Thumatha senex

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Thumatha senex
Thumatha senex.jpg
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepidoptera
Superfamily: Noctuoidea
Family: Erebidae
Genus: Thumatha
Species:
T. senex
Binomial name
Thumatha senex
(Hübner, 1808)
Synonyms
  • Bombyx senexHübner, [1808]
  • Nudaria rotundaHaworth, 1809
  • Comacla senex
  • Comacla senex karvajszkyiDiószeghy, 1923

Thumatha senex, the round-winged muslin, is a moth of the family Erebidae. It is found in northern and central Europe, the Alps, northern Asia Minor, the Crimea and south-western Siberia.

Moth Group of mostly-nocturnal insects in the order Lepidoptera

Moths comprise a group of insects related to butterflies, belonging to the order Lepidoptera. Most lepidopterans are moths, and there are thought to be approximately 160,000 species of moth, many of which have yet to be described. Most species of moth are nocturnal, but there are also crepuscular and diurnal species.

Erebidae family of insects

The Erebidae are a family of moths in the superfamily Noctuoidea. The family is among the largest families of moths by species count and contains a wide variety of well-known macromoth groups. The family includes the underwings (Catocala); litter moths (Herminiinae); tiger, lichen, and wasp moths (Arctiinae); tussock moths (Lymantriinae), including the arctic woolly bear moth ; piercing moths ; micronoctuoid moths (Micronoctuini); snout moths (Hypeninae); and zales, though many of these common names can also refer to moths outside the Erebidae. Some of the erebid moths are called owlets.

Alps Major mountain range system in Central Europe

The Alps are the highest and most extensive mountain range system that lies entirely in Europe, separating Southern from Central and Western Europe and stretching approximately 1,200 kilometres (750 mi) across eight Alpine countries : France, Switzerland, Monaco, Italy, Liechtenstein, Austria, Germany, and Slovenia. The mountains were formed over tens of millions of years as the African and Eurasian tectonic plates collided. Extreme shortening caused by the event resulted in marine sedimentary rocks rising by thrusting and folding into high mountain peaks such as Mont Blanc and the Matterhorn. Mont Blanc spans the French–Italian border, and at 4,810 m (15,781 ft) is the highest mountain in the Alps. The Alpine region area contains about a hundred peaks higher than 4,000 metres (13,000 ft).

Contents

Technical description and variation

The wingspan is 15–20 mm. Not unlike Nudaria mundana ( mundana has less-rounded forewings and a more transparent appearance, less obvious spots). The central spot at the apex of the cell distinct; a larger shadowy spot at the middle of the costa, and before the marginal area of the forewing a row of spots which are especially distinct in the costal region. Another curved row of spots bounds the basal third of the forewing. [1] The wings are sparsely scaled, giving them a thin, papery appearance.

Wingspan distance from the tip of one limb such as an arm or wing to the tip of the paired limb, or analogically the same measure for airplane wings

The wingspan of a bird or an airplane is the distance from one wingtip to the other wingtip. For example, the Boeing 777-200 has a wingspan of 60.93 metres, and a wandering albatross caught in 1965 had a wingspan of 3.63 metres, the official record for a living bird. The term wingspan, more technically extent, is also used for other winged animals such as pterosaurs, bats, insects, etc., and other fixed-wing aircraft such as ornithopters. In humans, the term wingspan also refers to the arm span, which is distance between the length from one end of an individual's arms to the other when raised parallel to the ground at shoulder height at a 90º angle. Former professional basketball player Manute Bol stands at 7 ft 7 in (2.31 m) and owns one of the largest wingspans at 8 ft 6 in (2.59 m).

<i>Nudaria mundana</i> Species of moth

Nudaria mundana, the muslin footman, is a moth of the subfamily Arctiinae. It is found in Europe and Anatolia.

Habitat in Ireland HabitatHilden (15).JPG
Habitat in Ireland

Biology

Adults are on wing from mid-June to mid-August in one generation.

Egg round, yellow. Larva ashy grey, very hairy, with black head. The larvae feed on lichen (especially Peltigera canina ) and mosses. Pupa stumpy, dark brown, in a dense hairy cocoon.

Lichen Symbiosis of fungi with algae or cyanobacteria

A lichen is a composite organism that arises from algae or cyanobacteria living among filaments of multiple fungi species in a mutualistic relationship. The combined lichen has properties different from those of its component organisms. Lichens come in many colors, sizes, and forms. The properties are sometimes plant-like, but lichens are not plants. Lichens may have tiny, leafless branches (fruticose), flat leaf-like structures (foliose), flakes that lie on the surface like peeling paint (crustose), a powder-like appearance (leprose), or other growth forms.

The moths fly on damp meadows, and are not rare in their flight-places; they come to the light at night.

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References

  1. Seitz, A. Ed. Die Großschmetterlinge der Erde, Verlag Alfred Kernen, Stuttgart Band 2: Abt. 1, Die Großschmetterlinge des palaearktischen Faunengebietes, Die palaearktischen Spinner und Schwärmer, 1912-1913