Robert P. Wilson

Last updated
Robert P. Wilson
Playing career
1895–1896 Wesleyan
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1898–1902 Wesleyan
1903 NYU
Head coaching record
Overall27–26–2
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
2 TFL (1899–1900)

Robert P. "Bert" Wilson was an American college football player and coach. He played football for Wesleyan University and was captain of the school's football team in 1896. [1] After graduating, he served as Wesleyan's first head football coach from 1898 to 1902. In five years as Wesleyan's coach, Wilson compiled a record of 25212. [2] In his first two years as the coach, Wesleyan compiled records of 7–3 and 7–2. In the 17 years before Wilson took over as the coach, Wesleyan's football team had never won seven games in a single season. [3] In 1903, Wilson became the head football coach at New York University (NYU). [4] He served the sixth head football coach at NYU and held that position for one season, in 1903, leading the NYU Violets to a record of 2–5. [5]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Wesleyan Methodists (Independent)(1898)
1898 Wesleyan7–3
Wesleyan Methodists (Triangular Football League)(1899–1901)
1899 Wesleyan7–22–01st
1900 Wesleyan5–42–01st
1901 Wesleyan 3–6–11–12nd
Wesleyan Methodists (Independent)(1902)
1902 Wesleyan3–6–1
Wesleyan:25–21–25–1
NYU Violets (Independent)(1903)
1903 NYU 2–5
NYU:2–5
Total:27–26–2
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

Related Research Articles

Fielding H. Yost

Fielding Harris Yost was an American football player, coach and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at: Ohio Wesleyan University, the University of Nebraska, the University of Kansas, Stanford University, San Jose State University, and the University of Michigan, compiling a college football career record of 198–35–12. During his 25 seasons as the head football coach at Ann Arbor, Yost's Michigan Wolverines won six national championships, captured ten Big Ten Conference titles, and amassed a record of 165–29–10.

Dave Fultz American baseball player

David Lewis Fultz was an American football and baseball player and coach. He played Major League Baseball as a center fielder in the National League with the Philadelphia Phillies (1898–1899) and Baltimore Orioles (1899), and for the Philadelphia Athletics (1901–1902) and New York Highlanders (1903–1905) of the American League. He batted and threw right-handed. In a seven-season career, Fultz posted a .271 batting average with 223 RBI and three home runs in 644 games played. Fultz played college football and college baseball at Brown University, from which he graduated in 1898. He served as the head football coach at the University of Missouri (1898–1899), Lafayette College (1902), Brown (1903), and New York University (1904), compiling a career college football coaching record of 26–19–2. Fultz was also the head baseball coach at the United States Naval Academy in 1907 and at Columbia University from 1910 to 1911.

George Little (American football coach)

George Edkin Little was an American football player, and coach of football, basketball, and baseball, and college athletics administrator.

Zora G. Clevenger

Zora G. Clevenger was an American football, basketball, and baseball player, coach, and pioneering athletic director. He served as the head football coach at Nebraska Wesleyan University (1908–1910), the University of Tennessee (1911–1915), and Kansas State University (1916–1919), compiling a record of 47–32–7. Clevenger was also the head basketball coach at Indiana University (1904–1906), Nebraska Wesleyan (1907–1911), Tennessee (1911–1916), and Kansas State (1916–1919), and was baseball coach at Indiana (1905–1906), Nebraska Wesleyan (1908–1911), Tennessee (1911–1916), and Kansas State (1919–1921). Clevenger served as the athletic director at Kansas State (1916–1920), the University of Missouri (1921–1923), and Indiana (1923–1946). He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1968.

John Chalmers (coach)

John George Chalmers was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at Franklin & Marshall College (1902), the University of Iowa (1903–1905), Columbia College in Dubuque, Iowa, now known as Loras College, (1907–1914), and the University of Dubuque (1914–1924), compiling a career college football record of 100–47–8. Chalmers was also the head men's basketball coach at Iowa for one season (1904–1905), tallying a mark of 6–8, and the baseball coach at Iowa for two seasons (1904–1905) and at Columbia College from 1915 to 1921.

Emil Smith "Liz" Liston was an American athletic coach and administrator. He coached basketball, football and baseball at Wesleyan University and Baker University. He was the founder of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, organized the NAIA college basketball tournament in 1937 and served as the first executive director of the National Association of Intercollegiate Basketball from 1940 to 1949. He was posthumously inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1975.

