Ohio State University Press

Last updated
Ohio State University Press
Parent company Ohio State University
Founded1957
Country of origin United States
Headquarters location Columbus, Ohio
Distribution Chicago Distribution Center [1]
Publication types Books, journals
Official website ohiostatepress.org

The Ohio State University Press is the university press of Ohio State University. [2] It was founded in 1957.

Contents

The OSU Press has published approximately 1700 books since its inception. The current director is Tony Sanfilippo, who had previously worked for over 14 years at the Penn State University Press. [3] OSU Press's book A Mother's Tale, by Phillip Lopate, was widely reviewed by national media in 2017. [4] [5] How to Make a Slave was a finalist for the National Book Award in nonfiction in 2020. [6]

Series/imprints

Series/imprints by OSU press include:

Latinographix

Latinographix [7] was founded in 2017 as an imprint to publish graphic fiction and nonfiction narratives by Latino creators, [8] [9] and satirical studies such as Drawing on Anger: Portraits of U.S. Hypocrisy by Eric J. Garcia. [10] The series also publishes graphic novels on pressing social justice issues, such as sexual abuse and homelessness in Mexico (such as Angelitos by Santiago Cohen and Ilan Stavans), as well as children's books for young people of color (such as Chupacabra Charlie by Frederick Luis Aldama). [11]

Others

  • 21st Century Essays [12]
  • Abnormativities [13]
  • The Academy for Leadership and Governance [14]
  • Classical Memories/Modern Identities [15]
  • Cognitive Approaches to Culture [16]
  • Formations [17]
  • Global Latin/o Americas [18]
  • Interventions [19]
  • Intersectional Rhetorics [20]
  • The Journal Charles B. Wheeler Poetry Prize [21]
  • The Journal Non/Fiction Prize [22]
  • Machete [23]
  • New Directions in Rhetoric and Materiality [24]
  • New Suns [25]
  • Race and Mediated Cultures [26]
  • Studies in Cartoons and Comics [27]
  • Theory and Interpretation of Narrative [28]
  • Mad Creek Books [29]
  • Trillium [30]

Related Research Articles

Piri Thomas was a Puerto Rican-Cuban writer and poet whose memoir Down These Mean Streets became a best-seller.

Puerto Rican literature is the body of literature produced by writers of Puerto Rican descent. It evolved from the art of oral storytelling. Written works by the indigenous inhabitants of Puerto Rico were originally prohibited and repressed by the Spanish colonial government.

Caribbean literature is the literature of the various territories of the Caribbean region. Literature in English from the former British West Indies may be referred to as Anglo-Caribbean or, in historical contexts, as West Indian literature. Most of these territories have become independent nations since the 1960s, though some retain colonial ties to the United Kingdom. They share, apart from the English language, a number of political, cultural, and social ties which make it useful to consider their literary output in a single category. The more wide-ranging term "Caribbean literature" generally refers to the literature of all Caribbean territories regardless of language—whether written in English, Spanish, French, Hindustani, or Dutch, or one of numerous creoles.

Latin American poetry is the poetry written by Latin America authors. Latin American poetry is often written in Spanish, but is also composed in Portuguese, Mapuche, Nahuatl, Quechua, Mazatec, Zapotec, Ladino, English, and Spanglish. The unification of Indigenous and imperial cultures produced a unique and extraordinary body of literature in this region. Later with the introduction of African slaves to the new world, African traditions greatly influenced Latin American poetry. Many great works of poetry were written in the colonial and pre-colonial time periods, but it was in the 1960s that the world began to notice the poetry of Latin America. Through the modernismo movement, and the international success of Latin American authors, poetry from this region became increasingly influential.

Latino poetry is a branch of American poetry written by poets born or living in the United States who are of Latin American origin or descent and whose roots are tied to the Americas and their languages, cultures, and geography.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Frederick Luis Aldama</span>

Frederick Luis Aldama is an American academic, known for this work as the Jacob & Frances Sanger Mossiker Chair in the Humanities, founder and director of the Latinx Pop Lab, and Affiliate Faculty in Radio-TV-Film at the University of Texas, Austin, and Adjunct Professor & Distinguished University Professor at The Ohio State University. He teaches courses on Latinx comics, tv, and film in the departments of English and Radio-Television-Film. At the Ohio State University he was Distinguished University Professor, Arts & Humanities Distinguished Professor of English, University Distinguished Scholar, and Alumni Distinguished Teacher as well as recipient of the Rodica C. Botoman Award for Distinguished Teaching and Mentoring and the Susan M. Hartmann Mentoring and Leadership Award. At the Ohio State University he was founder and director of the award-winning LASER/Latinx Space for Enrichment Research and founder and co-director of the Humanities & Cognitive Sciences High School Summer Institute. Aldama is the creator and curator of the Planetary Republic of Comics.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ilan Stavans</span> Mexican-American author and academic

Ilan Stavans is a Mexican-American author and academic. He writes and speaks on American, Hispanic, and Jewish cultures. He is the author of Quixote (2015) and a contributor to the Norton Anthology of Latino Literature (2010).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">San Diego State University Press</span>

San Diego State University Press is a university press that is part of San Diego State University, with noted specializations in Border Studies, Critical Theory, Latin American Studies, Cultural Studies, and comics. It is the oldest university press in the California State University system. It presently publishes books under two rubrics: CODEX, focused on critical theory, and surTEXT, focused on Latin American/Transamerican Cultural Studies. In 2006, SDSU Press also inaugurated Hyperbole Books, specializing in "publishing cutting-edge, over-the-top experiments in critical theory, literary criticism and graphic narrative."

