University of North Carolina at Asheville

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University of North Carolina Asheville
University of North Carolina at Asheville seal.png
MottoLevo Oculos Meos In Montes
Motto in English
I Lift My Eyes to the Mountains
Type Public
Established1927;94 years ago (1927)
Parent institution
UNC System
Endowment $52.4 million (2020) [1]
Chancellor Nancy J. Cable
Academic staff
320 (part- & full-time)(Fall 2018) [2]
Students3,765 (Fall 2018) [3]
Undergraduates 3,746 (Fall 2018) [3]
Postgraduates 19 (Fall 2018) [3]
Location, ,
United States
CampusUrban
Colors Blue and White [4]
   
Athletics NCAA Division IBig South
Nickname Bulldogs
Affiliations COPLAC
Website www.unca.edu
University of North Carolina at Asheville logo.png

The University of North Carolina Asheville (UNC Asheville,UNCA, or simply Asheville) is a public liberal arts university in Asheville, North Carolina. [5] UNC Asheville is the only designated [6] liberal arts institution in the University of North Carolina system. UNC Asheville is a member of the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges.

Contents

History

Asheville, North Carolina Asheville Centro.jpg
Asheville, North Carolina

UNC Asheville was founded in 1927 [7] as Buncombe County Junior College, part of the Buncombe County public school system. In 1930 the school merged with the College of the City of Asheville (founded in 1928) to form Biltmore Junior College. In 1934 the college was renamed Biltmore College and placed in the control of a board of trustees. 1936 brought both a further change of name to Asheville-Biltmore College, and control was transferred to the Asheville City Schools.[ citation needed ]

The 20,000-square foot Overlook, or "Seely's Castle", home of Fred Loring Seely, who designed Grove Park Inn, described as "one of Asheville's most pretentious private residences", became part of Asheville-Biltmore College in 1949. The house, no longer part of the college, was named to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. [8] [9]

In 1961 Asheville-Biltmore College moved to the present UNC Asheville campus [10] in north Asheville. In 1963 it became a state-supported four-year college, and awarded its first bachelor's degrees in 1966. Its first residence halls were built in 1967. It adopted its current name in 1969 upon becoming part of the Consolidated University of North Carolina, since 1972 called the University of North Carolina System. It is one of three baccalaureate colleges within that system, and has been classified as a Liberal Arts I institution since 1992.

Chief Executive Officers

Chief Executive Officers of the university: [11]

Academics

Ramsey library, UNCA campus Bieb.jpg
Ramsey library, UNCA campus
University rankings
National
Forbes [12] 494
THE/WSJ [13] 501-600
Liberal arts colleges
U.S. News & World Report [14] 140
Washington Monthly [15] 135

UNC Asheville offers four-year undergraduate programs leading to Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in 36 majors, [16] and is classified by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education as a Baccalaureate College—Arts & Sciences (Bac/A&S). [17]

Administration

The university is led by Chancellor Nancy J. Cable, along with Acting Provost Karin Peterson and several advisory groups. The institution operates under the guidance and policies of the Board of Trustees of the University of North Carolina at Asheville. [18]

As part of the University of North Carolina's 17-campus university system, UNC Asheville also falls under the administration of President Margaret Spellings [19] and the UNC Board of Governors advised by the UNC Faculty Assembly. [20] [21]

Student Government Association

UNC Asheville's Student Government Association (SGA) consists of two branches, an 18-seat Student Senate and an executive branch comprising a President, Vice-President, and Cabinet. Representation in the Student Senate is divided among the four classes, with three additional seats each being given to residential and commuter students. SGA's authority is derived from the Chancellor and the Board of Governors.

Athletics

UNC Asheville's athletics teams are known as the Bulldogs. They are a member of the NCAA's Division I and compete in the Big South Conference. [22]

Points of interest

Lightning over the Wilma M. Sherrill Center. Lightning Over Asheville, North Carolina 01.JPG
Lightning over the Wilma M. Sherrill Center.

Faculty

UNC Asheville had 221 full-time faculty members as of Fall 2018, with 87.3% holding terminal degrees in their field. [24] Another 99 faculty serve part-time. [2]

Notable Faculty

Notable alumni

Related Research Articles

University of North Carolina Public university system for North Carolina

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Buncombe County, North Carolina U.S. county in North Carolina

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Carolina Day School is an independent, co-ed, college preparatory school serving grades pre-K through 12. The school is in the historic Biltmore Forest neighborhood of Asheville, North Carolina. It consists of a lower, middle, and upper school. While classes in the lower and upper schools have mixed genders, the middle school serves as a member of the Gurian Institute, which practices gender-specific learning.

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References

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Coordinates: 35°36′58″N82°33′58″W / 35.61619°N 82.56614°W / 35.61619; -82.56614