2003 FIFA Women's World Cup Group A

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Group A of the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup was one of four groups of nations, consisting of Nigeria, North Korea, Sweden and the United States. It began on 20 September and ended on 28 September. Defending champions and host United States topped the group with a 100% record, joined in the second round by Sweden, who overcame their defeat in the first game to qualify for the knockout stage.

2003 FIFA Womens World Cup 2003 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, the fourth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in the United States and won by Germany. They won their first women's world title and became the first country to win both men's and women's World Cup. The men's team had won the World Cup three times at the time.

Nigeria womens national football team womens national association football team representing Nigeria

The Nigeria national women's football team, nicknamed the Super Falcons, is the national team of Nigeria and is controlled by the Nigeria Football Federation. They won the first seven African championships and through their first twenty years lost only five games to African competition: December 12, 2002 to Ghana in Warri, June 3, 2007 at Algeria, August 12, 2007 to Ghana in an Olympic qualifier, November 25, 2008 at Equatorial Guinea in the semis of the 2008 Women's African Football Championship and May 2011 at Ghana in an All Africa Games qualification match.

North Korea womens national football team womens national football team representing North Korea

The North Korea women's national football team represents North Korea in international women's football. North Korea won the AFC Women's Asian Cup in 2001, 2003, and 2008.

Contents

Standings

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 3300111+109
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 320153+26
Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 31023413
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 3003011110

All times local (EDT/UTC–4)

Nigeria vs North Korea

Nigeria  Flag of Nigeria.svg 0–3 Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea
Report Jin Pyol Hui Soccerball shade.svg 13', 88'
Ri Un Gyong Soccerball shade.svg 73'
GK 12 Precious Dede
DF 3Bunmi Kayode
DF 6 Kikelomo Ajayi Yellowcard.svg 28'
DF 17Florence Omagbemi (c) Sub off.svg 44'
DF 14Ifeanyichukwu Chiejine Sub off.svg 85'
DF 16Florence Iweta
MF 2 Efioanwan Ekpo
MF 4 Perpetua Nkwocha
MF 7 Stella Mbachu
FW 10 Mercy Akide Yellowcard.svg 22'
FW 11Nkechi Egbe Sub off.svg 46'
Substitutions:
MF 15 Maureen Mmadu Sub on.svg 44'
MF 18Patience Avre Sub on.svg 46'
DF 5 Onome Ebi Sub on.svg 85'
Manager:
Samuel Okpodu
GK 1Jon Myong Hui (c)
DF 2Yun In Sil
DF 5Sin Kum Ok
DF 12Jang Ok Gyong
DF 17Jon Hye Yong Yellowcard.svg 71'
MF 11Yun Yong Hui Sub off.svg 57'
MF 14O Kum Ran
MF 15Ri Un Gyong
MF 19Ri Hyang Ok Yellowcard.svg 25'
FW 7 Ri Kum Suk Sub off.svg 81'
FW 10Jin Pyol Hui
Substitutions:
FW 16Pak Kyong Sun Sub on.svg 57'
MF 9Ho Sun Hui Sub on.svg 81'
Manager:
Song Gun Ri

Player of the Match:
Flag of North Korea.svg Jin Pyol Hui (North Korea) [1]

Assistant referees:
Flag of Switzerland.svg Elke Lüthi (Switzerland)
Flag of France.svg Nelly Viennot (France)
Fourth official:
Flag of Australia.svg Tammy Ogston (Australia)

Assistant referee (association football) official in association football

In association football, an assistant referee is an official empowered with assisting the referee in enforcing the Laws of the Game during a match. Although assistants are not required under the Laws, at most organised levels of football the match officiating crew consists of the referee and at least two assistant referees. The responsibilities of the various assistant referees are listed in Law 6, "The Other Match Officials". In the current Laws the term "assistant referee" technically refers only to the two officials who generally patrol the touchlines, with the wider range of assistants to the referee given other titles.

Swiss Football Association governing body of association football in Switzerland

The Swiss Football Association is the governing body of football in Switzerland. It organizes the football league, the Swiss Football League and the Switzerland national football team. It is based in Bern.

Nelly Viennot is a French football referee. An international woman's referee since 1995, she served as an assistant referee in the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup.

