Obispo Formation, Bolivia

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Obispo Formation
Stratigraphic range: Dapingian
~478–466  Ma
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Type Geological formation
Lithology
Primary Shale, siltstone
Location
Coordinates 21°00′S65°00′W / 21.0°S 65.0°W / -21.0; -65.0 Coordinates: 21°00′S65°00′W / 21.0°S 65.0°W / -21.0; -65.0
Approximate paleocoordinates 45°18′S129°06′W / 45.3°S 129.1°W / -45.3; -129.1
Region Tarija Department
CountryFlag of Bolivia.svg  Bolivia
Bolivia physical map.svg
Dark Green 004040 pog.svg
Dark Green 004040 pog.svg
Obispo Formation, Bolivia (Bolivia)

The Obispo Formation is a Dapingian geologic formation of southern Bolivia. The shales and siltstones were deposited in an open marine environment. [1] [2]

Contents

Fossil content

The formation has provided the following fossils:

See also

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Santa Lucía Formation

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Malargüe Group

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Mesón Group

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Hiló Formation

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Tucumilla Formation Geologic formation in Bolivia

The Tucumilla Formation is a Tremadocian geologic formation of southern Bolivia. The sandstones, shales and siltstones crop out in the José María Avilés and Eustaquio Méndez Provinces.

Iscayachi Formation Geologic formation in Bolivia

The Iscayachi Formation, in older literature also referred to as Guanacuno Formation, is an extensive Tremadocian geologic formation of western and southern Bolivia. The shales and sandstones were deposited in a shallow marine to pro-delta environment. The formation reaches a thickness of 1,000 metres (3,300 ft).

Pircancha Formation

The Pircancha Formation is a Floian to Dapingian geologic formation of southern Bolivia. The green mudstones, shales and sandstones were deposited in a shallow to open marine environment. The fossil Pircanchaspis rinconensis is named after the formation.

San Lorenzo Formation, Bolivia

The San Lorenzo Formation is a Dapingian geologic formation of southern Bolivia. The dark gray, greenish, and black shale with thin intercalations of white-yellow quartzites were deposited in an open marine submarine fan environment.

Independencia Formation

The Independencia Formation is a Dapingian geologic formation of western-central Bolivia. The dark to bluish gray schists and phyllites metamorphosed shales were deposited in an open marine environment.

Sella Formation

The Sella Formation is a Dapingian to Darriwilian geologic formation of southern Bolivia. The grey to green bioturbated siltstones interbedded with thin sandstone layers bear lenticular shell beds. Other parts of the formation contain yellow-green limy shales and grey sandy limestones. Coquinas often fill gutter casts and included brachiopods, trilobites, bivalves and nautiloids. The sediments were deposited in an open marine environment. The species Coxiconchia sellaensis was named after the formation.

Cancañiri Formation

The Cancañiri Formation, also named as Cancañiri Tillite, is a Katian to Hirnantian geologic formation of central Bolivia. The pebbly, argillaceous sandstones, shales and siltstones of the up to 1,500 metres (4,900 ft) thick formation, were deposited in a glacial foreshore to deep water turbiditic environment. The formation is named after Cancañiri, a mining town close to Llallagua, where a local legend of a possessed woman is believed. The formation overlies the San Benito Formation in Cochabamba and the Amutara Formation in other parts. The Cancañiri Formation is overlain by the Uncía Formation.

Catavi Formation

The Catavi Formation is a Pridoli to Emsian geologic formation of northern and central Bolivia. The formation comprises a 456 m (1,496 ft) thick succession of fine-grained, olive to brown sandstones and siltstones, shales and black limestones deposited in a shallow to deep marine environment.

Gamoneda Formation

The Gamoneda Formation is an Emsian geologic formation of southern Bolivia. The approximately 340 metres (1,120 ft) thick formation comprises marine micaceous grey siltstones and burrowed grey sandstones and shales.

El Molino Formation

The El Molino Formation is a Maastrichtian geologic formation pertaining to the Puca Group of central Bolivia. The formation comprises fine-grained sandstones and sandy limestones with stromatolites deposited in a shallow marine to lacustrine environment. The formation has provided fossils of Dolichochampsa minima, and ichnofossils of Ankylosauria indet., Ornithopoda indet., Theropoda indet. and Titanosauridae indet. The tracksite of Cal Orcko is the best known example of the ichnofossil locations of the formation. The ichnofossil of Ligabueichnum bolivianum may be attributed to an ankylosaur. The fossil fish species Dasyatis molinoensis is named after the formation.

Lipeón Formation

The Lipeón Formation is a Telychian to Pridoli geologic formation of southern Bolivia and northwestern Argentina. The formation comprises sandstones and siltstones. Plant fossils comprising rhyniophytes are scattered throughout, with some abundant concentrations on micaceous bedding plains. The fossil flora is the oldest of South America. Also present were quite diverse small, irregularly branching fragments possibly the tips of algae such as Buthotrephis or Hungerfordia.

References

  1. San Lucas at Fossilworks.org
  2. Molle Punku, Huerta Maya, and Pantipata at Fossilworks.org

Further reading