Tsingy tufted-tailed rat

Last updated

Tsingy tufted-tailed rat
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Rodentia
Family: Nesomyidae
Genus: Eliurus
Species:
E. antsingy
Binomial name
Eliurus antsingy
Carleton, Goodman & Rakotondravony, 2001
Eliurus antsingy range map.svg
Range of Eliurus antsingy

The Tsingy tufted-tailed rat (Eliurus antsingy) is a species of rodent in the family Nesomyidae. It is endemic to western and northern Madagascar, and has been observed mainly in dry forest. [2] As a result of deforestation, the habitat of E. antsingy is at risk. [1]

Related Research Articles

Nesomyidae Family of rodents

The Nesomyidae are a family of African rodents in the large and complex superfamily Muroidea. It includes several subfamilies, all of which are native to either continental Africa or to Madagascar. Included in this family are Malagasy rats and mice, climbing mice, African rock mice, swamp mice, pouched rats, and the white-tailed rat.

Nesomyinae Subfamily of rodents

The Malagasy rodents are the sole members of the subfamily Nesomyinae. These animals are the only native rodents of Madagascar, come in many shapes and sizes, and occupy a wide variety of ecological niches. There are nesomyines that resemble gerbils, rats, mice, voles, and even rabbits. There are arboreal, terrestrial, and semi-fossorial varieties.

White-tipped tufted-tailed rat Species of rodent

The white-tipped tufted-tailed rat is a rodent endemic to Madagascar. It is known from only two specimens, one collected from Ampitambe forest in 1895 or 1896 and the second in 2000. It is listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as an endangered species due to habitat loss.

Majors tufted-tailed rat Species of rodent

Major's tufted-tailed rat is a species of rodent in the family Nesomyidae. It is found only in Madagascar. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests. It is threatened by habitat loss. The species was named in honor of Swiss zoologist C. I. Forsyth Major.

<i>Eliurus</i> Genus of rodents

Eliurus is a genus of rodent in the family Nesomyidae. It contains the following species:

Lesser tufted-tailed rat Species of rodent

The lesser tufted-tailed rat is a species of rodent in the family Nesomyidae. It is found only in Madagascar.

Dormouse tufted-tailed rat Species of rodent

The Dormouse tufted-tailed rat is a species of rodent in the family Nesomyidae. It is found only in Madagascar.

Tanala tufted-tailed rat Species of rodent

The Tanala tufted-tailed rat is a species of rodent in the family Nesomyidae. It is found only in Madagascar.

Webbs tufted-tailed rat Species of rodent

Webb's tufted-tailed rat is a species of rodent in the family Nesomyidae. It is found only in Madagascar. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry forests. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Antsingy leaf chameleon Species of lizard

The Antsingy leaf chameleon is a species of lizards in the family Chamaeleonidae. It is also referred to as Armoured leaf chameleon.

<i>Voalavo</i> Genus of rodents from Madagascar

Voalavo is a genus of rodent in the subfamily Nesomyinae, found only in Madagascar. Two species are known, both of which occur in mountain forest above 1250 m (4100 ft) altitude; the northern voalavo lives in northern Madagascar and eastern voalavo is restricted to a small area in the central part of the island. The genus was discovered in 1994 and formally described in 1998. Within Nesomyinae, it is most closely related to the genus Eliurus, and DNA sequence data suggest that the current definitions of these two genera need to be changed.

Northern voalavo Rodent in the family Nesomyidae

The northern voalavo, also known as the naked-tailed voalavo or simply the voalavo, is a rodent in the family Nesomyidae found in the highlands of northern Madagascar. Discovered in 1994 and formally described in 1998, it is the type species of the genus Voalavo; its closest relative is the eastern voalavo of the Central Highlands. DNA sequencing suggests that it may be more closely related to Grandidier's tufted-tailed rat than to other species of the closely related genus Eliurus. The northern voalavo is found at 1,250 to 1,950 m above sea level in montane wet and dry forests in the Marojejy and Anjanaharibe-Sud massifs. Nocturnal and solitary, it lives mainly on the ground, but it can climb and probably eats plant matter. Despite having a small range, the species is classified as being of least concern because it lacks obvious threats and much of its range is within protected areas.

The Ankarana Special Reserve tufted-tailed rat is a species of rodent in the family Nesomyidae. It was first described in 2009. It is endemic to Madagascar, in the Ankarana Special Reserve.

Malagasy mountain mouse Small rodent found in the highlands of eastern Madagascar

The Malagasy mountain mouse or Koopman's montane voalavo(Monticolomys koopmani) is a rodent within the subfamily Nesomyinae of the family Nesomyidae. It is monotypic within the genus Monticolomys, and is closely related to the big-footed mouse (Macrotarsomys). It is found in the highlands of eastern Madagascar. A small mouse-like rodent, it is dark brown on the upperparts and dark gray below. It has small, rounded, densely haired ears and broad feet with well-developed pads. The long tail lacks a tuft at the tip. The skull is delicate and lacks crests and ridges on its roof.

Daniels tufted-tailed rat Species of rodent

Daniel's tufted-tailed rat is a species of rodent in the family Nesomyidae. It was discovered in 2003 in the Parc National de l’Isalo in south-central Madagascar. It is named for Daniel Rakotondravony, professor of animal biology at the University of Antananarivo, Madagascar.

Andreacarus voalavo is a parasitic mite found on the Malagasy rodent Voalavo gymnocaudus. First described in 2007, it is closely related to Andreacarus gymnuromys and Andreacarus eliurus, which are found on other Malagasy rodents. The length of the idiosoma, the main body, is 630 to 670 μm in females and 450 to 480 μm in males. Unlike A. eliurus, this species lacks distinct sternal glands between two lyrifissures on the lower part of the female body. The pilus dentilis, a sensory organ on the chelicera, is serrate, which distinguishes it from A. gymnuromys. Females of A. gymnuromys also have a less ornamented sternal shield and shorter setae (bristles) on the upperparts.

Petter's tufted-tailed rat is a rodent in the genus Eliurus found in lowland eastern Madagascar. First described in 1994, it is most closely related to the smaller Eliurus grandidieri. Virtually nothing is known of its natural history, except that it occurs in rainforest and is nocturnal and solitary. It is threatened by destruction and fragmentation of its habitat and is listed as "Vulnerable" on the IUCN Red List.

Grandidiers tufted-tailed rat Species of rodent

Grandidier's tufted-tailed rat is a species of rodent from the family Nesomyidae. Morphological evidence suggests that Grandidier's tufted-tailed rat is most closely related to Petter's tufted-tailed rat, E. petteri. However, Grandidier's tufted-tailed rat is the smaller of the two species.

References

  1. 1 2 Kennerley, R. (2016). "Eliurus antsingy". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . 2016: e.T48267436A22238593. doi: 10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-3.RLTS.T48267436A22238593.en . Retrieved 11 November 2021.
  2. Wilson, Don E. & Reeder, DeeAnn M. (2005). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference, Volume 2. JHU Press. ISBN   9780801882210.