Thopeutis forbesellus

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Thopeutis forbesellus
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Clade: Euarthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepidoptera
Family: Crambidae
Genus: Thopeutis
Species:T. forbesellus
Binomial name
Thopeutis forbesellus
(Fernald, 1896)
Synonyms
  • Chilo forbesellusFernald, 1896

Thopeutis forbesellus is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Charles H. Fernald in 1896. [1] It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from California, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Brunswick, Ohio, Ontario, Quebec and South Carolina.

Moth Group of mostly-nocturnal insects in the order Lepidoptera

Moths comprise a group of insects related to butterflies, belonging to the order Lepidoptera. Most lepidopterans are moths, and there are thought to be approximately 160,000 species of moth, many of which have yet to be described. Most species of moth are nocturnal, but there are also crepuscular and diurnal species.

Crambidae Family of insects

The Crambidae are the grass moth family of lepidopterans. They are quite variable in appearance, the nominal subfamily Crambinae taking up closely folded postures on grass stems where they are inconspicuous, while other subfamilies include brightly coloured and patterned insects which rest in wing-spread attitudes.

Charles H. Fernald American entomologist, zoologist, naturalist

Charles Henry Fernald was an American entomologist, geologist, and zoologist, who is credited as the first college professor of economic entomology. Fernald grew up at Fernald Point in Mount Desert, Maine, and went on to prepare for college at Maine Wesleyan Seminary before joining the navy in 1862. After receiving a master's degree from Bowdoin College he went on to serve as principal of several academies in Maine. Throughout his career he would document and describe several species of microlepidoptera and in 1886 became the first full-time professor and chair of the natural sciences at what is now the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Fernald Hall and the Fernald Entomological Society at the same institution, are named for him and his son, Henry Torsey Fernald, who would later hold the same position as his father. His wife, Maria Elizabeth Fernald, was a noted entomologist in her own right.

The wingspan is about 30 mm. Adults are on wing from April to August. [2]

Wingspan distance from one wingtip to the other wingtip of an airplane or an animal (insect, bird, bat)

The wingspan of a bird or an airplane is the distance from one wingtip to the other wingtip. For example, the Boeing 777-200 has a wingspan of 60.93 metres, and a wandering albatross caught in 1965 had a wingspan of 3.63 metres, the official record for a living bird. The term wingspan, more technically extent, is also used for other winged animals such as pterosaurs, bats, insects, etc., and other fixed-wing aircraft such as ornithopters. In humans, the term wingspan also refers to the arm span, which is distance between the length from one end of an individual's arms to the other when raised parallel to the ground at shoulder height at a 90º angle. Former professional basketball player Manute Bol stands at 7 ft 7 in (2.31 m) and owns one of the largest wingspans at 8 ft 6 in (2.59 m).

Related Research Articles

Thopeutis is a grass moth genus of subfamily Crambinae, tribe Haimbachiini. Some authors have placed it in the snout moth family (Pyralidae), where all grass moths were once also included, but this seems to be in error.

<i>Thopeutis galleriellus</i> species of insect

Thopeutis galleriellus is a species of moth in the family Crambidae. It is found in Spain, France, Romania, Ukraine, Russia, North Africa, the Near East, India, Sri Lanka, Iran and Iraq.

Elophila nebulosalis, the nebulous munroessa moth, is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Charles H. Fernald in 1887. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from South Carolina to Florida.

Epina alleni is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Charles H. Fernald in 1888. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from Indiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and South Carolina.

Crambus multilinellus, the multinellus grass-veneer, is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Charles H. Fernald in 1887. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Ontario and South Carolina.

Fissicrambus albilineellus is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Charles H. Fernald in 1893. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from southern California.

Loxocrambus coloradellus is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Charles H. Fernald in 1893. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from California and Colorado.

Neodactria zeellus is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Charles H. Fernald in 1885. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from Alberta, Florida, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania and Tennessee.

Parapediasia hulstellus is a moth in the Crambidae family. It was described by Charles H. Fernald in 1885. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from Texas.

Thaumatopsis bolterellus is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Charles H. Fernald in 1887. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from New Mexico and Texas.

Thaumatopsis magnificus is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Charles H. Fernald in 1891. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from New Mexico, Arizona and Colorado.

Daulia magdalena, the glittering Magdalena moth, is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Charles H. Fernald in 1892. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from Alabama and Florida.

<i>Pyrausta inornatalis</i> species of insect

Pyrausta inornatalis, the inornate pyrausta moth, is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Charles H. Fernald in 1885. It is found in United States, where it has been recorded from Arizona, California, Florida, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Texas. It is also found in Mexico.

Pyrausta linealis is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Charles H. Fernald in 1894. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from eastern Washington to California and Nevada.

Donacaula maximellus is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Charles H. Fernald in 1891. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Carolina and South Carolina.

Leptosteges flavicostella is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Charles H. Fernald in 1887. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from Florida, South Carolina and Georgia.

Pogonogenys proximalis is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Charles H. Fernald in 1894. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from California and Nevada.

Choristostigma plumbosignalis is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Charles H. Fernald in 1888. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from British Columbia and Alberta to Arizona and New Mexico, east to South Dakota. The habitat consists of grassland coulees, the Aspen Parkland, as well as wooded areas in boreal forests and mountainous areas.

Diasemiodes nigralis is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Charles H. Fernald in 1892. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from Florida to Texas, with strays north to at least Michigan and Maryland.

References

  1. Nuss, M.; et al. (2003–2017). "GlobIZ search". Global Information System on Pyraloidea. Retrieved March 20, 2018.
  2. "800785.00 – 5473 – Thopeutis forbesellus – (Fernald, 1896)". North American Moth Photographers Group. Mississippi State University. Retrieved March 20, 2018.