Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance

Last updated
Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance
Awarded forQuality performances in the heavy metal music genre
CountryUnited States
Presented by The Recording Academy
First awarded1989
Currently held by High on Fire, "Electric Messiah" (2019)
Website grammy.com

The Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance is an award presented at the Grammy Awards to recording artists for works (songs or albums) containing quality performances in the heavy metal music genre. The Grammy Awards is an annual ceremony, where honors in several categories are presented by The Recording Academy of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". [1] The ceremony was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards. [2]

Grammy Award accolade by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States

A Grammy Award, or Grammy, is an award presented by The Recording Academy to recognize achievements in the music industry. The annual presentation ceremony features performances by prominent artists, and the presentation of those awards that have a more popular interest. The Grammys are the second of the Big Three major music awards held annually.

Heavy metal is a genre of rock music that developed in the late 1960s and early 1970s, largely in the United Kingdom. With roots in blues rock, psychedelic rock, and acid rock, the bands that created heavy metal developed a thick, massive sound, characterized by highly amplified distortion, extended guitar solos, emphatic beats, and overall loudness. The genre's lyrics and performance styles are sometimes associated with aggression and machismo.

The Recording Academy U.S. organization of musicians, producers, recording engineers and other recording professionals

The Recording Academy is a U.S. organization of musicians, producers, recording engineers, and other recording professionals. It is headquartered in Santa Monica, California. Neil Portnow is its current president.

Contents

The Recording Academy recognized heavy metal music artists for the first time at the 31st Annual Grammy Awards (1989). The category was originally presented as Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance Vocal or Instrumental, combining two of the most popular music genres of the 1980s. [3] Jethro Tull won that award for the album Crest of a Knave , beating Metallica, which were expected to win with the album ...And Justice for All . This choice led to widespread criticism of The Recording Academy, as journalists suggested that the music of Jethro Tull did not belong in the hard rock or heavy metal genres. [4] [5] In response, The Recording Academy created the categories Best Hard Rock Performance and Best Metal Performance, separating the genres.

The 31st Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 22, 1989, at Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the previous year.

The Grammy Award for Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance Vocal or Instrumental was an award presented at the 31st Grammy Awards in 1989 to honor quality hard rock/metal works. The Grammy Awards, an annual ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards, are presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position."

Popular music is music with wide appeal that is typically distributed to large audiences through the music industry. These forms and styles can be enjoyed and performed by people with little or no musical training. It stands in contrast to both art music and traditional or "folk" music. Art music was historically disseminated through the performances of written music, although since the beginning of the recording industry, it is also disseminated through recordings. Traditional music forms such as early blues songs or hymns were passed along orally, or to smaller, local audiences.

The Best Metal Performance category was first presented at the 32nd Annual Grammy Awards in 1990, and was again the subject of controversy when rock musician Chris Cornell (lead vocalist for the band Soundgarden) was perplexed by the organization's nomination of the band Dokken in this category. [6] Metallica won in the first three years. The awards were presented for the song "One", a cover version of Queen's "Stone Cold Crazy", and the album Metallica . During 2012–2013, the award was temporarily discontinued in a major overhaul of Grammy categories; all solo or duo/group performances in the hard rock and metal categories were shifted to the newly formed Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance category. However, in 2014, the Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance category was split, returning the Best Metal Performance category and recognizing quality hard rock performances in the Best Rock Performance category. [7]

32nd Annual Grammy Awards award ceremony

The 32nd Annual Grammy Awards were held in 1990. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the previous year.

Chris Cornell American singer-songwriter, musician

Christopher John Cornell was an American musician, singer and songwriter. He was best known as the lead vocalist for the rock bands Soundgarden and Audioslave. Cornell was also known for his numerous solo works and soundtrack contributions since 1991, and as the founder and frontman for Temple of the Dog, the one-off tribute band dedicated to his late friend Andrew Wood.

Soundgarden American grunge rock band

Soundgarden was an American rock band formed in Seattle, Washington, in 1984 by singer and rhythm guitarist Chris Cornell, lead guitarist Kim Thayil, and bassist Hiro Yamamoto. Matt Cameron became the band's full-time drummer in 1986, while bassist Ben Shepherd became a permanent replacement for Yamamoto in 1990. The band dissolved in 1997 and re-formed in 2010. Following Cornell's death in 2017, Thayil became the last remaining original member.

As of 2011, Metallica holds the record for the most wins in this category, with a total of six. The bands Black Sabbath, Nine Inch Nails, Slayer, and Tool have each received the award twice. The band Ministry holds the record for the most nominations without a win, with six.

