Plain thornbird

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Plain thornbird
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Furnariidae
Genus: Phacellodomus
Species:
P. inornatus
Binomial name
Phacellodomus inornatus
Ridgway, 1887
Phacellodomus rufifrons inornatus map.svg

The plain thornbird (Phacellodomus inornatus) is a species of bird in the ovenbird family Furnariidae.

Contents

Taxonomy

The plain thornbird was formally described in 1887 by the American ornithologist Robert Ridgway based on a specimen collected in Caracas, Venezuela. He coined the binomial name Phacellodomus inornatus. [2] The specific epithet is Latin meaning "plain" or "unadorned". [3]

The plain thornbird is sometimes considered conspecific with the rufous-fronted thornbird (Phacellodomus rufifrons). [4] [5] Support for treating the plain thornbird as a separate species was provided by a 2020 study that compared mitochondrial DNA sequences. [6]

Two subspecies are recognised: [7]

Description

The plain thornbird is 15.5 cm (6.1 in) in length. It is similar in appearance to the rufous-fronted thornbird but lacks the rufous forecrown. [8]

Distribution and habitat

It is found in Venezuela and northeast Columbia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forest, dry savanna, subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland, and heavily degraded former forest.

Related Research Articles

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Tuftedcheek Genus of birds

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Plain xenops Species of bird

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<i>Synallaxis</i> Genus of birds

Synallaxis is a genus of birds in the ovenbird family, Furnariidae. It is one of the most diverse genera in the family and is composed of small birds that inhabit dense undergrowth across tropical and subtropical habitats in the Neotropical region. Some species show contrasting plumage patterns involving rufous crown and wing patches and black throat patches but they are difficult to see as they keep ensconced in vegetation most of the time. Most species show the long graduated tail with pointy feathers that is typical of spinetails. They are also characterized by constructing large domed nests with stick, including a long entrance tube. Some species can be difficult to distinguish from one another on the basis of their plumage, but can be tell apart by their vocalizations, which can be quite distinctive.

Canastero Genus of birds

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Berlepschs canastero Species of bird

Berlepsch's canastero is a species of the ovenbird family, Furnariidae. It is endemic to Bolivia.

Point-tailed palmcreeper Species of bird

The point-tailed palmcreeper is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae, the ovenbirds. It is monotypic, the only member of the genus Berlepschia.

Eastern woodhaunter Species of bird

The eastern woodhaunter, also known as the Amazonian woodhaunter, is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae. It was formerly treated as conspecific with the western woodhaunter and when lumped had the name "striped woodhaunter". It is found in the western part of the Amazon rainforest: west Brazil, southeast Colombia, east Ecuador, northeast Peru, south Venezuela and north Bolivia. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests. The species nests in earth tunnels.

<i>Phacellodomus</i> Genus of birds

Phacellodomus is the genus of thornbirds, birds in the family Furnariidae. They are found in woodland, shrubland and grassland, often near water, in South America.

Orange-breasted thornbird Species of bird

The orange-breasted thornbird, also known as the red-eyed thornbird, is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae. It is found in forest and woodland, especially near water, in southeastern Brazil and adjacent northern Uruguay.

Orange-eyed thornbird Species of bird

The orange-eyed thornbird is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae. It is endemic to the Atlantic Forest in eastern Brazil. It formerly included P. ferrugineigula as a subspecies, but under the common name red-eyed thornbird. After the two were split, that English name was confusingly used for both species briefly, although it only really is fitting for P. ferrugineigula. To avoid this confusion, P. ferrugineigula is now generally called the orange-breasted thornbird. Unlike that species, the orange-eyed thornbird has conspicuously bright orange eyes, far less rufous below and on the crown, and the entire tail rufous. The two also have different voices and are locally sympatric in São Paulo without evidence of interbreeding.

Spot-breasted thornbird Species of bird

The spot-breasted thornbird is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae. It is found in the Southern Andean Yungas. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland.

Rufous-fronted thornbird Species of bird

The rufous-fronted thornbird is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae.

Little thornbird Species of bird

The little thornbird is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae. It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, and Uruguay. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forest and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland.

Streak-fronted thornbird Species of bird

The streak-fronted thornbird is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae. It is found in the eastern half of the Puna grassland. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and subtropical or tropical high-altitude shrubland.

Freckle-breasted thornbird Species of bird

The freckle-breasted thornbird is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae. It is found in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, and Uruguay. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forest, subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, and subtropical or tropical moist shrubland. It was first described by Alcide d'Orbigny and Frédéric de Lafresnaye in 1838, from Uruguay.

White-whiskered spinetail Species of bird

The white-whiskered spinetail is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae. It is found in Colombia and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical dry shrubland.

Western woodhaunter Species of bird

The western woodhaunter is a species of bird in the family Furnariidae.

The descriptive term rufous-fronted is part of the common name of a number of different bird species:

References

  1. BirdLife International (2016). "Plain Thornbird (Phacellodomus inornatus)". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 30 June 2021.
  2. Ridgway, Robert (1887). "Description of a new species of Phacellodomus from Venezuela". Proceedings of the United States National Museum. 10 (619): 152.
  3. Jobling, James A. (2010). The Helm Dictionary of Scientific Bird Names. London: Christopher Helm. p. 205. ISBN   978-1-4081-2501-4.
  4. Dickinson, E.C.; Christidis, L., eds. (2014). The Howard & Moore Complete Checklist of the Birds of the World. Vol. 2: Passerines (4th ed.). Eastbourne, UK: Aves Press. p. 130. ISBN   978-0-9568611-2-2.
  5. Remsen, J.V. Jr (2003). "Proposal 41: Split Phacellodomus inornatus from P. rufifrons". South American Classification Committee, American Ornithologists' Union. Retrieved 30 June 2021.
  6. Corbett, E.C.; Bravo, G.A.; Schunck, F.; Naka, L.N.; Silveira, L.F.; Edwards, S.V. (2020). "Evidence for the Pleistocene Arc Hypothesis from genome-wide SNPs in a Neotropical dry forest specialist, the Rufous-fronted Thornbird (Furnariidae: Phacellodomus rufifrons)". Molecular Ecology. 29 (22): 4457–4472. doi: 10.1111/mec.15640 .
  7. Gill, Frank; Donsker, David; Rasmussen, Pamela, eds. (January 2021). "Ovenbirds, woodcreepers". IOC World Bird List Version 11.1. International Ornithologists' Union. Retrieved 30 June 2021.
  8. Ridgely, Robert S.; Tudor, Guy (2009). Birds of South America: Passerines. Helm Field Guides. London: Christopher Helm. pp. 296, 686. ISBN   978-1-408-11342-4.