Three Loves Has Nancy

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Three Loves Has Nancy
Three Loves Has Nancy 1938.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Richard Thorpe
Produced by Norman Krasna
Written by Bella and Samuel Spewack
George Oppenheimer
David Hertz
Starring Janet Gaynor
Robert Montgomery
Franchot Tone
Music by William Axt
Cinematography William H. Daniels
Edited by Frederick Y. Smith
Distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release date
  • September 2, 1938 (1938-09-02)
Running time
70 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Three Loves Has Nancy is a 1938 romantic comedy film directed by Richard Thorpe and starring Janet Gaynor, Robert Montgomery and Franchot Tone. It is set in New York City.

Contents

Plot

The seduction plans of novelist Malcolm Niles go awry when actress Vivian Herford brings along her mother to a candlelight dinner in his New York apartment. When they talk of marriage, Malcolm decides to make a tour promoting his new book, and in a small southern town meets Nancy Briggs at an autographing session at the local bookstore. Nancy is getting married that night, but her fiancé, working in New York, doesn't come back for the wedding, so her family gives her the fare to go to New York to find him. At the same time, Malcolm gets a wire from his publisher and friend, Robert Hanson, telling him to come home because Vivian has left town. Traveling to New York on the same train, Nancy proves to be a pest who Malcolm hopes to avoid once they arrive, but when Nancy can't find her fiancé, she goes to Malcolm, since he's the only one she knows in the city. He is about to kick her out when Vivian returns, so he uses Nancy as an excuse to get rid of Vivian. Further comedy ensues.

Cast

Lobby card Three Loves Has Nancy.jpg
Lobby card


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