Chinese Football Association

Last updated
Chinese Football Association
AFC
Chinese Football Association logo 2018.jpg
Founded
  • 1924 (original)
  • 1955 (as CFA) [1]
FIFA affiliation1931
AFC affiliation1974
EAFF affiliation2002
President Chen Xuyuan
Website www.thecfa.cn
Chinese Football Association
Simplified Chinese 中国足球协会
Traditional Chinese 中國足球協會

The Chinese Football Association (CFA) is the governing body of football in the People's Republic of China. [2] [3] Original formed in Beijing during 1924, the association would affiliate itself with FIFA in 1931 before relocating to Taiwan following the end of Chinese Civil War (see Chinese Taipei Football Association). During 1955 in Beijing, the CFA refused to affiliate itself with any other major association until it joined the Asian Football Confederation in 1974, [4] followed up with FIFA once more in 1979. Since rejoining FIFA, the CFA claims to be a non-governmental and a nonprofit organization, but in fact the CFA is the same bureau with Management Center of Football, which is a department of the Chinese State General Administration of Sports. [5]

China Country in East Asia

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a country in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion in 2017. Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third or fourth largest country by total area. Governed by the Communist Party of China, the state exercises jurisdiction over 22 provinces, five autonomous regions, four direct-controlled municipalities, and the special administrative regions of Hong Kong and Macau.

Beijing Municipality in Peoples Republic of China

Beijing, formerly romanized as Peking, is the capital of the People's Republic of China, the world's third most populous city proper, and most populous capital city. The city, located in northern China, is governed as a municipality under the direct administration of the central government with 16 urban, suburban, and rural districts. Beijing Municipality is surrounded by Hebei Province with the exception of neighboring Tianjin Municipality to the southeast; together, the three divisions form the Jingjinji metropolitan region and the national capital region of China.

FIFA International governing body of association football

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Contents

Overview

The original China Football Association was founded in 1924. In 1931, it affiliated itself with FIFA, but was relocated to Taiwan following the end of Chinese Civil War, which later became the Chinese Taipei football organization. The current Chinese Football Association was founded in China after 1949. [5] In 1994, the CFA formed a professional league consisting of the Chinese Jia-A League and the Chinese Jia-B League, each having twelve clubs with two clubs being promoted and relegated from their respective leagues every year. [6] Beginning with the 2004 season, the former Chinese Jia-A League was replaced by the Chinese Super League, with the Chinese Jia-B League renamed as the new China League One.

Chinese Civil War Series of conflicts within China, 1927 – circa 1950

The Chinese Civil War was a civil war in China fought between the Kuomintang (KMT)-led government of the Republic of China (ROC) and the Communist Party of China (CPC) lasting intermittently between 1927 and 1949. Although particular attention is paid to the four years of fighting from 1945 to 1949, the war actually started in August 1927, after the KMT-CPC Alliance collapsed during the Northern Expedition. The conflict took place in two stages, the first between 1927 and 1937, and the second from 1946 to 1950; the Second Sino-Japanese War from 1937 to 1945 was an interlude in which the two sides were united against the forces of Japan. The Civil War resulted in a major revolution in China, with the Communists gaining control of mainland China and establishing the People's Republic of China (PRC) in 1949, forcing the Republic of China to retreat to Taiwan. A lasting political and military standoff between the two sides of the Taiwan Strait ensued, with the ROC in Taiwan and the PRC in mainland China both officially claiming to be the legitimate government of all China.

Chinese Taipei national football team mens national association football team representing Taiwan

The Chinese Taipei national football team represents Taiwan in international football and is controlled by the Chinese Taipei Football Association, the governing body for football in Taiwan.

The National Football Jia A League (simplified Chinese, commonly known as Jia-A, was the highest tier of professional football in the People's Republic of China, during 1994 through 2003, operating under the auspices of the Chinese Football Association.

China also has national football teams for both men and women. Historically, the women have been more competitive internationally than the men, losing in a penalty shootout to the United States in the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup final, and also finishing fourth in the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup.

United States womens national soccer team Womens national association football team representing the United States

The United States women's national soccer team (USWNT) represents the United States in international women's soccer. The team is the most successful in international women's soccer, winning four Women's World Cup titles, four Olympic gold medals, and eight CONCACAF Gold Cups. It medaled in every World Cup and Olympic tournament in women's soccer history from 1991 to 2015, before being knocked out in the quarterfinal of the 2016 Summer Olympics. The team is governed by United States Soccer Federation and competes in CONCACAF. The United States women's national soccer team recently just won the 2019 World Cup for the 4th time by defeating Netherlands 2-0.

