Tielt Formation

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Tielt Formation
Stratigraphic range: Ypresian
~53  Ma
O
S
D
C
P
T
J
K
Pg
N
Type Geological formation
Unit of Ieper Group
Sub-unitsEgemkapel & Kortemark Members
Underlies Hyon Formation
Overlies Kortrijk Formation
Thicknessup to 25 m (82 ft)
Lithology
Primary Sandstone
Location
Region Hainaut, West-, East Flanders, Flemish & Walloon Brabant
CountryFlag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium
Extent Campine Basin
Type section
Named for Tielt
Region West Flanders

The Tielt Formation (Dutch : Formatie van Tielt; French : Formation de Tielt; abbreviation: Tt; named after the town of Tielt in West Flanders) is a geologic formation in the subsurface of Belgium. The formation crops out in the north of Hainaut, in the southern and central parts of West- and East Flanders and in Walloon and Flemish Brabant. It consists of marine very fine sand and silt, deposited in the shallow sea that covered Belgium during the middle and late Ypresian age (early Eocene, about 53 million years ago). [1] [2]

Contents

Description

The Tielt Formation is 25 m (82 ft) thick at most. It is subdivided into two members: the Kortemark and Egemkapel Members. The formation lies stratigraphically on top of the Kortrijk Formation (early Ypresian sandy clay and silt). In the northwestern part of Belgium, the Gentbrugge Formation (late Ypresian marine clay and silt) covers the Tielt Formation. If the Gentbrugge Formation is absent, the younger Brussel Formation (Lutetian calcareous sand) is directly found on top of the Tielt Formation. [1] [2]

See also

Related Research Articles

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Ieper Group

The Ieper Group is a group of rock strata in the subsurface of northwest Belgium. The group is subdivided into three marine formations, all formed during the Ypresian, a single age of the geologic timescale. Both age and group are named after the West-Flemish town of Ypres, for which the Dutch name is "Ieper".

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The Rupel Group is a stratigraphic group of rock strata in the subsurface of Belgium. It is subdivided into three formations that are all marine deposits of Oligocene age.

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The Gentbrugge Formation is a geologic formation in the west of Belgium. The formation crops out in East- and West-Flanders and also occurs in the subsurface of the province of Antwerpen. It consists of marine clay, silt and sand, deposited in the shallow sea that covered northern Belgium during the Ypresian age.

The Kortrijk Formation is a geologic formation in the Belgian subsurface. This formation crops out in northern Hainaut, southern West- and East-Flanders and in Walloon Brabant. The formation consists of marine clay from the Ypresian age.

The Voort Formation or Voort Member is a stratigraphic unit in the subsurface of north Belgium and the south of the Netherlands. The unit has the status of a formation in Belgium but is seen as a member of the Veldhoven Formation in the Netherlands. The Voort Formation consists of shallow marine sands with a late Oligocene age.

The Maldegem Formation is a geologic formation in the Belgian subsurface. The formation consists of alternating marine clay and sand strata, deposited during the late Eocene.

The Brussel Formation is a geologic formation in the subsurface of central Belgium. The formation is named after the Belgian capital, Brussels. It consists of shallow marine sandstone and calcareous sands, deposited in the sea that covered Belgium 45 million years ago, in the Eocene.

The Lede Formation is a geologic formation in the subsurface of Belgium. The formation is named after the town of Lede in East Flanders. It consists of shallow-marine limestone and sandstone, deposited in the former sea that covered Belgium during the Eocene.

The Tongeren Group is a lithostratigraphic unit in the subsurface of Belgium. It consists of shallow marine, epicontinental and/or continental clays and sands from the late Eocene to early Oligocene epochs.

References

  1. 1 2 Steurbaut, 2006, p.76
  2. 1 2 Tielt Formation - National Commission on the Stratigraphy of Belgium

Bibliography