Trukcharopa

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Trukcharopa
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Class:
(unranked):
clade Heterobranchia clade Euthyneura
clade Panpulmonata
clade Eupulmonata
clade Stylommatophora
informal group Sigmurethra
Superfamily:
Family:
Genus:
Trukcharopa

Solem, 1983

Trukcharopa is a genus of small, air-breathing land snails, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks in the family Charopidae.

Species

Species within the genus Trukcharopa include:

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Trukcharopa trukana is a species of small air-breathing land snails, terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusks in the family Charopidae. This species is endemic to Micronesia.

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References