Time in Switzerland

Last updated

Switzerland uses Central European Time (CET) during the winter as standard time, which is one hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC+01:00), and Central European Summer Time (CEST) during the summer as daylight saving time, which is two hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC+02:00). [1]

Contents

History

The electrical telegraph was introduced in Switzerland in 1851, which allowed near real-time communication, especially amongst post offices. By July 1853, all telegraph and post offices across Switzerland were using Bernese time, [2] a local mean time measured from the Zytglogge clocktower [3] at UTC+00:29:45.5. [lower-alpha 1] Bernese time was also used on train timetables by at least 1873. [5] On 1 June 1894, UTC+01:00 was officially adopted nationwide. [6] Daylight saving time was first attempted between 1941 and 1942, by moving the clocks forward one hour at 01:00 on the first Monday in May, and back again at 02:00 on the first Monday in October.[ citation needed ] The decision to observe daylight saving time was made by the Federal Council on behalf of the recommendation of the Federal Chancellery. [7]

Whilst DST was introduced in much of Western Europe in the spring of 1980, Switzerland did not implement DST until the following year. This resulted in there being a one hour time difference between Switzerland and most of Western Europe, including all of the bordering countries (with the exception of Liechtenstein) for around six months in 1980.[ citation needed ]

The German village of Büsingen am Hochrhein, a small exclave, entirely surrounded by Swiss territory, did not implement DST in 1980 either and observed the same time as Switzerland, meaning there was a one hour time difference between this village and the rest of Germany. The zone Europe/Busingen was created in the 2013a release of the tz database, [8] because since the Unix time epoch in 1970, Büsingen has shared clocks with Zurich. [9]

Since 1981 the shifts to DST occur on the date as specified for European Summer Time.[ citation needed ]

Solar time

The difference of longitude between the western and easternmost points of Switzerland is equivalent to 4°32′09″, resulting in a difference of approximately 18 minutes of solar time.[ citation needed ]

IANA time zone database

The IANA time zone database contains one zone for Switzerland in the file zone.tab, named Europe/Zurich. Columns marked with * are the columns from zone.tab itself.[ citation needed ]

c.c.*Coordinates*TZ*Comments* UTC offset UTC DST offset
CH +4723+00832 Europe/Zurich Swiss time+01:00+02:00

Computers not supporting "Europe/Zurich" may use the older POSIX syntax: TZ='CET-1CEST,M3.5.0/2,M10.5.0/3'[ citation needed ]

Related Research Articles

Central European Time Standard time (UTC+01:00)

Central European Time (CET) is a standard time which is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). The time offset from UTC can be written as UTC+01:00. It is used in most parts of Europe and in a few North African countries. CET is also known as Middle European Time and by colloquial names such as Amsterdam Time, Berlin Time, Brussels Time, Madrid Time, Paris Time, Rome Time, Warsaw Time or even Romance Standard Time (RST).

Summer time in Europe Variation of standard clock time

Summer time in Europe is the variation of standard clock time that is applied in most European countries in the period between spring and autumn, during which clocks are advanced by one hour from the time observed in the rest of the year, with a view to making the most efficient use of seasonal daylight. It corresponds to the notion and practice of daylight saving time (DST) to be found in many other parts of the world.

Central European Summer Time Daylight savings time in the central European time zone

Central European Summer Time (CEST), sometimes referred to as Central European Daylight Time (CEDT), is the standard clock time observed during the period of summer daylight-saving in those European countries which observe Central European Time during the other part of the year. It corresponds to UTC+02:00, which makes it the same as Eastern European Time, Central Africa Time, South African Standard Time, Egypt Standard Time and Kaliningrad Time in Russia.

Time in Russia About the 11 time zones of Russia

There are eleven time zones in Russia, which currently observe times ranging from UTC+02:00 to UTC+12:00. Daylight saving time (DST) has not been used in Russia since 26 October 2014. From 27 March 2011 to 26 October 2014, permanent DST was used.

Time in Germany Overview of the time zones used in Germany

The time zone in Germany is Central European Time and Central European Summer Time. Daylight saving time is observed from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October. The doubled hour during the switch back to standard time is named 2A and 2B.

Time in the Czech Republic

Time in the Czech Republic is given by Central European Time and Central European Summer Time. Daylight saving time is observed from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October. The Czech Republic has observed Central European Time since 1979. Until 1993 when Czechoslovakia was separated into the Czech Republic and Slovakia, they also had Central European Time and Central European Summer Time. After the summer months, time in the Czech Republic is shifted back by one hour to Central European Time. Like most states in Europe, Summer time is observed in the Czech Republic, when time is shifted forward by one hour, two hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time.

