Thomas Rowe

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Thomas Rowe

Thomas Rowe.jpg
1st Mayor of Manly
In office
15 February 1877 7 February 1879
Succeeded byAlfred Hilder
Alderman on the Manly Municipal Council
In office
13 February 1877 1 October 1880
Succeeded byJames Boscawen Duff
Alderman on the Sydney City Council
In office
2 December 1872 30 November 1876
Preceded by Joseph Raphael
Succeeded by John Young
ConstituencyBourke Ward
Personal details
Born(1829-07-20)20 July 1829
Penzance, Cornwall, England
Died14 July 1899(1899-07-14) (aged 69)
Darling Point, Colony of New South Wales
OccupationArchitect

Thomas Rowe (20 July 1829 – 14 January 1899) was a British-born architect, builder and goldminer who became one of Australia's leading architects of the Victorian era. [1] He was also a politician, who was the first Mayor of Manly

Victorian era period of British history encompassing Queen Victorias reign (1837–1901)

In the history of the United Kingdom, the Victorian era was the period of Queen Victoria's reign, from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901. The era followed the Georgian period and preceded the Edwardian period, and its later half overlaps with the first part of the Belle Époque era of Continental Europe. In terms of moral sensibilities and political reforms, this period began with the passage of the Reform Act 1832. There was a strong religious drive for higher moral standards led by the nonconformist churches, such as the Methodist, and the Evangelical wing of the established Church of England. Britain's relations with the other Great Powers were driven by the colonial antagonism of the Great Game with Russia, climaxing during the Crimean War; a Pax Britannica of international free trade was maintained by the country's naval and industrial supremacy. Britain embarked on global imperial expansion, particularly in Asia and Africa, which made the British Empire the largest empire in history. National self-confidence peaked.

Contents

Biography

Thomas Rowe was born in Penzance, Cornwall, United Kingdom, the eldest son of Richard Rowe and Ursula Mumford, and attended Barnes Academy. At 15 he became a draftsman in his father's building business before the family emigrated to Australia in 1848. From 1857 he practised as an architect in Sydney, Bathurst, Orange, Newcastle and Goulburn. In 1872 he was elected alderman for Bourke Ward of the Sydney City Council, which he held until 1876. During his time on the council he worked on sanitation efforts related to improving the Sydney water supply. Rowe Street, which runs from Pitt Street to Castlereagh Street, was at that time named after him by in a vote by the council. [2] In February 1877 he was elected to the first Manly Municipal Council and was elected first Mayor of Manly, overseeing the first laying-out of the town of Manly, and serving as an alderman until 1880. [3] Rowe was also the founder, and for many years president, of the New South Wales Institute of Architects, and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects in 1884. [4]

Sydney City in New South Wales, Australia

Sydney is the state capital of New South Wales and the most populous city in Australia and Oceania. Located on Australia's east coast, the metropolis surrounds Port Jackson and extends about 70 km (43.5 mi) on its periphery towards the Blue Mountains to the west, Hawkesbury to the north, the Royal National Park to the south and Macarthur to the south-west. Sydney is made up of 658 suburbs, 40 local government areas and 15 contiguous regions. Residents of the city are known as "Sydneysiders". As of June 2017, Sydney's estimated metropolitan population was 5,230,330 and is home to approximately 65% of the state's population.

Bathurst, New South Wales City in New South Wales, Australia

Bathurst is a country town in the Central Tablelands of New South Wales, Australia. It is about 200 kilometres (120 mi) west-northwest of Sydney and is the seat of the Bathurst Regional Council. Bathurst is the oldest inland settlement in Australia and had a population of approximately 35,000 as at the 2016 Census.

Orange, New South Wales City in New South Wales, Australia

Orange is a city in the Central West region of New South Wales, Australia. It is 254 kilometres (158 mi) west of the state capital, Sydney [206 kilometres (128 mi) on a great circle], at an altitude of 862 metres (2,828 ft). Orange had an estimated urban population of 39,755 as of June 2016 making the city a significant regional centre. A significant nearby landmark is Mount Canobolas with a peak elevation of 1,395 metres (4,577 ft) AHD  and commanding views of the district.

