Tigert Hall

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Tigert Hall
Dsg UF Administration Tigert Hall 20050507.jpg
Tigert Hall
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Location Gainesville, Florida
Coordinates 29°38′58″N82°20′24″W / 29.64944°N 82.34000°W / 29.64944; -82.34000 Coordinates: 29°38′58″N82°20′24″W / 29.64944°N 82.34000°W / 29.64944; -82.34000
Built19491950
ArchitectJefferson Hamilton
Architectural styleModified Collegiate Gothic

Tigert Hall, built in the late 1940s and early 1950s, is a historic administrative building located on the eastern edge of the University of Florida campus in Gainesville, Florida. It was designed by architect Jefferson Hamilton in a modified Collegiate Gothic style to function as the university's main administration building. In 1960, it was renamed for John J. Tigert, the university's third president, who served from 1928 to 1947. [1] Tigert Hall faces S.W. Thirteenth Street (U.S. 441), one of the major public roads adjoining the university's campus.

Tigert Hall became a contributing property in the University of Florida Campus Historic District in 2008; the historic district had been previously added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 20, 1989. [2] [3]

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References

  1. Kevin M. McCarthy & Murray D. Laurie, Guide to the University of Florida and Gainesville, Pineapple Press, Sarasota, Florida, p. 141 (1977).
  2. National Park Service Weekly Update on July 3, 2008
  3. Nathan Crabbe, "Nine sites added to UF's historic district," Gainesville Sun (July 16, 2008). Retrieved January 6, 2009.