Time in Portugal Time zones in Portugal

Portugal has two time zones and observes daylight saving time. Continental Portugal and Madeira use UTC+00:00, while the Azores use UTC–01:00. Daylight saving time is observed nationwide from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October, so that every year, continental Portugal and Madeira temporarily use UTC+01:00, and the Azores temporarily use UTC+00:00.

Bosnia and Herzegovina uses a single time zone, denoted as Central European Time. It also observes summer time, shifting to Central European Summer Time.

Time in the Kingdom of the Netherlands is denoted by Central European Time (CET) during the winter as standard time in the Netherlands, which is one hour ahead of coordinated universal time (UTC+01:00), and Central European Summer Time (CEST) during the summer as daylight saving time, which is two hours ahead of coordinated universal time (UTC+02:00). The Caribbean Netherlands – which consist of the islands of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba – all observe Atlantic Standard Time (AST) year-round, which is four hours behind coordinated universal time (UTC−04:00).

In Slovakia, the standard time is Central European Time (UTC+01:00). Daylight saving time is observed from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October. This is shared with several other EU member states.

In Sweden, the standard time is Central European Time. Daylight saving time is observed from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October. Sweden adopted CET in 1900.

In Serbia, the standard time is Central European Time. Daylight saving time is observed from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October. Serbia adopted CET in 1884.

In Montenegro, the standard time is Central European Time. Daylight saving time is observed from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October. Montenegro has consistently used CET since it gained independence in 2006.

In Andorra, the standard time is Central European Time. Daylight saving time is observed from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October. Andorra adopted CET after WWII.

Time in Poland Time zones used in Poland

Time in Poland is given by Central European Time. Daylight saving time, which moves an hour ahead, is observed from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October. This is shared with several other EU member states.

In Slovenia, the standard time is Central European Time. Daylight saving time is observed from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October. This is shared with several other EU member states.

Time in Svalbard Time zones used in Svalbard

Svalbard, an archipelago in the Arctic Ocean belonging to the Kingdom of Norway, uses Central European Time (CET) during the winter as standard time, which is one hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC+01:00), and Central European Summer Time (CEST) during the summer as daylight saving time, which is two hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC+02:00). This is shared with the rest of Norway, as is Svalbard's use of daylight saving time, which the territory observes annually by advancing the clock forward on the last Sunday in March and back again on the last Sunday in October. However, as Svalbard experiences midnight sun during the summer due to being located north of the Arctic Circle, it gives daylight saving time no utility, and is only observed in order to make communicating with Norway Proper more convenient. At the 74th parallel north, the midnight sun lasts 99 days and polar night 84 days, while the respective figures at the 81st parallel north are 141 and 128 days.

In Luxembourg, the standard time is Central European Time. Daylight saving time is observed from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October.

In Liechtenstein, the standard time is Central European Time. Daylight saving time is observed from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October. Liechtenstein adopted CET in 1894.

Time in Libya Time zone used in Libya

Time in Libya is given by a single time zone, officially denoted as Eastern European Time. The zone is also known as Central Africa Time (CAT). Libya has observed EET since 5 November 2012, after it was announced in 2013 that Libya would be on permeant daylight saving time. Libya previously observed several different time zones as standard time and daylight saving time.

References

  1. Europe. WorldTimeZone.com.
  2. Messerli, Jakob (1995). Gleichmässig – pünktlich – schnell: Zeiteinteilung und Zeitgebrauch in der Schweiz im 19. Jahrhundert (in German). Zürich. p. 72. ISBN   3-905311-68-2. OCLC   717570797.
  3. Stuewer, Roger H. (2009). The Physical Tourist: A Science Guide for the Traveler. Springer London. p. 128. ISBN   9783764389338 . Retrieved 28 March 2022.
  4. "Verordnung des Bundesamtes für Landestopografie über Geoinformation" [Ordinance of the Federal Office of Topography on Geoinformation] (in German). Fedlex: The publication platform for federal law. 26 May 2008. Retrieved 28 March 2022.
  5. Black, Charles Bertram (1873). "Guide to Switzerland and the Italian Lakes". Sampson Low, Marston & Company. p. 21. Retrieved 28 March 2022.
  6. "Circulaire du conseil fédéral" (in French). Swiss Federal Council. 13 December 1893. Retrieved 28 March 2022 via Swiss Federal Archives.
  7. "Protokol Sitzung des schweizerischen Bundesrates" [Minutes of the session of the Swiss Federal Council](PDF) (in German). Swiss Federal Council. 7 November 1941. p. 24. Retrieved 28 March 2022 via Swiss Federal Archives.
  8. Eggert, Paul (2013-03-02). "tzcode2013a and tzdata2013a available". ICANN.
  9. Olson, Arthur David (2012-03-03). "New zone for DE, split from Europe/Berlin". gmane.comp.time.tz.

Notes

  1. Measured at 7°26′22″N46°57′08″E / 7.43944°N 46.95222°E . [4]