United States vs Sweden

United States  Flag of the United States.svg 3–1 Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Lilly Soccerball shade.svg 27'
Parlow Soccerball shade.svg 36'
Boxx Soccerball shade.svg 78'
Report Svensson Soccerball shade.svg 58'
RFK Stadium, Washington
Attendance: 35,000
Referee: Zhang Dongqing (China PR)
GK 1 Briana Scurry Yellowcard.svg 13'
DF 3 Christie Rampone
DF 14 Joy Fawcett
DF 6 Brandi Chastain Sub off.svg 46'
DF 15 Kate Markgraf
MF 13 Kristine Lilly
MF 7 Shannon Boxx
MF 11 Julie Foudy (c)
FW 12 Cindy Parlow Sub off.svg 70'
FW 9 Mia Hamm
FW 20 Abby Wambach Sub off.svg 56'
Substitutions:
DF 4 Cat Whitehill Sub on.svg 46'
FW 16 Tiffeny Milbrett Sub on.svg 56'
MF 10 Aly Wagner Yellowcard.svg 72' Sub on.svg 70'
Manager:
April Heinrichs
GK 1 Caroline Jönsson
DF 4 Hanna Marklund
DF 2 Karolina Westberg
DF 3 Jane Törnqvist
DF 7 Sara Larsson
MF 9 Malin Andersson (c) Sub off.svg 77'
MF 15 Therese Sjögran Sub off.svg 46'
MF 6 Malin Moström
MF 14 Linda Fagerström
FW 10 Hanna Ljungberg Sub off.svg 83'
FW 11 Victoria Svensson
Substitutes:
DF 18 Frida Östberg Sub on.svg 46'
MF 17 Anna Sjöström Yellowcard.svg 90+3' Sub on.svg 77'
FW 20 Josefine Öqvist Sub on.svg 83'
Manager:
Marika Domanski-Lyfors

Player of the Match:
Flag of the United States.svg Kristine Lilly (United States) [2]

Kristine Lilly soccer player

Kristine Marie Lilly Heavey, née Kristine Marie Lilly, is a retired American soccer player who last played professionally for Boston Breakers in Women's Professional Football (WPS). She was a member of the United States women's national football team for 23 years and is the most capped football player in the history of the sport gaining her 354th and final cap against Mexico in a World Cup qualifier in November 2010. Lilly scored 130 goals for the United States women's national team, behind Mia Hamm's 158 goals, and Abby Wambach's 184.

Assistant referees:
Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Liu Hsiu-mei (Chinese Taipei)
Flag of Japan.svg Hisae Yoshizawa (Japan)
Fourth official:
Flag of Togo.svg Xonam Agboyi (Togo) [3]

Liu Hsiu-mei is a Taiwanese football referee and former player. She was the winner of AFC Assistant Referee of the Year in 2007.

Chinese Taipei Football Association

Chinese Taipei Football Association (CTFA) is the governing body for football in the Republic of China. Its official name in Chinese is the Football Association of the Republic of China, but it is billed as the "Chinese Taipei Football Association" abroad and uses the English initials on its badge.

Japan Football Association sports governing body

The Japan Football Association or Japan FA is the governing body responsible for the administration of football in Japan. It is responsible for the national team as well as club competitions.

Sweden vs North Korea

Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg 1–0 Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea
Svensson Soccerball shade.svg 7' Report
GK 1 Caroline Jönsson
DF 4 Hanna Marklund
DF 2 Karolina Westberg  Yellowcard.svg 52'
DF 3 Jane Törnqvist
DF 7 Sara Larsson
DF 18 Frida Östberg
MF 9 Malin Andersson Sub off.svg 65'
MF 6 Malin Moström (c)
MF 14 Linda Fagerström Sub off.svg 56'
FW 10 Hanna Ljungberg Sub off.svg 86'
FW 11 Victoria Svensson
Substitutes:
MF 17 Anna Sjöström Sub on.svg 56'
DF 5 Kristin Bengtsson Sub on.svg 65'
FW 20 Josefine Öqvist Sub on.svg 86'
Manager:
Marika Domanski-Lyfors
GK 1Jon Myong Hui (c)
DF 6Ra Mi Ae Sub off.svg 62'
DF 5Sin Kum Ok Sub off.svg 55'
DF 12Jang Ok Gyong Yellowcard.svg 56'
DF 17Jon Hye Yong
MF 11Yun Yong Hui Sub off.svg 36'
MF 14O Kum Ran
MF 15Ri Un Gyong
MF 19Ri Hyang Ok
FW 7 Ri Kum Suk
FW 10Jin Pyol Hui
Substitutions:
MF 9Ho Sun Hui Sub on.svg 36'
DF 2Yun In Sil Sub on.svg 55'
DF 13 Song Jong Sun Sub on.svg 62'
Manager:
Song Gun Ri