Black Sabbath British heavy metal band

Black Sabbath were an English rock band, formed in Birmingham in 1968, by guitarist and main songwriter Tony Iommi, bassist and main lyricist Geezer Butler, drummer Bill Ward, and singer Ozzy Osbourne. Black Sabbath are often cited as pioneers of heavy metal music. The band helped define the genre with releases such as Black Sabbath (1970), Paranoid (1970), and Master of Reality (1971). The band had multiple line-up changes, with Iommi being the only constant member throughout its history.

Nine Inch Nails American industrial rock band

Nine Inch Nails, commonly abbreviated as NIN, is an American industrial rock band that was formed in Cleveland, Ohio in 1988. The band consists of producer and multi-instrumentalist Trent Reznor, as well as English musician Atticus Ross. Over the course of their three-decade existence, the band has signed with several major labels, the most current being Capitol Records, under the name The Null Corporation.

Slayer American thrash metal band

Slayer is an American thrash metal band from Huntington Park, California. The band was formed in 1981 by vocalist and bassist Tom Araya and guitarists Kerry King and Jeff Hanneman. Slayer's fast and aggressive musical style made them one of the founding "big four" bands of thrash metal, alongside Metallica, Megadeth and Anthrax. Slayer's current lineup comprises King, Araya, drummer Paul Bostaph and guitarist Gary Holt. Hanneman and drummers Dave Lombardo and Jon Dette are former members of the band.

Recipients

Members of the six-time award-winning band, Metallica Metallica at The O2 Arena London 2008.jpg
Members of the six-time award-winning band, Metallica
Trent Reznor of the two-time award-winning band, Nine Inch Nails Trent-Reznor 2009.jpg
Trent Reznor of the two-time award-winning band, Nine Inch Nails
1994 award winner, Ozzy Osbourne Ozzy on tour in Japan.jpg
1994 award winner, Ozzy Osbourne
Jonathan Davis of the 2003 award-winning band, Korn Korn 03322006 Milwaukee.jpg
Jonathan Davis of the 2003 award-winning band, Korn
Lemmy of the 2005 award-winning band, Motorhead Motorhead-01.jpg
Lemmy of the 2005 award-winning band, Motörhead
Members of the 2006 award-winning band, Slipknot Slipknot Live in Toronto, 2005 6.jpg
Members of the 2006 award-winning band, Slipknot
Members of the two-time award-winning band, Slayer Slayer, The Fields of Rock, 2007.jpg
Members of the two-time award-winning band, Slayer
Members of the 2010 award-winning band, Judas Priest Judas Priest Retribution 2005 Tour.jpg
Members of the 2010 award-winning band, Judas Priest
Members of the 2011 award-winning band, Iron Maiden Iron Maiden in the Palais Omnisports of Paris-Bercy (France).jpg
Members of the 2011 award-winning band, Iron Maiden
Members of the two-time award-winning band, Black Sabbath Sabs.jpg
Members of the two-time award-winning band, Black Sabbath
Year [I] Performing artist(s)WorkNomineesRef.
1990 Metallica "One" [8]
1991 Metallica "Stone Cold Crazy" [9]
1992 Metallica Metallica [10]
1993 Nine Inch Nails "Wish" [11]
1994 Ozzy Osbourne "I Don't Want to Change the World" (live) [12]
1995 Soundgarden "Spoonman" [13]
1996 Nine Inch Nails "Happiness in Slavery" (live) [14]
[15]
1997 Rage Against the Machine "Tire Me" [16]
1998 Tool "Ænema" [17]
1999 Metallica "Better Than You" [18]
2000 Black Sabbath "Iron Man" (live) [19]
2001 Deftones "Elite" [20]
2002 Tool "Schism" [21]
2003 Korn "Here to Stay" [22]
2004 Metallica "St. Anger" [23]
2005 Motörhead "Whiplash" [24]
2006 Slipknot "Before I Forget" [25]
2007 Slayer "Eyes of the Insane" [26]
2008 Slayer "Final Six" [27]
2009 Metallica "My Apocalypse" [28]
2010 Judas Priest "Dissident Aggressor" (live) [29]
2011 Iron Maiden "El Dorado" [30]
2014 Black Sabbath "God Is Dead?" [31]
2015 Tenacious D "The Last in Line" [32]
2016 Ghost "Cirice" [33]
2017 Megadeth "Dystopia" [34]
2018 Mastodon "Sultan's Curse" [35]
2019 High on Fire "Electric Messiah" [36]

^[I] Each year is linked to the article about the Grammy Awards held that year.

See also

This is a timeline of heavy metal and hard rock, from its beginning in the early 1960s to the present time.

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References

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