Chinese Football Association

Last updated
Chinese Football Association
AFC
Chinese Football Association logo.svg
Founded
  • 1924 (original)
  • 1955 (as CFA) [1]
FIFA affiliation1931
AFC affiliation1974
EAFF affiliation2002
President Chen Xuyuan
Website www.thecfa.cn
Chinese Football Association
Simplified Chinese 中国足球协会
Traditional Chinese 中國足球協會

The Chinese Football Association (CFA) is the governing body of association football, [2] [3] beach soccer and futsal in Mainland China. Originally formed in Beijing in 1924, the association would affiliate itself with FIFA in 1931 before relocating to Taiwan following the end of Chinese Civil War (see Chinese Taipei Football Association). CFA joined the Asian Football Confederation in 1974 [4] followed up by FIFA once more in 1979. Since rejoining FIFA, CFA claims to be a non-governmental and a nonprofit organization but in fact is the same bureau with Management Center of Football which is a department of the State General Administration of Sports. [5]

Contents

Member association

As of 2015, there are total 44 member associations directly affiliated to CFA. [6] The members are:

Official

When the Chinese Football Association was re-established in 1955, it would be a subordinate of the General Administration of Sport and would hire a president who had served with the China PR national football team as either a manager or player. This would change in 1989 when the association demanded more professionalism and started to separate itself as a non-governmental and a nonprofit organization and hired a first vice president which is usually held by the head of the governmental agency—Management Center of Football. [note 1] Dealing with the administration of disciplinary matters, the league and general organization of the national team including the hiring and dismissing of national team managers has made this role become the most prominent position within the whole of CFA while the role of the president has become more ceremonial.

NamePositionSource
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Chen Xuyuan President [7] [8]
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Du Zhaocai Vice President [7] [8]
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Sun Wen 2nd Vice President [8]
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Gao Hongbo 3rd Vice President [8]
Louis Liu Yi General Secretary [7] [8]
n/aTreasurer
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Chris van Puyvelde Technical Director [7] [8]
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Li Tie Team Coach (Men's) [7] [8]
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Jia Xiuquan Team Coach (Women's) [7]
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Dai Xiaowei Media/Communications Manager [7]
n/aFutsal Coordinator
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Liu Tiejun Referee Coordinator [7]

Competition

Note

  1. Management Center of Football is in fact the same bureau with CFA.

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References

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  2. "Chinese officials want clue to Japan's soccer success|China". chinadaily.com.cn. China Daily. 2011-10-19. Retrieved 2013-11-17.
  3. Frank, Joshua (June 19, 2010). "Missing from the World Cup? China - Los Angeles Times". Los Angeles Times . Retrieved 2012-10-31.
  4. "AFC Bars Israel From All Its Competitions". The Straits Times . Reuters. 16 September 1974.
  5. "Chinese Football Association". Chinaculture.org. 1955-01-03. Archived from the original on 2012-04-04. Retrieved 2012-10-31.
  6. "2015中国足球协会业余联赛大区赛分区情况". Chinese Football Association. April 29, 2015. Retrieved 2015-04-29.
  7. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 "Member Association - China PR - FIFA.com". www.fifa.com.
  8. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "The AFC.com - The Asian Football Confederation". The AFC. Retrieved 2020-08-24.