In 2008 China topped the 2008 Summer Olympics medal table for the first time in their history, however despite football being the most predominant team sport played within the country the men's U-23 team underperformed within the competition. [7] On October 21, 2009 The Chinese President at the time Hu Jintao publicly expressed concern for the development of Chinese football. [8] On November 18, 2009 a Task force was set up, and they quickly concluded that match-fixing and illegal gambling syndicates had infiltrated every aspect of the Chinese game and were the biggest concern for the development of Chinese football. [9] On January 21, 2010 the Ministry of Public Security of the People's Republic of China would confirm the arrests of Vice chairman Nan Yong and former Head of refereeing and the current women's football chief Zhang Jianqiang for accepting bribes as well as their knowledge match-fixing during their tenures. [10] This was eventually followed with the arrest of former Vice chairman Xie Yalong on October 6, 2010 for the same crimes. [11]

2008 Summer Olympics medal table

The 2008 Summer Olympics medal table is a list of National Olympic Committees (NOCs) ranked by the number of gold medals won by their athletes during the 2008 Summer Olympics, held in Beijing, the capital of the People's Republic of China, from 8 August to 24 August 2008. Approximately 11,028 athletes from 204 NOCs participated in 302 events in 28 sports.

The China national under-23 football team, also known as the China Olympic team (国奥队), represents the People's Republic of China in international football competitions in the Olympic Games, Asian Games, as well as any other under-23 international football tournaments. It is governed by the Chinese Football Association (CFA). It combines two teams: China U-23 national team and China U-21 selection team.

Hu Jintao former General Secretary of the Communist Party of China

Hu Jintao is a Chinese politician who was the paramount leader of China from 2002 to 2012. He held the offices of General Secretary of the Communist Party from 2002 to 2012, President of the People's Republic from 2003 to 2013 and Chairman of the Central Military Commission from 2004 to 2012. He was a member of the Politburo Standing Committee, China's de facto top decision-making body, from 1992 to 2012.

Wei Di, who had previously worked for the State General Administration of Sports, was immediately brought in as the next Vice chairman and intended to kick corruption out of the Chinese game. One of his first assignments was to demote top tier clubs Chengdu Blades, Guangzhou F.C. and permanently ban Qingdao Hailifeng F.C. for their involvements in match-fixing. [12] He would go on to permanently ban over 33 Officials, Referees, Players and Coaches as well as voiding the 2003 league title during his tenure. [13] While he may have achieved his goal of kicking corruption out of the Chinese game Wei Di was criticized for his lack of football knowledge and bowing down to sponsorship pressure when he hired José Antonio Camacho to coach the men's national team who failed to qualify for the 2014 FIFA World Cup as well as succumbing to their worst ever defeat of 8-0 to Brazil and subsequently guiding China to their worst ever FIFA World Rankings of 109. [14] These underwhelming results as well as the political change of Xi Jinping as the new General Secretary of the Communist Party of China from 2012, saw Wei Di replaced by Zhang Jian. [15]

Guangzhou Evergrande Taobao F.C. Chinese professional football club

Guangzhou Evergrande Taobao Football Club is a professional Chinese football club that participates in the Chinese Super League under the license of the Chinese Football Association. The team is based in Guangzhou, Guangdong, and their home stadium is the Tianhe Stadium which has a seating capacity of 58,500. Their majority shareholders are the Evergrande Real Estate Group (56.71%) and the e-commerce company Alibaba Group (37.81%), while the rest of the shares are traded in the Chinese OTC system.

Qingdao Hailifeng F.C.

Qingdao Hailifeng F.C., previously named Qingdao JVC Zhengyi, Qingdao Benda, Hefei Chuangyi, Qingdao Aokema and Qingdao Haixin is a former professional association football club in the Chinese Football Association Jia League. The club was engaged in "bribery and private business dealing" in matches held in 2007 and 2009 and was banned from all future national matches organised by the Chinese Football Association.

The 2003 Chinese Jia-A League season is the tenth season of professional association football and the 42nd top-tier overall league season in China. The league started on March 15 and ended on November 30, 2003 while in preparation for the rebranded Chinese Super League three teams were relegated at the end of the season.