Mal Stevens American football player, coach, naval officer, and orthopedic surgeon

Marvin Allen "Mal" Stevens was an American football player, coach, naval officer, and orthopedic surgeon. He served as the head football coach at Yale University from 1928 to 1932 and at New York University from 1934 to 1941, compiling a career college football record of 54–45–10. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1974.

Frank "Buck" ONeill American football player and coach

Frank J. "Buck" O'Neill was an American football player and coach. He served as head football coach at Colgate University, Williams College (1903), Syracuse University, and Columbia University (1920–1922), compiling a career college football coaching record of 87–45–9. O’Neill was a two-sport athlete at Williams College where he played football and ran track. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1951.

W. H. Rorke was an American football player and coach. He served the fifth head football coach at New York University (NYU). He held that position for two seasons, from 1901 until 1902, leading the NYU Violets to a record of 9–6–1. The one tie game he coached was in the 1901 season against Union on November 23. The game ended in a score of 11–11. He attended Poly Prep Country Day School as well as NYU, playing football at the latter.

Jake C. High was an American football player and coach. He played football at the fullback position for Brown University. He was the head football coach at Wesleyan University in 1912 and has the distinction of having the highest career winning percentage (.778) in the 127-year history of the Wesleyan Cardinals football program. He was also the head football coach at New York University in 1913 and holds the distinction of having the lowest career winning percentage (.000) in the history of the NYU Violets football program.

Richard E. Eustis was an American football player and coach. He played college football for Wesleyan University from 1911 to 1913 and served as the university's head football coach from 1914 to 1915. He also served as the head football coach at New York University (NYU) in 1916.

Harry W. Ewing American football player, athletics coach, and college athletics administrator

Harry Walter "Buck" Ewing was an American football player, coach of football, basketball and baseball, and college athletics administrator. He was a 1909 graduate of University of Nebraska where he played football. Ewing served as the head football coach at Morningside College (1911), South Dakota State College (1912–1917), Ohio Wesleyan University (1919–1921), Miami University (1922–1923), and Otterbein College, compiling a career college football record of 82–82–10. He was also the head basketball coach at South Dakota State, Ohio Wesleyan (1919–1920), Miami (1922–1924), and Otterbein (1942–1952), tallying a career college basketball mark of 117–111–1.

Tom Thorp

Thomas Joseph Thorp was an American football player and coach, sports writer, and football and horse racing official. He served as the head football at Fordham University from 1912 to 1913 and at New York University from 1922 to 1924, compiling a career college football record of 21–17–4.

Edgar Fauver

Edgar Fauver was an American athlete, coach, university administrator and medical doctor. He played football and baseball for Oberlin College in the 1890s. He later served as the athletic director at Wesleyan University from 1911 to 1937. He was also a pioneer in college athletics for women, coaching basketball and introducing baseball at Barnard College in the 1900s.

Danny Hutchinson was an American football player and coach. He played college football for the University of Pennsylvania in 1908 and 1909 and served as the head football coach at Wesleyan University in 1913.

John R. Stiegman was an American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Rutgers University (1956–1959), the University of Pennsylvania (1960–1964) and Iowa Wesleyan College (1973), compiling a career college football record of 37–53.

The 1903 Holy Cross football team was an American football team that represented the College of the Holy Cross in the 1903 college football season. In its first season under head coach Frank Cavanaugh, the team compiled an 8–2 record. Tom Stankard was the team captain.

The 1903 NYU Violets football team was an American football team that represented New York University as an independent during the 1903 college football season. In their only year under head coach Robert P. Wilson, the team compiled a 2–5 record.

The 1916 NYU Violets football team was an American football team that represented New York University as an independent during the 1916 college football season. In their only year under head coach Richard E. Eustis, the team compiled a 4–3–1 record.

References

  1. "Wesleyan's Football Season Starts" (PDF). The New York Times . September 16, 1900. Retrieved April 8, 2014.
  2. "ALL-TIME COACHING RECORDS". Wesleyan University. Retrieved April 8, 2014.
  3. "131 SEASONS OF WESLEYAN FOOTBALL". Wesleyan University. Retrieved April 8, 2014.
  4. "FOOTBALL SEASON WELL STARTED; Colgate Played West Point to a Standstill – Neither Team Scored – Columbia Scored 10 Against Wesleyan – Yale's Easy Victory – Indians' Large Score" (PDF). The New York Times . September 23, 1903. Retrieved April 8, 2014.
  5. The Ultimate Guide to College Football, James Quirk, 2004