Thomasia solanacea

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Thomasia solanacea
Curtis's botanical magazine (Plate 1486) (8246958083).jpg
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Malvales
Family: Malvaceae
Genus: Thomasia
Species:
T. solanacea
Binomial name
Thomasia solanacea

Thomasia solanacea is a small shrub which is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia.

Western Australia State in Australia

Western Australia is a state occupying the entire western third of Australia. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean to the north and west, and the Southern Ocean to the south, the Northern Territory to the north-east, and South Australia to the south-east. Western Australia is Australia's largest state, with a total land area of 2,529,875 square kilometres, and the second-largest country subdivision in the world, surpassed only by Russia's Sakha Republic. The state has about 2.6 million inhabitants – around 11 percent of the national total – of whom the vast majority live in the south-west corner, 79 per cent of the population living in the Perth area, leaving the remainder of the state sparsely populated.

It grows to between 0.5 and 3 metres in height. [1] Flowers are produced between September and December in its native range. [1]

The species was first formally described by botanist John Sims in 1812. He gave it the name Lasiopetalum solanaceum. In 1821, Swiss botanist Jaques Étienne Gay transferred the species to the genus Thomasia [2]

John Sims (taxonomist) 1749–1831; English physician and botanist

John Sims was an English physician and botanist. He was born in Canterbury, Kent and was subsequently educated at the Quaker school in Burford, Oxfordshire, he then went on to study medicine at Edinburgh University. Later in life he moved to London(1766) where he worked as a physician, notably he was involved with the birth of Princess Charlotte in which both mother and baby died. He was the first editor of Curtis's Botanical Magazine.

Jaques Étienne Gay was a Swiss-French botanist, civil servant, collector and taxonomist. His name is associated with plants in standardised botanical nomenclature, e.g. Crocus sieberi J.Gay. He was the most famous of the students of botanist Jean François Aimée Gaudin with whom he began collecting plants at the age of 14. He was married to Rosalie Nillion.

<i>Thomasia</i> genus of plants

Thomasia is a genus of plants which are native to southern Australia.

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<i>Thomasia quercifolia</i> species of plant

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<i>Thomasia grandiflora</i> species of plant

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<i>Pultenaea muelleri</i> species of plant

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<i>Grevillea integrifolia</i> species of plant

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T. grandiflora may refer to:

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<i>Lysiosepalum involucratum</i> species of plant

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<i>Thomasia purpurea</i> species of plant

Thomasia purpurea is a small shrub that is endemic to the southwest of Western Australia. It usually grows to between 0.3 and 1.2 metres in height. Pink to purple flowers are produced between April and December in the species' native range.

<i>Thomasia macrocarpa</i> species of plant

Thomasia macrocarpa, commonly known as large-fruited thomasia, is a shrub that is endemic to the southwest of Western Australia. It usually grows to between 0.6 and 2 metres in height. Pink to purple flowers are produced between August and November in the species' native range.

Olearia homolepis is a species of flowering plant in the family Asteraceae, endemic to Western Australia. It grows to between 0.2 and 1 metre high. White or blue flowers appear between July and November in the species' native range.

References

  1. 1 2 "Thomasia solanacea". FloraBase . Western Australian Government Department of Parks and Wildlife.
  2. "Thomasia solanacea". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government.