Thrombopoietic agent

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Thrombopoietic agents are drugs that induce the growth and maturation of megakaryocytes. [1] Some of them are currently in clinical use: romiplostim, [2] eltrombopag, oprelvekin (a recombinant interleukin 11) and thrombopoietin. Several others are under clinical investigation such as lusutrombopag and avatrombopag.

Megakaryocyte

A megakaryocyte is a large bone marrow cell with a lobated nucleus responsible for the production of blood thrombocytes (platelets), which are necessary for normal blood clotting. Megakaryocytes usually account for 1 out of 10,000 bone marrow cells in normal people, but can increase in number nearly 10-fold during the course of certain diseases. Owing to variations in combining forms and spelling, synonyms include megalokaryocyte and megacaryocyte.

Romiplostim pharmaceutical drug

Romiplostim is a fusion protein analog of thrombopoietin, a hormone that regulates platelet production.

Eltrombopag chemical compound

Eltrombopag is a medication that has been developed for certain conditions that lead to thrombocytopenia. It is a small molecule agonist of the c-mpl (TpoR) receptor, which is the physiological target of the hormone thrombopoietin. Eltrombopag was discovered as a result of research collaboration between GlaxoSmithKline and Ligand Pharmaceuticals. Designated an orphan drug in the United States and European Union, it is being manufactured and marketed by Novartis under the trade name Promacta in the USA and is marketed as Revolade in the EU. Novartis acquired the drug as a part of its asset swap deal with GlaxoSmithKline.

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References

  1. Michael Clinton Perry. The Chemotherapy Source Book. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2008 pg. 51
  2. Romiplostim