Spanish solution

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Spanish solution
Terminal station
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Through station
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Spanish solution: the principle. Passengers board from the left platform, and alight in the middle island. Spaanse methode.svg
Spanish solution: the principle. Passengers board from the left platform, and alight in the middle island.

In railway and rapid transit parlance, the Spanish solution is a station layout with two railway platforms, one on each side of the track. [1] This platform arrangement allows the separation of passenger streams by using one platform only for boarding and the other one only for alighting. [1] The concept of separate platforms for boarding and alighting has been proven effective at stations with high passenger numbers. [2]

Contents

Examples

The term "Spanish solution" derives from its use in several stations of the Madrid Metro (e.g. Avenida de América) and Barcelona Metro (e.g. Sant Andreu).[ citation needed ]

An example of the Spanish Solution is the Marienplatz station on the Munich S-Bahn, with island platform for boarding and side platforms for alighting. [3]

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References

  1. 1 2 Olshausen, Hans-Gustav (9 March 2013). VDI-Lexikon Bauingenieurwesen[VDI-Lexikon civil engineering] (in German) (2nd ed.). Springer-Verlag. p. 63. ISBN   978-3-642-48098-0.
  2. Fendrich, Lothar (25 January 2007). Handbuch Eisenbahninfrastruktur[Railway infrastructure handbook] (in German). Springer-Verlag. pp. 36, 37. ISBN   9783540317074.
  3. Walter, Dirk (1 April 2017). "So wird Münchens zweite S-Bahn-Röhre" [This is how Munich's second S-Bahn-tube will be like]. ovb-online.de (in German). Oberbayerisches Volksblatt GmbH & Co. Medienhaus KG. Retrieved 21 October 2018. At least the new main train station stop and the Marienhof stop are being built with a "Spanish solution", ie with a central platform and an exit to the right for the rapid change of passengers (such as today on Stachus) [via Google automated German-English translation service].