Timeline of Crayola

Last updated

The following is a partial timeline of Crayola's history. It covers the Crayola brand of marking utensils, as well as the history of Binney & Smith, the company that created the brand and is currently a subsidiary of Hallmark Cards known as Crayola LLC.

Contents

List of events

1864–1900

1900–1950

1950–1990

1990–2000

2000–2009

2010–2019

2020–present

See also

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References

  1. Company Man (January 30, 2019). Crayola - Switching Industries (YouTube video). Event occurs at 1:39-2:04. Retrieved November 29, 2019.
  2. Company Man (January 30, 2019). Crayola - Switching Industries (YouTube video). Event occurs at 2:31-2:46. Retrieved November 29, 2019.
  3. Company Man (January 30, 2019). Crayola - Switching Industries (YouTube video). Event occurs at 2:47-2:59. Retrieved November 29, 2019.
  4. Company Man (January 30, 2019). Crayola - Switching Industries (YouTube video). Event occurs at 3:16-3:40. Retrieved November 29, 2019.
  5. 1 2 "Colorful Moments in Time". Crayola. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  6. Company Man (January 30, 2019). Crayola - Switching Industries (YouTube video). Event occurs at 6:59-7:01. Retrieved November 29, 2019.
  7. Company Man (January 30, 2019). Crayola - Switching Industries (YouTube video). Event occurs at 7:02-7:07. Retrieved November 29, 2019.
  8. Company Man (January 30, 2019). Crayola - Switching Industries (YouTube video). Event occurs at 6:47-6:54. Retrieved November 29, 2019.
  9. Company Man (January 30, 2019). Crayola - Switching Industries (YouTube video). Event occurs at 6:55-6:57. Retrieved November 29, 2019.
  10. Company Man (January 30, 2019). Crayola - Switching Industries (YouTube video). Event occurs at 7:39-7:50. Retrieved November 29, 2019.
  11. "A Colorblind Crayon Maker? Crayola Retiree Says It's True". The Blade (Press release). State College, Pennsylvania. Associated Press. December 6, 1990. Retrieved September 20, 2014.
  12. Company Man (January 30, 2019). Crayola - Switching Industries (YouTube video). Event occurs at 7:08-7:18. Retrieved November 29, 2019.
  13. Novak, Melanie (February 2, 1996). "Mr. Rogers Picked to Pour 100 Billionth Crayola Crayon: Host of TV Show for Kids Will Come to Binney & Smith's Forks Neighborhood Tuesday". The Morning Call . Archived from the original on 2021-05-12. Retrieved 2023-10-06.
  14. "Pearl Crayons, 24 Count". Crayola. Retrieved 2019-09-11.
  15. "Neon Crayons, 24 Count". Crayola. Retrieved 2019-09-11.
  16. "Glitter Crayons, 24 Count". Crayola. Retrieved 2019-09-11.
  17. Yates, Jacqueline Laurean (May 21, 2020). "'Colors of the World': Crayola Launches Crayons in Skin Tone-Inspired Colors". Good Morning America . Retrieved 2020-05-22.