final Fantasy, revealing what occurred before the events of its predecessor, and was released on March 22, 2011 in North America.

<i>Resident Evil: The Mercenaries 3D</i> video game

Resident Evil: The Mercenaries 3D is a third-person shooter video game developed by Capcom for the Nintendo 3DS. It was released on June 2, 2011 in Japan, June 28, 2011 in North America, June 30, 2011 in Australia, and July 1, 2011 in Europe. The game was announced at the 2010 Nintendo conference in Japan. A combination of the "Mercenaries" minigames featured in Resident Evil 4 and Resident Evil 5, players must defeat as many enemies as possible within a set time limit.

<i>Final Fantasy IV: The Complete Collection</i> video game compilation

Final Fantasy IV: The Complete Collection is a compilation consisting of enhanced ports of the role-playing video games Final Fantasy IV and Final Fantasy IV: The After Years, as well as a new scenario called Final Fantasy IV Interlude, which is set between the two games. It was published by Square Enix for the PlayStation Portable in Japan on March 24, 2011; in North America on April 19, 2011; in Europe on April 21, 2011; and in Australia on April 28, 2011. It was also released as digital download.

<i>Monster Hunter Diary: Poka Poka Airou Village</i> video game

Monster Hunter Diary Poka Poka Airou Village is a spin-off installment in the Monster Hunter series, developed by FromSoftware and published by Capcom for the PlayStation Portable. It was released in Japan on August 26, 2010. The word airou is the Japanese equivalent of felyne, a fictional sapient cat species that appears in the Monster Hunter games. The player gives orders to the felynes to progress to the end of quests instead of having direct control over them. The game uses a more cartoonish art style as opposed to the realism seen in other Monster Hunter: games. More emphasis is placed on style and village management. A few Hello Kitty items are also available in the game.

The 2011 Tōhoku earthquake had a significant impact on the nation of Japan, including one of its most well-known economic sector, the video game industry. The damage to Japan's infrastructure prompted delays in software and hardware releases, and also caused outright cancellations when the subject matter of the software was considered too similar to real-life events. At the same time, the Japanese gaming industry took on relief efforts to assist those most directly affected by the earthquake and subsequent tsunami.

<i>Genso Suikoden: Tsumugareshi Hyakunen no Toki</i> video game

Genso Suikoden: Tsumugareshi Hyakunen no Toki "Gensō Suikoden: The Woven Web of a Century" is a role-playing video game developed by Konami for the PlayStation Portable. It was released in Japan on February 9, 2012.

Felyne

The Felyne is a fictional species of anthropomorphic cats in the Monster Hunter video game series developed by Capcom. They are the most common members of a diminutive race known as the Lynians that also includes the Shakalaka. They accompany player characters, or "hunters", and can act as AI-controlled backup. Felynes who partner with a hunter are known as Palicoes and wear miniature suits of armor. Felynes have become a popular mascot for the series, and have featured in spin-off games, many cross-promotions with other Capcom and non-Capcom video games, and various Japanese consumer products.

<i>Unchained Blades</i> 2011 video game

Unchained Blades, titled UnchainBlades ReXX in Japan, is a dungeon crawler role-playing video game developed by Japanese developer FuRyu for the Nintendo 3DS and PlayStation Portable video game consoles. It was released in Japan on July 14, 2011, and in North America exclusively as a digital download on June 26, 2012 for the PlayStation Portable, and on January 3, 2013 for the Nintendo 3DS.

The Japanese video game magazine Famitsū assigns scores to video games by having four reviewers each give a score from 0 to 10. The scores of the four reviewers are then added up for a maximum possible score of 40. From the twenty two games awarded with a perfect score as of 2016, three are for the Nintendo DS and five are for the Wii. The PlayStation 3 also has five games with a perfect score and the Xbox 360 has four, with both consoles having two titles in common. The others are for different platforms with only one title each. Franchises with multiple perfect score winners include The Legend of Zelda with four, Metal Gear with three, followed by Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy with two.

References

  1. "3D Monster Hunter Set For PS3". Andriasang.com. Archived from the original on 2012-07-21. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  2. Spencer . March 16, 2010 . 12:51am (2010-03-16). "Monster Hunter Portable 3rd Announced For PSP [Update". Siliconera. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  3. 1 2 3 "All About Monster Hunter Freedom 3". Andriasang.com. Archived from the original on 2012-07-21. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  4. 1 2 3 "Monster Hunter Portable 3rd: Fresher & Bigger Monster Hunting Experience". PSPHyper. 2010-03-28. Retrieved 2012-02-17.
  5. Anoop Gantayat (2011-06-02). "Monster Hunter Portable 3rd HD Dated and Priced". Andriasang. Archived from the original on 2012-07-21. Retrieved 2011-08-07.
  6. Anoop Gantayat (2011-05-22). "3D Monster Hunter Set For PS3". Andriasang. Archived from the original on 2012-07-21. Retrieved 2011-05-22.
  7. Brian (November 24, 2010). "Complete Famitsu review scores". Nintendo Everything. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  8. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-11-17. Retrieved 2012-06-10.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  9. Anoop Gantayat (2010-12-16). "Level-5 Studio Ghibli Tie-up Tops 170,000". Andriasang. Archived from the original on 2012-07-22. Retrieved 2011-08-07.
  10. Anoop Gantayat (2010-12-20). "Monster Hunter Portable 3rd Crosses 3 Million: The fastest selling title in Capcom history". Andriasang. Archived from the original on 2012-07-20. Retrieved 2011-05-09.
  11. "Platinum Titles". Capcom. 2011-06-30. Retrieved 2011-08-07.