Tlascala

Last updated

Tlascala
Tlascala reductella - Tlascala Moth (14629298542).jpg
Tlascala reductella - Tlascala Moth (14443151298).jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Class:
Order:
Family:
Genus:
Tlascala

Hulst, 1890
Species:
T. reductella
Binomial name
Tlascala reductella
(Walker, 1863)
Synonyms
  • Nephopterix reductellaWalker, 1863
  • Pempelia gleditschiellaFernald, 1881

Tlascala is a monotypic snout moth genus described by George Duryea Hulst in 1890. [1] Its only species is Tlascala reductella, the Tlascala moth, described by Francis Walker in 1863. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from Florida to Illinois and Kentucky, as well as in Ontario. [2] It has also been recorded from Honduras.

Pyralidae Family of moths

The Pyralidae, commonly called pyralid moths, snout moths or grass moths, are a family of Lepidoptera in the ditrysian superfamily Pyraloidea. In many classifications, the grass moths (Crambidae) are included in the Pyralidae as a subfamily, making the combined group one of the largest families in the Lepidoptera. The latest review by Eugene G. Munroe & Solis, in Kristensen (1999) retains the Crambidae as a full family of Pyraloidea.

George Duryea Hulst American minister and entomologist

George Duryea Hulst was an American clergyman, botanist and entomologist.

Francis Walker (entomologist) British entomologist

Francis Walker was an English entomologist. He was one of the most prolific authors in entomology, and stirred controversy during his later life as his publications resulted in a huge number of junior synonyms.

The wingspan is about 20 mm (0.79 in). The forewings are banded with various colors. The first band is brownish, then a black, whitish and finally a pale brownish-gray band. There are two black discal spots in the median area and the subterminal line is black. The terminal line consists of a series of black dashes. The hindwings are brownish gray. [3] Adults have been recorded on wing from February to September, with most records from April to July.

Wingspan distance from one wingtip to the other wingtip of an airplane or an animal (insect, bird, bat)

The wingspan of a bird or an airplane is the distance from one wingtip to the other wingtip. For example, the Boeing 777-200 has a wingspan of 60.93 metres, and a wandering albatross caught in 1965 had a wingspan of 3.63 metres, the official record for a living bird. The term wingspan, more technically extent, is also used for other winged animals such as pterosaurs, bats, insects, etc., and other fixed-wing aircraft such as ornithopters. In humans, the term wingspan also refers to the arm span, which is distance between the length from one end of an individual's arms to the other when raised parallel to the ground at shoulder height at a 90º angle. Former professional basketball player Manute Bol stands at 7 ft 7 in (2.31 m) and owns one of the largest wingspans at 8 ft 6 in (2.59 m).

Related Research Articles

Shark (moth) species of insect

The shark is a moth of the family Noctuidae.

<i>Lintneria separatus</i> species of insect

Lintneria separatus, the separated sphinx, is a moth of the family Sphingidae. The species was first described by Berthold Neumoegen in 1885. It is found from Colorado south through New Mexico and Arizona to Veracruz and Hidalgo in Mexico.

<i>Aethalura punctulata</i> species of insect

Aethalura punctulata, the grey birch, is a moth of the family Geometridae. The species can be found in Europe.

Cryptobotys is a monotypic moth genus of the family Crambidae described by Eugene G. Munroe in 1956. Its only species, Cryptobotys zoilusalis, was described by Francis Walker in 1859. It is found in Cuba, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Central America and the southern United States, where it has been recorded from Florida.

Tebenna silphiella, the rosinweed moth, is a moth of the family Choreutidae. It is known from the central part of the United States, including Wisconsin, Illinois and Colorado. The habitat consists of prairies and meadows.

<i>Blastobasis glandulella</i> Moth species in genus Blastobasis

Blastobasis glandulella is a species of moth of the Blastobasidae family. It is found in the eastern United States and southern Ontario, Canada. It has also been recorded in California. In Europe, it has been recorded from Austria, Germany, the Czech Republic, Italy, Slovakia and Croatia.

<i>Hellula rogatalis</i> species of insect

Hellula rogatalis, the cabbage webworm, is a moth of the family Crambidae described by Hulst in 1886. It is found from the southern United States north in the east to Maryland, New York and Ontario. It is also found in Mexico, where it has been recorded from Distrito Federal.

Nagia linteola is a species of moth in the family Erebidae first described by Achille Guenée in 1852. This species occurs in South Africa, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Yemen, the Comoros, Mauritius, Madagascar, Indonesia (Borneo), India, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Thailand and in Australia, where it has been recorded from Western Australia, the Northern Territory, Queensland and Victoria.

Sorhagenia pexa is a moth in the family Cosmopterigidae. It was described by Ronald W. Hodges in 1969. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from Texas, Arkansas and Illinois.

Loxostege allectalis is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Augustus Radcliffe Grote in 1877. It is found in the United States, where it has been recorded from southern California to Texas. To the south, the range extends into Mexico and Central America.

Oenobotys vinotinctalis, the wine-tinted oenobotys moth, is a moth in the Crambidae family. It was described by George Hampson in 1895. It is found in the United States, where it has been recorded from North Carolina to Florida, west to Texas. It is also found in the West Indies and from Mexico to Central America.

Eudonia extincta is a moth in the Crambidae family. It was described by Harrison Gray Dyar Jr. in 1921. It is found in the Distrito Federal of Mexico.

Frechinia laetalis is a moth in the Crambidae family. It was described by William Barnes and James Halliday McDunnough in 1914. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from eastern Washington and Oregon to Utah, southern California and western Texas.

<i>Polyhymno luteostrigella</i> species of insect

Polyhymno luteostrigella, the polyhymno moth, is a moth of the family Gelechiidae. It is found in the United States, where it has been recorded from Texas to Florida, north to Connecticut and Kentucky. It is also found in Cuba and Puerto Rico.

<i>Scythris trivinctella</i> species of insect

Scythris trivinctella, the banded scythris moth, is a moth of the Scythrididae family. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from New England to Florida, the Great Plains states, Texas to Arizona and south into Mexico, Utah, eastern Oregon and north into southern British Columbia.

Penestola bufalis, the black penestola moth, is a moth in the family Crambidae. It was described by Achille Guenée in 1854. It is found in the US states of Texas and Florida, as well as on the Antilles. It is an accidentally introduced species on the Galápagos Islands. The habitat consists of coastal mangrove swamps and shorelines.

Agonopterix hyperella is a moth in the Depressariidae family. It was described by Charles Russell Ely in 1910. It is found in North America, where it has been recorded from Alabama, Indiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Ohio and Tennessee.

Cryptophasa argyrocolla is a moth in the Xyloryctidae family. It was described by Turner in 1917. It is found in Australia, where it has been recorded from Western Australia.

<i>Austramathes fortis</i> species of insect

Austramathes fortis is a species of moth in the family Noctuidae. It was first described by Arthur Gardiner Butler in 1880 from a specimen collected in Marlborough. It is endemic to New Zealand.

Afrida cosmiogramma is a species of moth in the family Nolidae. It was described by Harrison Gray Dyar Jr. in 1913 and is found in Cuba.

References

  1. "GlobIZ search". Global Information System on Pyraloidea. Retrieved 2011-09-29.
  2. Moth Photographers Group at Mississippi State University
  3. Bug Guide