McOndo is a Latin American literary movement that breaks with the magical realism mode of narration, and counters it with languages borrowed from mass media. The literature of McOndo presents urban Latin American life, in opposition to the fictional rural town of Macondo.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Giannina Braschi</span> Puerto Rican writer

Giannina Braschi is a Puerto Rican poet, novelist, dramatist, and scholar. Her notable works include Empire of Dreams (1988), Yo-Yo Boing! (1998) and United States of Banana (2011).

James Phelan is an American writer, literary scholar, and Distinguished University Professor of English at The Ohio State University. He joined the faculty of Ohio State in 1977 after earning his MA and PhD from the University of Chicago. At the University of Chicago, he studied with the Chicago School theorists Sheldon Sacks and Wayne Booth. In 2013 he was awarded an honorary doctorate from Aarhus University (Denmark), and in 2016 he was inducted into the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. In 2020 the International Society for the Study of Narrative named him the winner of the 2021 Wayne C. Booth Lifetime Achievement Award. The citation for the Award reads in part,"Phelan has influenced generations of narrative theorists and literary scholars, as he has provided a powerful model for thinking about the purposes of literature and reasons and methods to engage with it. In so doing, he has transformed and energized the interdisciplinary field of narrative studies." The recording of the Award ceremony from the May 2021 ISSN Conference can be found at the Society's website.

Speculative fiction is defined as science fiction, fantasy, and horror. Within those categories exists many other subcategories, for example cyberpunk, magical realism, and psychological horror.

The female epic is a concept in literary criticism that seeks to expand generic boundaries by identifying ways in which women authors have adapted the masculine epic tradition to express their own heroic visions.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Caribbean poetry</span> Poem, rhyme, or lyric that derives from the Caribbean region

Caribbean poetry is vast and rapidly evolving field of poetry written by people from the Caribbean region and the diaspora.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">American literature in Spanish</span>

American literature written in Spanish in the United States dates back as 1610 when the Spanish explorer Gaspar Pérez de Villagrá published his epic poem Historia de Nuevo México. He was an early chronicler of the conquest of the Americas and a forerunner of Spanish-language literature in the United States given his focus on the American landscape and the customs of the people. However, it was not until the late 20th century that Spanish language literature written by Americans was regularly published in the United States.

Wendy Rawlings is an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and critic. She is a professor of English at The University of Alabama.

<i>Yo-Yo Boing!</i> Spanglish book by Giannina Braschi

Yo-Yo Boing! (1998) is a postmodern novel in English, Spanish, and Spanglish by Puerto Rican author Giannina Braschi. The cross-genre work is a structural hybrid of poetry, political philosophy, musical, manifesto, treatise, memoir, and drama. The work addresses tensions between Anglo-American and Hispanic-American cultures in the United States.

<i>United States of Banana</i> Post-9/11 dramatic novel by Giannina Braschi

United States of Banana (2011) is a postmodern allegorical novel by the Puerto Rican author Giannina Braschi. It is a cross-genre work that blends experimental theatre, prose poetry, short story, and political philosophy with a manifesto on democracy and American life in a post-9/11 world. The book dramatizes the global war on terror and narrates the author's displacement after the attacks from her home in the Battery Park neighborhood in New York City. The work addresses Latin American immigration to the United States, Puerto Rico's colonial status, and "power imbalances within the Americas."

Latino literature is literature written by people of Latin American ancestry, often but not always in English, most notably by Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, and Dominican Americans, many of whom were born in the United States.

Empire of Dreams is a postmodern poetry epic by Puerto Rican author Giannina Braschi, who is considered "one of the most revolutionary voices in Latin American literature today".

References

  1. "Publishers served by the Chicago Distribution Center". University of Chicago Press. Retrieved 2017-09-12.
  2. "Ohio State University Press on JSTOR". www.jstor.org. Retrieved 2020-10-09.
  3. "New director seeks to grow publishing arm of Ohio State". Columbus Dispatch. March 8, 2015. Retrieved July 12, 2016.
  4. Franklin, Ruth (11 May 2017). "'Just Make Sure You Don't Forget'" via www.nybooks.com.
  5. "Take My Mother, Please! – Los Angeles Review of Books".
  6. "Two University Presses Score NBA Finalists". PublishersWeekly.com. Retrieved 2021-05-14.
  7. "Latinographix". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  8. Aldama, Frederick. "OSU LATINOGRAPHIX".
  9. Lugo Bertan, Dorian (2020). "Leaping Off the PageGiannina Braschi’s Intermedialities," in Poets, Philosophers, Lovers: on the Writings of Giannina Braschi. Aldama, Frederick Luis; Stvans, Ilan; O'Dwyer, Tess. Pittsburgh, Pa.: Pittsburgh. ISBN   978-0-8229-4618-2.
  10. "Book Unveiling: Drawing on Anger by Eric Garcia | National Museum of Mexican Art". nationalmuseumofmexicanart.org. Retrieved 2020-10-09.
  11. THE ADVENTURES OF CHUPACABRA CHARLIE | Kirkus Reviews.
  12. "21st Century Essays". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  13. "Abnormativities". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  14. "The Academy for Leadership and Governance". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  15. "Classical Memories/Modern Identities". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  16. "Cognitive Approaches to Culture". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  17. "Formations: Adoption, Kinship, and Culture". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  18. "Global Latin/o Americas". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  19. "Interventions". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  20. "Intersectional Rhetorics". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  21. "The Journal Charles B. Wheeler Poetry Prize". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  22. "The Journal Non/Fiction Prize". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  23. "Machete". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  24. "New Directions in Rhetoric and Materiality". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  25. "New Suns". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  26. "Race and Mediated Cultures". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  27. "Studies in Cartoons and Comics". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  28. "Theory and Interpretation of Narrative". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  29. "Mad Creek Books". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.
  30. "Trillium". ohiostatepress.org. Ohio State University Press. Retrieved December 5, 2019.