22nd Annual Grammy Awards

Last updated
22nd Annual Grammy Awards
DateFebruary 27, 1980
Location Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles
Hosted by Kenny Rogers
Television/radio coverage
NetworkCBS

The 22nd Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 27, 1980, at Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles, and were broadcast live on American television. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the year 1979. This year was notable for being the first year to have a designated category for Rock music. [1] [2]

Shrine Auditorium large event venue in Los Angeles, California

The Shrine Auditorium is a landmark large-event venue in Los Angeles, California. It is also the headquarters of the Al Malaikah Temple, a division of the Shriners. It was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1975.

Los Angeles City in California

Los Angeles, officially the City of Los Angeles and often known by its initials L.A., is the most populous city in California, the second most populous city in the United States, after New York City, and the third most populous city in North America. With an estimated population of nearly four million, Los Angeles is the cultural, financial, and commercial center of Southern California. The city is known for its Mediterranean climate, ethnic diversity, Hollywood, the entertainment industry, and its sprawling metropolis. Los Angeles is the largest city on the West Coast of North America.

Contents

Album of the Year went to Phil Ramone and Billy Joel for 52nd Street , and Song of the Year went to Kenny Loggins and Michael McDonald for "What a Fool Believes".

Phil Ramone American recording engineer, record producer and violinist

Philip Ramone was a South African-born American recording engineer, record producer, violinist and composer, who in 1958 co-founded A & R Recording, Inc., a recording studio with business partner Jack Arnold at 112 West 48th Street, New York, upstairs from the famous musicians' watering hole, Jim & Andy's, and several doors east of Manny's Music. The success of the original A&R Recording allowed it to expand into several studios and a record production company. He was described by Billboard as "legendary", and the BBC as a "CD pioneer".

Billy Joel American singer-songwriter and pianist

William Martin Joel is an American singer-songwriter, composer and pianist. Commonly nicknamed the "Piano Man" after his signature song of the same name, he has led a commercially successful career as a solo artist since the 70s, having released twelve studio albums from 1971 to 1993. He is one of the best-selling music artists of all time as well as the sixth best-selling recording artist and the third best-selling solo artist in the United States, with over 150 million records sold worldwide. His 1985 compilation album, Greatest Hits Vol. 1 & 2, is one of the best-selling albums in the US.

<i>52nd Street</i> (album) 1978 studio album by Billy Joel

52nd Street is the sixth studio album by American singer-songwriter Billy Joel, released in 1978. The follow-up to his breakthrough success album, The Stranger, Joel tried to give the album a fresh sound, hiring various jazz musicians to make it feel differentiated from his previous album efforts. It was the first of four Joel albums to top the Billboard charts, and it earned him two Grammys. Three songs reached the Top 40 in the United States, contributing to the album's success: "My Life" (#3), "Big Shot" (#14), and "Honesty". It was similarly well received by critics, earning the 1979 Grammy for Album of the Year. This Grammy was presented to its producer, Phil Ramone. Upon Ramone's death, 52nd Street's Album of the Year Grammy was passed on to Joel. Additionally, the album is notable for being among the first albums commercially released on the compact disc format, reaching store shelves on October 1, 1982 in Japan. In keeping with this history, it was also the first release when Sony returned to manufacturing vinyl records in 2018.

Winners

Record of the Year
What a Fool Believes single

"What a Fool Believes" is a song written by Michael McDonald and Kenny Loggins. The best-known version was recorded by The Doobie Brothers for their 1978 album Minute by Minute. Debuting at number 73 on January 20, 1979, the single reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on April 14, 1979 for one week. The song received Grammy Awards in 1980 for both Song of the Year and Record of the Year.

The Doobie Brothers are an American rock band from San Jose, California. The group has sold more than 40 million albums worldwide. They have been active for five decades, with their greatest success in the 1970s.

Ted Templeman is an American record producer.

Album of the Year
<i>Minute by Minute</i> 1978 studio album by The Doobie Brothers

Minute by Minute is the eighth studio album by American rock band The Doobie Brothers, released on December 1, 1978 by Warner Bros. Records. It was their first without Tom Johnston as a full-fledged member of the band, and would be the last to include members Jeff "Skunk" Baxter and John Hartman.

