Tibetan bunting

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Tibetan bunting
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Emberizidae
Genus: Emberiza
Species:
E. koslowi
Binomial name
Emberiza koslowi
Bianchi, 1904

The Tibetan bunting (Emberiza koslowi) is a species of bird in the family Emberizidae. It is endemic to eastern side of the Tibetan Plateau. [1]

Contents

Etymology

The specific name "koslowi" for this species was given after Russian explorer Pyotr Kozlov. [2]

Description

The crown is black and there are white stripes at the head. The back is chestnut coloured. [3]

Behaviour

The domed nest structure of this species appears to be unique amongst the Emberizinae buntings which have open nest structures. [4] Female lays 3 or 4 eggs. [3]

They eat grains in winter and insects, like butterflies, grasshoppers and beetles, in summer. [3]

Main predators of Tibetan bunting are birds of prey like falcons and owls and mammals like foxes, weasels and badgers. [3]

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Pallass reed bunting

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The corn bunting is a passerine bird in the bunting family Emberizidae, a group now separated by most modern authors from the finches, Fringillidae. This is a large bunting with heavily steaked buff-brown plumage. The sexes are similar but the male is slightly larger than the female. Its range extends from Western Europe and North Africa across to northwestern China.

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Pine bunting

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Little bunting

The little bunting is a passerine bird belonging to the bunting family (Emberizidae).

Black-faced bunting

The black-faced bunting is a passerine bird in the bunting family Emberizidae, a group now separated by most modern authors from the finches, Fringillidae.

Black-headed bunting

The black-headed bunting is a passerine bird in the bunting family Emberizidae. It breeds in south-east Europe east to Iran and migrates in winter mainly to India, with some individuals moving further into south-east Asia. Like others in its family, it is found in open grassland habitats where they fly in flocks in search of grains and seed. Adult males are well marked with yellow underparts, chestnut back and a black head. Adult females in breeding plumage look like duller males. In other plumages, they can be hard to separate from the closely related red-headed bunting and natural hybridization occurs between the two species in the zone of overlap of their breeding ranges in northern Iran.

Rock bunting

The rock bunting is a passerine bird in the bunting family Emberizidae, a group now separated by most modern authors from the finches, Fringillidae.

House bunting

The house bunting is a passerine bird in the bunting family Emberizidae.

Wildlife of Ladakh

The flora and fauna of Ladakh was first studied by Ferdinand Stoliczka, an Austrian Czech palaeontologist, who carried out a massive expedition in the region in the 1870s. The fauna of Ladakh have much in common with that of Central Asia generally, and especially those of the Tibetan Plateau. An exception to this are the birds, many of which migrate from the warmer parts of India to spend the summer in Ladakh. For such an arid area, Ladakh has a great diversity of birds — a total of 318 species have been recorded. Many of these birds reside or breed at high-altitude wetlands such as Tso Moriri.

Chestnut-eared bunting

The chestnut-eared bunting, also called grey-headed bunting or grey-hooded bunting, with the latter name also used for grey-necked bunting, is a passerine bird in the bunting family Emberizidae.

Striolated bunting

The striolated bunting is a passerine bird in the bunting family Emberizidae, a group now separated by most modern authors from the finches, Fringillidae.

Meadow bunting

The meadow bunting or Siberian meadow bunting is a passerine bird of eastern Asia which belongs to the genus Emberiza in the bunting family Emberizidae.

Grey-necked bunting

The grey-necked bunting, sometimes referred to as grey-hooded bunting is a species of bird in the family Emberizidae. It breeds along a wide distribution range from the Caspian Sea to the Altai Mountains in Central Asia and winters in parts of Southern Asia. Like other buntings it is found in small flocks.

Cinnamon-breasted bunting

The cinnamon-breasted bunting or cinnamon-breasted rock-bunting, is a species of bird in the family Emberizidae.

References

  1. 1 2 BirdLife International (2012). "Emberiza koslowi". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . 2012. Retrieved 26 November 2013.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  2. Beolens, Bo; Michael Watkins; Mike Grayson (2009). The Eponym Dictionary of Mammals . The Johns Hopkins University Press. p.  229. ISBN   978-0-8018-9304-9.
  3. 1 2 3 4 McKenna, Phil (October 2011). "A Buddhist Monk Saves One of the World's Rarest Birds". Smithsonian Magazine. Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 31 December 2012.
  4. Thewlis, R.M.; R.P. Martins (2000). "Observations of the breeding biology and behaviour of Kozlov's Bunting Emberiza koslowi" (PDF). Forktail. 16: 57–59. Archived from the original (PDF) on 10 June 2011. Retrieved 31 December 2012.