Player of the Match:
Flag of Sweden.svg Victoria Svensson (Sweden) [4]

Victoria Sandell Svensson Swedish association football player

Victoria Margareta Sandell Svensson is a former Swedish female football player. She was team captain on the Swedish women's national team and Djurgårdens IF Dam, captaining the national team during the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup. She was known as Victoria Svensson until she married Camilla Sandell in April 2008 and added her surname to her own.

Assistant referees:
Flag of Australia.svg Airlie Keen (Australia)
Flag of Australia.svg Jacqueline Leleu (Australia)
Fourth official:
Flag of South Korea.svg Im Eun-Ju (South Korea)

United States vs Nigeria

United States  Flag of the United States.svg 5–0 Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria
Hamm Soccerball shade.svg 6' (pen.), 12'
Parlow Soccerball shade.svg 47'
Wambach Soccerball shade.svg 65'
Foudy Soccerball shade.svg 89' (pen.)
Report
Lincoln Financial Field, Philadelphia
Attendance: 31,553
Referee: Florencia Romano (Argentina)
GK 1 Briana Scurry
DF 2 Kylie Bivens
DF 14 Joy Fawcett
DF 4 Cat Whitehill
DF 15 Kate Markgraf
MF 13 Kristine Lilly
MF 7 Shannon Boxx Sub off.svg 71'
MF 11 Julie Foudy (c)
MF 10 Aly Wagner Sub off.svg 46'
FW 12 Cindy Parlow Sub off.svg 57'
FW 9 Mia Hamm
Substitutions:
FW 20 Abby Wambach  Sub on.svg 46'
FW 16 Tiffeny Milbrett Sub on.svg 57'
MF 5 Tiffany Roberts Sub on.svg 71'
Manager:
April Heinrichs
GK 12 Precious Dede
DF 3Bunmi Kayode
DF 6 Kikelomo Ajayi
DF 17Florence Omagbemi (c)  Yellowcard.svg 76'
DF 14Ifeanyichukwu Chiejine
MF 18Patience Avre
MF 15 Maureen Mmadu
MF 13Nkiru Okosieme
MF 7 Stella Mbachu
MF 4 Perpetua Nkwocha
FW 10 Mercy Akide
Manager:
Samuel Okpodu

Player of the Match:
Flag of the United States.svg Mia Hamm (United States) [5]

Assistant referees:
Flag of Argentina.svg Sabrina Lois (Argentina)
Flag of Argentina.svg Alejandra Cercato (Argentina)
Fourth official:
Flag of South Korea.svg Im Eun-Ju (South Korea)

Sweden vs Nigeria

Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg 3–0 Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria
Ljungberg Soccerball shade.svg 56', 79'
Moström Soccerball shade.svg 81'
Report
Columbus Crew Stadium, Columbus
Attendance: 22,828
Referee: Sonia Denoncourt (Canada)
GK 1 Caroline Jönsson
DF 4 Hanna Marklund
DF 2 Karolina Westberg
DF 5 Kristin Bengtsson Sub off.svg 46'
DF 19Sara Call
DF 7 Sara Larsson
DF 18 Frida Östberg
MF 9 Malin Andersson (c) Sub off.svg 66'
MF 6 Malin Moström
FW 10 Hanna Ljungberg
FW 11 Victoria Svensson Sub off.svg 85'
Substitutes:
MF 17 Anna Sjöström Sub on.svg 46'
MF 15 Therese Sjögran Sub on.svg 66'
FW 20 Josefine Öqvist Sub on.svg 85'
Manager:
Marika Domanski-Lyfors
GK 12 Precious Dede
DF 6 Kikelomo Ajayi
DF 16Florence Iweta Sub off.svg 83'
DF 17Florence Omagbemi (c)
DF 14Ifeanyichukwu Chiejine
MF 18Patience Avre Sub off.svg 89'
MF 15 Maureen Mmadu
MF 13Nkiru Okosieme Sub off.svg 65'
MF 7 Stella Mbachu
MF 4 Perpetua Nkwocha
FW 10 Mercy Akide
Substitutions:
MF 2 Efioanwan Ekpo Sub on.svg 63'
DF 5 Onome Ebi Sub on.svg 83'
FW 8Yusuf Olaitan Sub on.svg 89'
Manager:
Samuel Okpodu

