Grammy Award for Producer of the Year, Non-Classical

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Grammy Award for Producer of the Year, Non-Classical
Awarded foroutstanding record producers of non-classical music
CountryUnited States
Presented by National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
First awardedApril 13, 1965;53 years ago (1965-04-13)
Last awarded2018
Website grammy.com

The Grammy Award for Producer of the Year, Non-Classical is an honor presented to remixers for quality remixed recordings at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards. [1] Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". [2]

A remix is a piece of media which has been altered from its original state by adding, removing, and/or changing pieces of the item. A song, piece of artwork, books, video, or photograph can all be remixes. The only characteristic of a remix is that it appropriates and changes other materials to create something new.

Grammy Award accolade by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States

A Grammy Award, or Grammy, is an award presented by The Recording Academy to recognize achievements in the music industry. The annual presentation ceremony features performances by prominent artists, and the presentation of those awards that have a more popular interest. The Grammys are the second of the Big Three major music awards held annually.

Contents

The award was first presented at the Grammy Awards in 1975. According to the category description guide for the 52nd Grammy Awards, the award is presented to producers who "represent consistently outstanding creativity in the area of record production". [3]

Recipients

Year [I] ProducerNomineesRef.
1975 Thom Bell [4]
1976 Arif Mardin [5]
1977 Stevie Wonder [6]
1978 Peter Asher [7]
1979 Bee Gees, Albhy Galuten and Karl Richardson [8]
1980 Larry Butler [9]
1981 Phil Ramone [10]
1982 Quincy Jones [11]
1983 Toto [12]
1984 Michael Jackson and Quincy Jones [13]
1985 James Anthony Carmichael and Lionel Richie, tied with

David Foster

[14] [15] [16]
1986 Phil Collins and Hugh Padgham [17]
1987 Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis [18]
1988 Narada Michael Walden [19]
1989 Neil Dorfsman [20]
1990 Peter Asher [21]
1991 Quincy Jones [22]
1992 David Foster [23]
1993 Brian Eno and Daniel Lanois , tied with L.A. Reid and Babyface [24]
1994 David Foster [25]
1995 Don Was [26]
1996 Babyface [27]
1997 Babyface [28]
1998 Babyface [29]
1999 Rob Cavallo [30]
2000 Walter Afanasieff [31]
2001 Dr. Dre [32]
2002 T-Bone Burnett [33]
2003 Arif Mardin [34]
2004 The Neptunes [35]
2005 John Shanks [36]
2006 Steve Lillywhite [37]
2007 Rick Rubin [38]
2008 Mark Ronson [39]
2009 Rick Rubin [40]
2010 Brendan O'Brien [41]
2011 Danger Mouse [42]
2012 Paul Epworth [43]
2013 Dan Auerbach [44]
2014 Pharrell Williams [45]
2015 Max Martin [46]
2016 Jeff Bhasker [47]
2017 Greg Kurstin [48]
2018 Greg Kurstin [49]
2019 Pharrell Williams [50]

^[I] Each year is linked to the article about the Grammy Awards held that year.

Multiple wins and nominations

Wins

Babyface (musician) American songwriter, singer and record producer

Kenneth Brian Edmonds, known professionally as Babyface, is an American singer, songwriter and record producer. He has written and produced over 26 number-one R&B hits throughout his career, and has won 11 Grammy Awards. He was ranked number 20 on NME's 50 Of The Greatest Producers Ever list.

David Foster Canadian musician, record producer, songwriter

David Walter Foster, OC, OBC, is a Canadian musician, record producer, composer, songwriter, and arranger. He has been a producer for musicians including Chaka Khan, Alice Cooper, Christina Aguilera, Andrea Bocelli, Toni Braxton, Michael Bublé, Chicago, Natalie Cole, Celine Dion, Kenny G, Josh Groban, Brandy Norwood, Whitney Houston, Jennifer Lopez, Kenny Rogers, Seal, Rod Stewart, Jake Zyrus, Donna Summer, Olivia Newton-John, Madonna, Mary J. Blige, Michael Jackson, Peter Cetera, Cheryl Lynn and Barbra Streisand. Foster has won 16 Grammy Awards from 47 nominations. He was the chairman of Verve Records from 2012 to 2016.

Quincy Jones American record producer, conductor, arranger, composer, television producer, and trumpeter

Quincy Delight Jones Jr. is an American record producer, musician, composer, and film producer. His career spans six decades in the entertainment industry with a record 80 Grammy Award nominations, 28 Grammys, and a Grammy Legend Award in 1992.

Nominations

Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis American R&B songwriting and record production team

James Samuel "Jimmy Jam" Harris III and Terry Steven Lewis are an American R&B songwriting and record production team. They have enjoyed great success since the 1980s with various artists, most notably Janet Jackson. They have written 31 top ten hits in the UK and 41 in the US.

Rob Cavallo American record producer, audio engineer

Robert Siers "Rob" Cavallo is an American record producer, musician, and record industry executive. Primarily known for his production work with Green Day, he has also worked with Linkin Park, My Chemical Romance, Eric Clapton, the Goo Goo Dolls, the Dave Matthews Band, Kid Rock, Jawbreaker, Alanis Morissette, Black Sabbath, Phil Collins, Paramore, Sixpence None the Richer, Lil Peep, Shinedown, and Meat Loaf. He is also a multiple Grammy Award winner.

Nigel Godrich English record producer and sound engineer

Nigel Timothy Godrich is an English record producer, recording engineer and musician. He is known for his work with the English rock band Radiohead, having produced all their studio albums since OK Computer (1997) and most of singer Thom Yorke's solo work. He is a member of Atoms for Peace and Ultraísta. Other acts Godrich has worked with include Beck, Paul McCartney, U2, R.E.M., Pavement and Roger Waters. He is the creator of the music webseries From the Basement.

See also

Related Research Articles

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