1914 County Championship

Last updated
1914 County Championship
Cricket format First-class cricket (3 days)
Tournament format(s) League system
Champions Surrey (7th title)
Participants16
Most runs Jack Hobbs
(2,499 for Surrey) [1]
Most wickets Colin Blythe
(159 for Kent) [2]
1913
1919

The 1914 County Championship was the 25th officially organised running of the County Championship, and began on 2 May 1914. Originally scheduled to run until 9 September, the last two matches of the season (both involving Surrey) were cancelled due to the outbreak of World War I. [3] [4]

County Championship Domestic first-class cricket competition in England and Wales

The County Championship, currently known as the Specsavers County Championship for sponsorship reasons, is the domestic first-class cricket competition in England and Wales and is organised by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB). It became an official title in 1890. The competition consists of eighteen clubs named after, and originally representing, historic counties, seventeen from England and one from Wales. From 2016, the Championship has been sponsored by Specsavers, who replaced Liverpool Victoria after 14 years.

Surrey County Cricket Club English cricket club

Surrey County Cricket Club is one of eighteen first-class county clubs within the domestic cricket structure of England and Wales. It represents the historic county of Surrey and also South London. The club was founded in 1845 but teams representing the county have played top-class cricket since the early 18th century and the club has always held first-class status. Surrey have competed in the County Championship since the official start of the competition in 1890 and have played in every top-level domestic cricket competition in England.

World War I 1914–1918 global war starting in Europe

World War I, also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918. Contemporaneously described as "the war to end all wars", it led to the mobilisation of more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, making it one of the largest wars in history. It is also one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war, while resulting genocides and the resulting 1918 influenza pandemic caused another 50 to 100 million deaths worldwide.

Contents

With the final positions in the table being calculated by the percentage of possible points gained, Surrey were named champions for the seventh time. [5]

Table

Five points were awarded for each win, three points were awarded to the team winning on first innings in a drawn match, and one point was awarded to the team losing on first innings in a drawn match. Defeats and abandonments scored no points.

TeamPld W T L D A PtsPts%
Surrey 281502829374.4
Middlesex 201102707070.0
Kent 281607508762.1
Yorkshire 2814041008661.4
Hampshire 2813041108258.6
Sussex 2810061016852.3
Warwickshire 24907806150.8
Essex 24909605949.2
Northamptonshire 22706815148.6
Nottinghamshire 20505904648.4
Lancashire 266091105139.2
Derbyshire 205012303434.0
Leicestershire 244011813833.0
Worcestershire 222013602221.0
Somerset 203016011515.8
Gloucestershire 221017401513.6
Source: [5]

Leading averages

Most runs
Aggregate Average PlayerCounty
2,49962.47 Jack Hobbs Surrey
2,23555.87 Phil Mead Hampshire
1,93346.02 Frank Woolley Kent
1,82876.16 J. W. Hearne Middlesex
1,73538.55 Wally Hardinge Kent
Source: [1]
Most wickets
Aggregate Average PlayerCounty
15915.03 Colin Blythe Kent
14820.09 Alec Kennedy Hampshire
14118.28 Major Booth Yorkshire
13516.36 Alonzo Drake Yorkshire
12619.76 Bill Hitch Surrey
Source: [2]

See also

1914 English cricket season

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References

  1. 1 2 "Batting in 1914 County Championship (Ordered by Runs)" . CricketArchive. Retrieved 18 April 2009.
  2. 1 2 "Bowling in 1914 County Championship (Ordered by Wickets)" . CricketArchive. Retrieved 18 April 2009.
  3. "Sussex v Surrey in 1914" . CricketArchive. Archived from the original on 4 May 2009. Retrieved 18 April 2009.
  4. "Surrey v Leicestershire in 1914" . CricketArchive. Retrieved 18 April 2009.
  5. 1 2 "County Championship 1914 Table" . CricketArchive. Retrieved 18 April 2009.