Member associations

As of 2015, there are total 44 member associations directly affiliated to the CFA. [16] The members are:

Chinese Football Association officials

When the Chinese Football Association re-established themselves in 1955, they would be a subordinate of the General Administration of Sport and would hire a president who had served with the Chinese national football team as either a manager or player during their career. This would change in 1989 when the association demanded more professionalism and started to separate itself as a non-governmental and a nonprofit organization and hired a first vice president, which is usually held by the head of the governmental agency—Management Center of Football, [note 1] to oversee the development of football in China. Dealing with the administration of disciplinary matters, the league and general organization of the national team, including the hiring and dismissing of national team managers, has made this role become the most prominent position within the whole of the CFA, while the role of the president has become purely ceremonial. The headquarters are located in Beijing. The current president is Cai Zhenhua, and the first vice president as well as the general secretary is Zhang Jian, who is the person in charge actually.

NamePositionSource
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Chen Xuyuan President [17]
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg [Du Zhaocai]]Vice President [17]
Yi Louis Liu General Secretary [17]
n/aTreasurer
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Chris van Puyvelde Technical Director [17]
Flag of Italy.svg Marcello Lippi Team Coach (Men's) [17]
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Jia Xiuquan Team Coach (Women's) [17]
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Huang Shiwei Media/Communications Manager [17]
n/aFutsal Coordinator
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Tan Hai Referee Coordinator [17]

Football competitions

Beach football

Notes

  1. Management Center of Football is in fact the same bureau with CFA.

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Beijing Sinobo Guoan F.C. association football club

Beijing Sinobo Guoan F.C. is a professional Chinese football club that currently participates in the Chinese Super League under licence from the Chinese Football Association (CFA). The team is based in the Chaoyang District in Beijing and their home stadium is the Workers' Stadium with a seating capacity of 66,161. Their shareholders are the real estate company Sinobo Group (64%) and CITIC Limited (36%) of CITIC Group, a state-owned enterprise of China. Beijing Guoan F.C. was founded as a professional team by CITIC Guoan Group, which was a subsidiary of CITIC Group until 2014.

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Guangdong Southern Tigers F.C.

Guangdong Southern Tigers Football Club or simply Guangdong Southern Tigers is a professional Chinese football club that currently participates in the China League One division under licence from the Chinese Football Association (CFA). The team is based in Meixian District, Meizhou, Guangdong and their home stadium is the Meixian Tsang Hin-chi Stadium that has a seating capacity of 20,221. Their current majority shareholder is engineering, and construction company Shenzhen Techand Ecological Environment Co., Ltd.

Jiangxi Liansheng F.C.

Jiangxi Liansheng Football Club is a professional Chinese football club that currently participates in the China League Two division under licence from the Chinese Football Association (CFA). The team is based in Nanchang, Jiangxi, and their new home stadium is the 31,000 capacity Jiujiang Stadium where they are owned by the Jiujiang Liansheng Group.

Meizhou Hakka F.C.

Meizhou Hakka Football Club, is a professional Chinese football club that currently participates in the China League One division under licence from the Chinese Football Association (CFA). The team is based in Wuhua County, Meizhou in the province of Guangdong and their home stadium is the 6,800 capacity Wuhua County Stadium. Their current majority shareholders are the Meizhou municipal government, Municipal Sports Bureau, Wei Real Estate Development Co Ltd and partners. The club was renamed Meizhou Wuhua Football Club according to Meizhou Daily. However, the original name was still used in official documents of CFA all the time.

Baoding Yingli Yitong F.C.

Baoding Yingli Yitong is a professional Chinese football club that participates in the China League One division under licence from the Chinese Football Association (CFA). The team is based in Baoding, Hebei and their home stadium is the 13,000 capacity Baoding People's Stadium. Their owner is the Baoding City Real Estate Group Co., Ltd.

Nantong Zhiyun F.C.

Nantong Zhiyun Football Club is a professional Chinese football club that currently participates in the China League One division under licence from the Chinese Football Association (CFA). The team is based in Nantong, Jiangsu and their home stadium is the 15,000 capacity Rugao Olympic Sports Center. The club's founder and owner are the Nantong Municipal Football Association.

Anhui Litian F. C.(Chinese: 安徽力天足球俱乐部) is a Chinese football club based in Hefei, Anhui Province.

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