Statistics Estonia

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Statistics Estonia
Estonian: Statistikaamet
Statistikaamet.JPG
Statistikaamet.IMG 1343.JPG
Agency overview
Formed1991 (1991)
Jurisdiction Government of Estonia
HeadquartersTatari 51, Tallinn
59°25′46.27″N24°44′6.73″E / 59.4295194°N 24.7352028°E / 59.4295194; 24.7352028 Coordinates: 59°25′46.27″N24°44′6.73″E / 59.4295194°N 24.7352028°E / 59.4295194; 24.7352028
Agency executive
  • Mart Mägi, Director General
Parent agency Ministry of Finance
Website www.stat.ee

Statistics Estonia (Estonian : Statistikaamet) is the Estonian government agency responsible for producing official statistics regarding Estonia. It is part of the Ministry of Finance.

Contents

The agency has approximately 320 employees. The office of the agency is in Tatari, Tallinn. [1]

Statistics

In November 2018, Statistics Estonia had released a metric of the exports of goods which showed increase by 18% [2] while in December of the same year the industrial producer price index had fallen by .6% in comparison to last month but rose by 1.6%. [3]

According to the Statistics Estonia, it weighed pork production of the country and confirmed that the pork production had decreased from 50,000 tons in 2015 to 38,400 in 2017 as a result of the African swine fever virus . [4] In 2019, Statistics Estonia estimated that there are 1,323,820 people living in the country as of 1 January 2019 which is 4,690 then last year. [5]

See also

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References

  1. "About Statistics Estonia". Statistics Estonia. Retrieved 24 January 2019.
  2. "November exports up 18%, imports 15% on year". EER News. 9 January 2019. Retrieved 24 January 2019.
  3. "December industrial producer price index up 1.6% on year". EER News. 21 January 2019. Retrieved 24 January 2019.
  4. "Former president: Estonia under-producing in pork, could lead in cryonics". EER News. 18 January 2019. Retrieved 24 January 2019.
  5. "Population of Estonia increases by 4,690 in 2018". EER News. 16 January 2019. Retrieved 24 January 2019.