Chinese Taipei Football Association

Last updated
Chinese Taipei Football Association
AFC
Chinese Taipei Football Association.png
Founded1924;96 years ago (1924)
FIFA affiliation1954
AFC affiliation1954
EAFF affiliation2002
President Chiou I-jen
Website www.ctfa.com.tw
Chinese Taipei Football Association
Traditional Chinese 中華民國足球協會
Simplified Chinese 中华民国足球协会

Chinese Taipei Football Association (CTFA) is the governing body for football in the Republic of China (commonly known as Taiwan). Its official name in Chinese is the Republic of China Football Association, but it is billed as the "Chinese Taipei Football Association" abroad and uses the English initials on its badge (see Chinese Taipei for details on the political reasons and issues related to the use of this sporting name for the Republic of China). [1]

Contents

History


NamePositionSource
Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chiou I-jen President [2] [3]
Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Lu Gui-Hua Vice President [4] [5]
Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Hsiao Yong-Fu 2nd Vice President [6] [7]
Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Hsieh Jun-Huan 3rd Vice President [8] [9]
Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Fang Ching-Jen General Secretary [10] [11]
Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Lin Xiu-Yi Treasurer [12]
Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Yen Shih-Kai Technical Director [13] [14]
Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Wang Jia-Zhong Team Coach (Men's) [15] [16]
Flag of Japan.svg Kazuo Echigo Team Coach (Women's) [17]
Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chiao Chia-Hung Media/Communications Manager [18]
Jose Amarante Futsal Coordinator [19]
Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg Chuang Er-Yi Referee Coordinator [20]


Competitions

Regional football associations

See also

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References

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