The Missing Rembrandt

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The Missing Rembrandt
"Missing Rembrandt" (1932).jpg
Directed by Leslie S. Hiscott
Written by
Produced by Julius Hagen
Starring
Cinematography
Edited by Jack Harris
Distributed by Twickenham Studios
Release dates
  • February 1932 (1932-02)(UK)
  • 25 March 1932 (1932-03-25)(US)
Running time
84 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

The Missing Rembrandt is a 1932 British mystery film directed by Leslie S. Hiscott and starring Arthur Wontner, Jane Welsh, Miles Mander, and Francis L. Sullivan. [1] It is considered a lost film. [2] [3] The film was loosely based on the 1904 Sherlock Holmes story "The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton" by Arthur Conan Doyle. [4]

Contents

It is the second film in the 1931–1937 film series starring Wontner as Sherlock Holmes. [4]

Plot

Sherlock Holmes goes on the trail of a Rembrandt painting, stolen by a drug-addicted artist.

Cast

Reception

The New York Times reviewer wrote that, though it is "slightly changed as to action and entirely as to title, provides both excitement and laughter" and "brings back a number of screen actors who by this time seem to be perfectly at home in their parts." [5]

See also

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References

  1. "The Missing Rembrandt". British Film Institute. Archived from the original on 14 January 2009.
  2. "The Missing Rembrandt".
  3. McMullen, Kieran (11 October 2012). The Many Watsons. Andrews UK Limited. p. 89. ISBN   9781780923048.
  4. 1 2 Barnes, Alan (2011). Sherlock Holmes on Screen. Titan Books. pp. 119–121. ISBN   9780857687760.
  5. B.W.N. (28 March 1932). "Movie Review: Sherlock Holmes Again". The New York Times.