Richard E. Eustis

Last updated
Richard E. Eustis
Playing career
1911–1913 Wesleyan
Position(s) Fullback, end
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1914–1915 Wesleyan
1916 NYU
Head coaching record
Overall14–10–2

Richard E. Eustis was an American football player and coach. He played college football for Wesleyan University from 1911 to 1913 and served as the university's head football coach from 1914 to 1915. He also served as the head football coach at New York University (NYU) in 1916.

Contents

Playing career

Eustis was the son of New York Public Service Commissioner John E. Eustis of New York City. [1] Eustis enrolled at Wesleyan University, where he played football as a fullback and end from 1911 to 1913. He was the captain of Wesleyan's 1913 football team. [1] [2] [3] The New York Times described Eustis as "the mainstay on [Wesleyan's] football team for three years, playing full back and end with equal ability." [4]

Coach career

In February 1914, while he was still a student, Eustis was hired as the new head football coach at Wesleyan. [5] He served as Wesleyan's head football coach from 1914 to 1915 and compiled a record of 1071. [6] He graduated from Wesleyan in 1915. In 1916, Eustis was hired as the head football coach at New York University. In his only season as NYU's head coach, he compiled a record of 4–3–1. [7] [8] His brother Elmer T. Eustis was the assistant football coach on the 1914 NYU Violets team. [4]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Wesleyan Methodists (Independent)(1914–1915)
1914 Wesleyan4–4–1
1915 Wesleyan6–3
Wesleyan:10–7–1
NYU Violets (Independent)(1916)
1916 NYU 4–3–1
NYU:4–3–1
Total:14–10–2

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References

  1. 1 2 "Dick Eustis Engaged to Coach Wesleyan: Is Son of New York Public Service Commissioner - Is Ex-Captain". The Day, New London, Conn. 1915-08-26.
  2. "Wesleyan Coach Is Still in College". The Day, New London, Conn. 1914-02-20.
  3. "WESELYAN WANTS NEW COACH: Problem Is to Put an End to Frequent Changing - Dick Eustis, Last Year Captain, Is Strongly Urged". Galveston Daily News. 1914-02-01.
  4. 1 2 "EUSTIS NEW COACH OF N.Y.U. ELEVEN; Wesleyan Football Director Named to Succeed Reilley - First Practice Today After" (PDF). The New York Times. 1916-09-20.
  5. "DICK EUSTIS WILL COACH WESLEYAN: Last Year's Captain First Wesleyan Man to Hold Place; WORK IN HARMONY WITH DR. FAUVER; First Move Towards Establishing Permanent System". The Hartford Courant. 1914-02-20.
  6. "ALL-TIME COACHING RECORDS". Wesleyan University. Archived from the original on June 1, 2010. Retrieved 2010-06-11.
  7. "Richard E. Eustis Records by Year". College Football Data Warehouse.
  8. New York University Violets coaching records