Tomorrow Is the Question!

Last updated
Tomorrow Is the Question!
TomorrowIs.jpg
Studio album by
ReleasedNovember 1959
RecordedJanuary 16, February 23 and March 9–10, 1959
StudioContemporary's Studio, Los Angeles, U.S.
Genre Jazz
Length42:22
Label Contemporary
Producer Lester Koenig
Ornette Coleman chronology
Something Else!!!!
(1958)
Tomorrow Is the Question!
(1959)
The Shape of Jazz to Come
(1959)

Tomorrow Is the Question!, subtitled The New Music of Ornette Coleman!, is the second album by American jazz musician Ornette Coleman, originally released in 1959 by Contemporary Records. It was Coleman's last album for the label before he began a highly successful multi-album series for Atlantic Records in 1959.

Contents

As well as regular sideman Don Cherry on trumpet, the album features bassists Percy Heath and Red Mitchell, and drummer Shelly Manne. Unlike Coleman's debut Something Else!!!! , on which he was contractually obliged to feature a pianist, there is no piano on the album. [1]

Reception

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svg [2]
Yahoo! Music (favorable) [3]
The Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svg [4]
The Penguin Guide to Jazz Recordings Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svg [5]
Tom Hull B+ [6]

The album generally received better press than did Something Else!!!!. Allmusic's Thom Jurek notes the interplay of Coleman and Cherry on tunes he described as "knottier and tighter in their arrangement style" than those of the previous album. [7] Ekkehard Jost, in his book Free Jazz, noted that "as early as the 1958/59 recordings for Contemporary, the most pronounced features of Coleman's saxophone playing were set. His bent for improvisations that were largely unrestrained harmonically is evident, even in pieces whose outward make-up is anything but revolutionary." [8] Others have hailed the removal of the piano as a positive move: for Mike Andrews, "a marked conceptual improvement can be immediately recognized" as the lack of harmonic instrument allowed greater freedom for the soloists. [1]

Release history

Released as an LP by Contemporary Records in 1959. Reissued in 1991 on the Original Jazz Classics label.

Track listing

All pieces written by Ornette Coleman.

  1. "Tomorrow Is the Question!" – 3:09
  2. "Tears Inside" – 5:00
  3. "Mind and Time" – 3:08
  4. "Compassion" – 4:37
  5. "Giggin'" – 3:19
  6. "Rejoicing" – 4:01
  7. "Lorraine" – 5:55
  8. "Turnaround" – 7:58
  9. "Endless" – 5:18

Track 7 recorded on January 16, 1959; tracks 8 and 9 on February 23; tracks 1-6 recorded on March 9 and 10, 1959.

Personnel

Performance

Production

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References

  1. 1 2 Andrews, Mike (1996-10-23). "Historical Perspective" . Retrieved 2008-01-26.
  2. Allmusic review
  3. Yahoo! Music review
  4. Swenson, J., ed. (1985). The Rolling Stone Jazz Record Guide. USA: Random House/Rolling Stone. p. 44. ISBN   0-394-72643-X.
  5. Cook, Richard; Morton, Brian (2008). The Penguin Guide to Jazz Recordings (9th ed.). Penguin. p. 274. ISBN   978-0-141-03401-0.
  6. Hull, Tom (n.d.). "Jazz (1940–50s) (Reference)". tomhull.com. Retrieved March 4, 2020.
  7. Jurek, Thom. "Tomorrow Is the Question! > Overview". Allmusic . Retrieved 2008-01-26.
  8. Jost, Ekkehard (1974). Free Jazz. Da Capo Press.