<i>The Gambler</i> (album) 1978 studio album by Kenny Rogers

The Gambler is the sixth studio album by Kenny Rogers, released by United Artists in December 1978. One of his most popular, it has established Rogers' status as one of the most successful artists of the 1970s and 1980s. The album reached many markets around the world, such as the Far East and Jamaica, with Rogers later commenting "When I go to Korea or Hong Kong people say 'Ah, the gambler!'". The album has sold over 35 million copies.

Kenny Rogers American country singer and songwriter

Kenneth Ray Rogers is an American singer, songwriter, actor, record producer, and entrepreneur. He is a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame.

Song of the Year
Kenny Loggins American singer-songwriter, guitarist, recording artist

Kenneth Clark Loggins is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist. His early songs were recorded with the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band in 1970, which led to seven albums recorded as Loggins and Messina from 1972 to 1977. As a solo artist, Loggins experienced a string of soundtrack successes, including an Academy Award nomination for "Footloose" in 1984. His early soundtrack contributions date back to A Star Is Born in 1976, and for much of the 1980s and 1990s he was known as the Soundtrack King. Finally Home was released in 2013, shortly after Loggins formed the group Blue Sky Riders with Gary Burr and Georgia Middleman.

Best New Artist

Children's

The Grammy Award for Best Album for Children was awarded from 1959 to 1993. Prior to 1992, the award was known as Best Recording for Children and was therefore open to any audio recording, whether it was an album, a single song, a recording of a book, or the audio from a television show or movie. In 1994, the award was divided into Best Musical Album for Children and Best Spoken Word Album for Children. In 2012, both categories were once again combined into the new Best Children's Album category.

Jim Henson 20th-century American puppeteer

James Maury Henson was an American puppeteer, animator, cartoonist, voice actor, inventor, filmmaker, and screenwriter who achieved worldwide notice as the creator of The Muppets (1955–) and Fraggle Rock (1983–1987); and as the director of The Dark Crystal (1982) and Labyrinth (1986). He was born in Greenville, Mississippi and raised in Leland, Mississippi and University Park, Maryland.

Paul Williams (songwriter) American composer, singer, songwriter and actor

Paul Hamilton Williams Jr. is an American composer, singer, songwriter and actor. He is known for writing and co-writing popular songs performed by a number of acts in the 1970s, including Three Dog Night's "An Old Fashioned Love Song" and "Out in the Country," Helen Reddy's "You and Me Against the World," David Bowie's "Fill Your Heart" and the Carpenters' "We've Only Just Begun" and "Rainy Days and Mondays." Williams is also known for his musical contributions to films, including the Academy Award-nominated song "Rainbow Connection" from The Muppet Movie, and penning the lyrics to the #1 chart-topping song "Evergreen," the love theme from the Barbra Streisand film A Star Is Born, for which he won a Grammy for Song of the Year and an Academy Award for Best Original Song. He wrote the lyrics to the opening theme for the television show The Love Boat, with music previously composed by Charles Fox, which was originally sung by Jack Jones and, later, by Dionne Warwick.

Classical

Comedy

Best Comedy Recording

Composing and arranging

Best Instrumental Composition
Best Album of Original Score Written for a Motion Picture or a Television Special
Best Instrumental Arrangement
Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocals

Country

Best Country Vocal Performance, Female
Best Country Vocal Performance, Male
Best Country Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group
Best Country Instrumental Performance
Best Country Song

Disco

The award for Best Disco Recording was first given out at the 1980 Grammy Awards; however, this was the only year it was ever presented.

Best Disco Recording

Folk

Gospel

Historical

Jazz

Latin

Musical show

Packaging and notes

Pop

Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female
Best Pop Vocal Performance, Male
Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo, Group or Chorus
Best Pop Instrumental Performance

Production and engineering

R&B

Best R&B Vocal Performance, Female
Best R&B Vocal Performance, Male
Best R&B Vocal Performance by a Duo, Group or Chorus
Best R&B Instrumental Performance
Best R&B Song

Rock

Best Rock Vocal Performance, Female
Best Rock Vocal Performance, Male
Best Rock Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group
Best Rock Instrumental Performance

Spoken

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References

  1. "Doobies top Grammy parade". The Milwaukee Sentinel. 28 February 1980. Retrieved 1 May 2011.
  2. "1979 Grammy Award Winners". Grammy.com. Retrieved 1 May 2011.