Thrapston Station Quarry

Last updated
Thrapston Station Quarry
Site of Special Scientific Interest
Thrapston Station Quarry 3.jpg
Area of Search Northamptonshire
Grid reference SP 999 776 [1]
InterestGeological
Area4.5 hectares [1]
Notification 1986 [1]
Location map Magic Map

Thrapston Station Quarry is a 4.5 hectare geological Site of Special Scientific Interest south of Thrapston in Northamptonshire. [1] [2] It is a Geological Conservation Review site. [3] It was formerly called the Thrapston Midland Railway Station Quarry. [4]

Site of Special Scientific Interest Conservation designation denoting a protected area in the United Kingdom

A Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) in Great Britain or an Area of Special Scientific Interest (ASSI) in the Isle of Man and Northern Ireland is a conservation designation denoting a protected area in the United Kingdom and Isle of Man. SSSI/ASSIs are the basic building block of site-based nature conservation legislation and most other legal nature/geological conservation designations in the United Kingdom are based upon them, including national nature reserves, Ramsar sites, Special Protection Areas, and Special Areas of Conservation. The acronym "SSSI" is often pronounced "triple-S I".

Thrapston town in Northamptonshire, England

Thrapston is a small town in Northamptonshire, England. It is the headquarters of the East Northamptonshire district, and at the time of the 2011 census, had a population of 6,239.

Northamptonshire County of England

Northamptonshire, archaically known as the County of Northampton, is a county in the East Midlands of England. In 2015 it had a population of 723,000. The county is administered by Northamptonshire County Council and by seven non-metropolitan district councils. It is known as "The Rose of the Shires".

This site has the most important remaining Middle Jurassic Cornbrash geological section in the Midlands. It is the type site for the Bathonian Blisworth Clay section, dating to 168 to 166 million years ago, and it has the only complete exposure of this section. Diagnostic ammonites have helped to date the site, which has also yielded important Bryozoan fossils. [4] [5]

The Middle Jurassic is the second epoch of the Jurassic Period. It lasted from about 174 to 163 million years ago. Fossil-bearing rocks from the Middle Jurassic are relatively rare, but some important formations include the Forest Marble Formation in England, the Kilmaluag Formation in Scotland, the Daohugou Beds in China, Itat Formation in Russia, and the Isalo III Formation of western Madagascar.

The Cornbrash Formation is a Middle Jurassic geological formation in England. It ranges in age from Bathonian to Callovian, the uppermost part of the Middle Jurassic. Dinosaur remains are among the fossils that have been recovered from the formation, although none have yet been referred to a specific genus.. The name Cornbrash is an old English agricultural name applied in Wiltshire to a variety of loose rubble or brash which, in that part of the country, forms a good soil for growing corn. The name was adopted by William Smith for a thin band of shelly limestone which, in the south of England, breaks up in the manner indicated. Although only a thin group of rocks, it is remarkably persistent; it may be traced from Weymouth to the Yorkshire coast, but in north Lincolnshire it is very thin, and probably dies out in the neighborhood of the Humber. It appears again, however, as a thin bed in Gristhorpe Bay, Cayton Bay, Wheatcroft, Newton Dale and Langdale. In the inland exposures in Yorkshire it is difficult to follow on account of its thinness, and the fact that it passes up into dark shales in many places the so-called clays of the Cornbrash, with Avicula echinata.

Type locality, also called type area, or type section, is the locality where a particular rock type, stratigraphic unit or mineral species is first identified. If the stratigraphic unit in a locality is layered, it is called a stratotype, whereas the standard of reference for unlayered rocks is the type locality.

The site is on private land with no public access.

Related Research Articles

Thrapston Midland Road railway station is a former railway station on the Kettering, Thrapston and Huntingdon Railway line from Kettering. The station officially closed to Passengers on 15 June 1959. However the actual last passengers left the platform on the 8.30pm from Kettering on the evening of 13 June 1959. The train was hauled by steam locomotive and tender 46467 a Class 2 Ivatt LMS Mogul 2-6-0.

West Hoathly SSSI human settlement in United Kingdom

West Hoathly SSSI is a 0.7-hectare (1.7-acre) geological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Sharpthorne in West Sussex. It is a Geological Conservation Review site.

