Thysanotus scaber

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Thysanotus scaber
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Monocots
Order: Asparagales
Family: Asparagaceae
Subfamily: Lomandroideae
Genus: Thysanotus
Species:T. scaber
Binomial name
Thysanotus scaber
Endl.

Thysanotus scaber is a herbaceous perennial flowering plant with tall stems accompanied with a cluster of foliage underneath. This plant is endemic to the Southwest Australia. The flowers of this plant are bright mauve and there are 3 petals each decorated with fringed edges.

Endemism ecological state of being unique to a defined geographic location or habitat

Endemism is the ecological state of a species being unique to a defined geographic location, such as an island, nation, country or other defined zone, or habitat type; organisms that are indigenous to a place are not endemic to it if they are also found elsewhere. The extreme opposite of endemism is cosmopolitan distribution. An alternative term for a species that is endemic is precinctive, which applies to species that are restricted to a defined geographical area.

Contents

Distribution

Thysanotus scaber originates from Southwestern Australia, East of Perth. It is considered to distributed in the IBRA regions, Jarrah Forest and the Swan Coastal Plain. The Government of Western Australia's Department of Environment and Conservation considers the plants conservation code to be, "not threatened". [1]

Government of Western Australia state government of Western Australia

The Government of Western Australia, formally referred to as Her Majesty's Government of Western Australia, is the Australian state democratic administrative authority of Western Australia. It is also commonly referred to as the WA Government or the Western Australian Government. The Government of Western Australia, a parliamentary constitutional monarchy, was formed in 1890 as prescribed in its Constitution, as amended from time to time. Since the Federation of Australia in 1901, Western Australia has been a state of the Commonwealth of Australia, and the Constitution of Australia regulates its relationship with the Commonwealth. Under the Australian Constitution, Western Australia ceded legislative and judicial supremacy to the Commonwealth, but retained powers in all matters not in conflict with the Commonwealth.

Department of Environment and Conservation (Western Australia) defunct state government department of Western Australia

The Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) was a department of the Government of Western Australia that was responsible for implementing the state's conservation and environment legislation and regulations. It was formed on 1 July 2006 by the amalgamation of the Department of Environment and the Department of Conservation and Land Management.

The Declared Rare and Priority Flora List is the system by which Western Australia's conservation flora are given a priority. Developed by the Government of Western Australia's Department of Environment and Conservation, it is used extensively within the department, including the Western Australian Herbarium. The herbarium's journal, Nuytsia, which has published over a quarter of the state's conservation taxa, requires a conservation status to be included in all publications of new Western Australian taxa that appear to be rare or endangered.

Habitat and ecology

Thysanotus scaber flourishes is a dry climate with low humidity. This plant grows in a region that has a Mediterranean climate with wet winters and dry summers. [2] The native environment of the plant is Eucalypt woodlands. [3] Thysanotus scaber is able to grow in soil that has excellent drainage, but is also able to grow in more sandy soil. However, if the soil is too fine, it may cause the roots to rot. [4]

Mediterranean climate climate zone

A Mediterranean climate or dry summer climate is characterized by rainy winters and dry summers, with less than 40 mm of precipitation for at least three summer months. While the climate receives its name from the Mediterranean Basin, these are generally located on the western coasts of continents, between roughly 30 and 43 degrees north and south of the equator, typically between oceanic climates towards the poles, and semi-arid and arid climates towards the equator.

Morphology

Thysanotus scaber is monoecious and is attached to the ground by tuberous roots. Its leaves are usually thin and grass like. The inflorescence tends to be raceme or panicle with bisexual flowers. The plant has linear sepals, 3 mm (0.12 in) wide and elliptical petals that are 8 mm (0.31 in) wide. This plant is usually distinguished by its few, erect, rough textured leaves. [5] Each flower usually contains 6 stamens with the inner stamens usually reduced. This species has short filaments and stigmas. There are 3 ovaries each with 2 ovules. [6]

Tuber structures in some plant species used as storage organs for nutrients

Tubers are enlarged structures in some plant species used as storage organs for nutrients. They are used for the plant's perennation, to provide energy and nutrients for regrowth during the next growing season, and as a means of asexual reproduction. Stem tubers form thickened rhizomes or stolons. Common plant species with stem tubers include potato and yam. Some sources also treat modified lateral roots under the definition; these are encountered in sweet potato, cassava, and dahlia.

Fruits and seeds

Fruits are seen as capsules and longitudinally dehiscent along the capsule wall. The seeds are spherical and black. [6]

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References

  1. Paczkowska, Grazyna. "Thysanotus scabers R.Br". Department of Environment and Conservation, Western Australian Herbarium. Retrieved 27 April 2012.
  2. Bureau of Meteorology, Australian Government. "Climate of Western Australia". Commonwealth of Australia. Archived from the original on 17 March 2009. Retrieved 27 April 2012.
  3. Brittan, N.H. "Occurrence Record: PERTH:PERTH2979748". Atlas of Living Australia. Retrieved 1 May 2012.
  4. "Thysanotus". The Ramm Botanicals Trust.
  5. Brittan, N.H. "Thysanotus scaber". Flora of Australia Online. Retrieved 1 May 2012.
  6. 1 2 Brands, S.J. "Thysanotus scaber". zipcodezoo.com. Retrieved 27 April 2012.