Player of the Match:
Flag of Sweden.svg Hanna Ljungberg (Sweden) [6]

Assistant referees:
Flag of Canada.svg Denise Robinson (Canada)
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg Lynda Bramble (Trinidad and Tobago)
Fourth official:
Flag of Finland.svg Katriina Elovirta (Finland)

North Korea vs United States

North Korea  Flag of North Korea.svg 0–3 Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Report Wambach Soccerball shade.svg 17' (pen.)
Reddick Soccerball shade.svg 48', 66'
Columbus Crew Stadium, Columbus
Attendance: 22,828
Referee: Sueli Tortura (Brazil)
GK 1Jon Myong Hui (c)
DF 2Yun In Sil
DF 6Ra Mi Ae
DF 5Sin Kum Ok Sub off.svg 26'
DF 12Jang Ok Gyong
DF 2Yun In Sil
MF 11Yun Yong Hui Sub off.svg 74'
MF 14O Kum Ran Yellowcard.svg 16' Sub off.svg 53'
MF 15Ri Un Gyong
MF 19Ri Hyang Ok
FW 7 Ri Kum Suk
FW 10Jin Pyol Hui
Substitutions:
DF 17Jon Hye Yong Sub on.svg 26'
DF 13 Song Jong Sun Sub on.svg 53'
FW 16Pak Kyong Sun Yellowcard.svg 90+1' Sub on.svg 74'
Manager:
Song Gun Ri
GK 1 Briana Scurry
DF 2 Kylie Bivens
DF 3 Christie Rampone
DF 14 Joy Fawcett (c)
DF 15 Kate Markgraf Sub off.svg 73'
DF 4 Cat Whitehill
MF 13 Kristine Lilly Sub off.svg 46'
MF 5 Tiffany Roberts
MF 10 Aly Wagner
FW 16 Tiffeny Milbrett Yellowcard.svg 40'
FW 20 Abby Wambach Yellowcard.svg 22' Sub off.svg 56'
Substitutions:
MF 11 Julie Foudy Sub on.svg 46'
FW 8 Shannon MacMillan Sub on.svg 56'
DF 17 Danielle Slaton Sub on.svg 73'
Manager:
April Heinrichs

Player of the Match:
Flag of the United States.svg Cat Whitehill (United States) [7]

Assistant referees:
Flag of Brazil.svg Cleidy Mary Ribeiro (Brazil)
Flag of Brazil.svg Marlei Silva (Brazil)
Fourth official:
Flag of Finland.svg Katriina Elovirta (Finland)

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References

  1. "Bud Light Player of the Match: Jin Pyol Hui (PRK)". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 20 September 2003. Archived from the original on 18 February 2004. Retrieved 29 October 2014.
  2. "Bud Light Player of the Match: Kristine Lilly (USA)". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 21 September 2003. Archived from the original on 11 January 2006. Retrieved 29 October 2014.
  3. "Match Report". FIFAworldcup.com. Archived from the original on December 13, 2004.
  4. "Bud Light Player of the Match: Victoria Svensson (SWE)". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 25 September 2003. Archived from the original on 31 August 2005. Retrieved 29 October 2014.
  5. "Bud Light Player of the Match: Mia Hamm (USA)". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 26 September 2003. Archived from the original on 15 October 2004. Retrieved 29 October 2014.
  6. "Bud Light Player of the Match: Hanna Ljungberg (SWE)". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 28 September 2003. Archived from the original on 7 December 2005. Retrieved 29 October 2014.
  7. "Bud Light Player of the Match: Cat Reddick (USA)". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 28 September 2003. Archived from the original on 5 December 2005. Retrieved 29 October 2014.