Ketton Quarries

Ketton Quarries is a 115.6 hectare biological and geological Site of Special Scientific Interest east of Ketton in Rutland. It is a Geological Conservation Review site, and an area of 27.5 hectares is managed by the Leicestershire and Rutland Wildlife Trust.

Warboys Clay Pit

Warboys Clay Pit is a 12.6 hectare geological Site of Special Scientific Interest west of Warboys in Cambridgeshire. It is a Geological Conservation Review site.

Roade Cutting

Roade Cutting is a 15.2 hectare geological Site of Special Scientific Interest along the West Coast Main Line north from Roade in Northamptonshire. It is a Geological Conservation Review site.

Cowthick Quarry

Cowthick Quarry is a 1.4 hectare geological Site of Special Scientific Interest east of Corby in Northamptonshire.

Blisworth Rectory Farm Quarry

Blisworth Rectory Farm Quarry is a 1.0 hectare geological Site of Special Scientific Interest west of Blisworth in Northamptonshire. It is a Geological Conservation Review site.

Finedon Top Lodge Quarry

Finedon Top Lodge Quarry, also known as Finedon Gullet is a 0.9 hectare geological Site of Special Scientific Interest east of Wellingborough in Northamptonshire. It is a Geological Conservation Review site revealing a sequence of middle Jurassic limestones, sandstones and ironstones, and is the type section for a sequence of sedimentary rocks known as the 'Wellingborough Member'. It was created by quarrying for the underlying ironstone for use at Wellingborough and Corby Steelworks; the ore was transported by the 1,000 mm gauge Wellingborough Tramway.

Irchester Old Lodge Pit

Irchester Old Lodge Pit is a 0.4 hectare geological Site of Special Scientific Interest south of Wellingborough in Northamptonshire. It is a Geological Conservation Review site.

Collyweston Slate Mine

Collyweston Slate Mine is a 0.9 hectare geological Site of Special Scientific Interest Northamptonshire. It is a Geological Conservation Review site.

Cranford St John SSSI

Cranford St John SSSI is a 2.8 hectare geological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Cranford St John, east of Kettering in Northamptonshire. It is a Geological Conservation Review site.

Flixton Quarry

Flixton Quarry is a 0.7 hectare geological Site of Special Scientific Interest south-west of Bungay in Suffolk. It is a Geological Conservation Review site.

Enderby Warren Quarry

Enderby Warren Quarry is a 1.7 hectare geological Site of Special Scientific Interest north of Enderby in Leicestershire. It is a Geological Conservation Review site.

Sproxton Quarry

Sproxton Quarry is a 5.4 hectares geological Site of Special Scientific Interest north-east of Sproxton in Leicestershire. It is a Geological Conservation Review site.

Breedon Cloud Wood and Quarry

Breedon Cloud Wood and Quarry is a 63.3 hectares biological and geological Site of Special Scientific Interest north-east of Worthington in Leicestershire. It is a Geological Conservation Review site. An area of 33 hectares is managed as a nature reserve by the Leicestershire and Rutland Wildlife Trust.

Grimston Warren Pit

Grimston Warren Pit is a 6.6-hectare (16-acre) geological Site of Special Scientific Interest east of King's Lynn in Norfolk. It is a Geological Conservation Review site.

Horton Clay Pit

Horton Clay Pit is a 0.4-hectare (0.99-acre) geological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Small Dole in West Sussex. It is a Geological Conservation Review site.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Designated Sites View: Thrapston Station Quarry". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 20 February 2017.
  2. "Map of Thrapston Station Quarry". Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 20 February 2017.
  3. "Thrapston (Bathonian)". Joint Nature Conservation Committee. Retrieved 18 December 2016.
  4. 1 2 "Thrapston Station Quarry citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Archived (PDF) from the original on 22 February 2017. Retrieved 20 February 2017.
  5. "Blisworth Clay Formation". The BGS Lexicon of Named Rock Units — Result Details. British Geological Survey. Archived from the original on 20 August 2017. Retrieved 20 August 2017.

Coordinates: 52°23′17″N0°31′59″W / 52.388°N 0.533°W / 52.388; -0.533

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.