Three Rivers, New Mexico

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Three Rivers
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Three Rivers
Location within the state of New Mexico
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Three Rivers
Three Rivers (the United States)
Coordinates: 33°19′17″N106°04′30″W / 33.32139°N 106.07500°W / 33.32139; -106.07500 Coordinates: 33°19′17″N106°04′30″W / 33.32139°N 106.07500°W / 33.32139; -106.07500
Country United States
State New Mexico
County Otero County
Elevation
4,570 ft (1,390 m)
Time zone UTC-7 (Mountain (MST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-6 (CDT)
GNIS feature ID920716 [1]

Three Rivers is an unincorporated community in Otero County, New Mexico, United States. Its elevation is 4,570 feet (1,393 m). [1]

Notable people

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References

  1. 1 2 "Three Rivers, New Mexico". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey.