Thrapston Midland Road railway station

Last updated

Thrapston Midland Road
Location
Place Thrapston
Area East Northamptonshire
Operations
Original companyKettering, Thrapston & Huntingdon Railway
Pre-grouping Midland Railway
Post-grouping London, Midland and Scottish Railway
London Midland Region of British Railways
Platforms2
History
1 March 1866Station opened as Thrapstone
1 October 1885Renamed Thrapston
2 June 1924Renamed Thrapston Midland Road
15 June 1959Station closed to passengers [1]
28 October 1963Station closed to goods [2]
Disused railway stations in the United Kingdom
Closed railway stations in Britain
A B C D–F G H–J K–L M–O P–R S T–V W–Z

Thrapston Midland Road railway station is a former railway station on the Kettering, Thrapston and Huntingdon Railway line from Kettering. The station officially closed to Passengers on 15 June 1959. However the actual last passengers left the platform on the 8.30pm from Kettering on the evening of 13 June 1959. The train was hauled by steam locomotive and tender 46467 a Class 2 Ivatt LMS Mogul 2-6-0. [3]

Thrapston Station Quarry, formerly called Thrapston Midland Railway Station Quarry, is a geological Site of Special Scientific Interest. [4]

Loudspeaker.svg A sound recording of the last passenger train to leave Thrapston Midland Road Station in 1959  


Preceding station Disused railways Following station
Twywell   Midland Railway
Kettering to Huntingdon Line
  Raunds

See also

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Thrapston Station Quarry

Thrapston Station Quarry is a 4.5 hectare geological Site of Special Scientific Interest south of Thrapston in Northamptonshire. It is a Geological Conservation Review site. It was formerly called the Thrapston Midland Railway Station Quarry.

The Kettering, Thrapston and Huntingdon Railway was an English railway line opened throughout in 1866. It connected the Midland Railway main line at Kettering to ironstone deposits to the south-east of the town, as well as opening up the agricultural district around Thrapston and reaching the regional centre of Huntingdon. The hoped-for expansion of agricultural was limited and local traffic did not develop; at the same time the difficult alignment and gradients of the line discouraged heavy use as a through line. A basic passenger service operated through from Kettering to Cambridge, by using running powers east of Huntingdon via St Ives.

References

  1. Butt, R.V.J., (1995) The Directory of Railway Stations, Yeovil: Patrick Stephens
  2. Clinker, C.R. (October 1978). Clinker's Register of Closed Passenger Stations and Goods Depots in England, Scotland and Wales 1830-1977. Bristol: Avon-AngliA Publications & Services. p. 135. ISBN   0-905466-19-5.
  3. Wally Jacques, Contemporaneous Audio Record (1959)
  4. "Thrapston Station Quarry citation" (PDF). Sites of Special Scientific Interest. Natural England. Retrieved 20 February 2017.

Coordinates: 52°23′23″N0°32′16″W / 52.3898°N 0.5379°W / 52.3898; -0.5379