Tinissa cinerascens

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Tinissa cinerascens
Scientific classification
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T. cinerascens
Binomial name
Tinissa cinerascens
Meyrick, 1910

Tinissa cinerascens is a moth of the family Tineidae. It is found in New Guinea and surrounding islands and from the coasts of Queensland, Australia.

The larvae probably feed on fungi growing on trees in forests.


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