As an architect he was often successful in competitions and his firms built commercial premises, large houses and many Methodist churches. He died in 1899 in Mona, a heritage-listed [5] house in Darling Point, New South Wales.

Methodism Group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity

Methodism, also known as the Methodist movement, is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant Christianity which derive their inspiration from the life and teachings of John Wesley. George Whitefield and John's brother Charles Wesley were also significant early leaders in the movement. It originated as a revival movement within the 18th-century Church of England and became a separate denomination after Wesley's death. The movement spread throughout the British Empire, the United States, and beyond because of vigorous missionary work, today claiming approximately 80 million adherents worldwide.

Darling Point, New South Wales Suburb of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Darling Point is a harbourside eastern suburb of Sydney, Australia. It is 4 kilometres east of the Sydney central business district and is part of the local government area of Woollahra Council.

Key works

(Many of the following buildings are heritage-listed): [6]

Artarmon, New South Wales Suburb of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Artarmon is a suburb on the lower North Shore of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia 9 kilometres north-west of the Sydney central business district, in the local government area of the City of Willoughby.

Glebe, New South Wales Suburb of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Glebe is an inner-western suburb of Sydney. Glebe is located 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) southwest of the Sydney central business district and is part of the local government area of the City of Sydney, in the Inner West region.

St Judes Church, Randwick Church in New South Wales, Australia

The St Jude's Church is an active Anglican church in Randwick, a suburb of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. It is part of a significant heritage group that includes the church, cemetery, rectory and original Randwick Borough Chambers, later converted to church use. The group is located on Avoca Street, Randwick, and has a federal heritage listing. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999.

Architectural partners

Harry Ruskin Rowe

The Cabbage Trees, Ruskin Rowe, Avalon (1)The Cabbage Trees Ruskin Rowe.jpg
The Cabbage Trees, Ruskin Rowe, Avalon

Rowe's son Harry Ruskin Rowe was also successful as an architect. One of his most significant achievements was the creation in 1950 of Ruskin Rowe, an estate in the Sydney suburb of Avalon. Rowe acquired a house, The Cabbage Trees, in the estate and used it as a weekender. The estate still exists and is heritage-listed. [14]

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References

  1. J. M. Freeland, Thomas Rowe, pp 68–69, Volume 6, Australian Dictionary of Biography (MUP, 1976)
  2. "Thomas Rowe". Sydney's Aldermen. City of Sydney. Retrieved 22 June 2016.
  3. "MUNICIPALITY OF MANLY". New South Wales Government Gazette (66). 16 February 1877. p. 735. Retrieved 23 June 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  4. "The Late Colonel Rowe". Australian Town and Country Journal . LVIII (1511). New South Wales. 21 January 1899. p. 21. Retrieved 23 June 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  5. State Heritage Website
  6. The Heritage of Australia, Macmillan Company, 1981, pp. 2/34,38,60,61,81,95,99,174,252,260
  7. Hawaii for visitors
  8. Methodist Church (Former) - Newington College, including interiors Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  9. Newington College - Grounds and Founder’s Building, including interiors Retrieved 18 May 2019.
  10. "Petersham Town Hall". NSW Heritage Database. Office of Environment and Heritage. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  11. M. Berry, A History of Colonel Thomas Rowe (B Arch thesis, UNSW, 1969)
  12. "THE IMPERIAL ARCADE". The Sydney Morning Herald (16, 635). 17 July 1891. p. 7. Retrieved 25 October 2016 via National Library of Australia.
  13. J. M. Freeland, The Making of a Profession (Sydney, 1971)
  14. State Heritage Register
Civic offices
New title Mayor of Manly
1877 – 1879
Succeeded by
Alfred Hilder