God Is Dead?

Last updated
"God Is Dead?"
Black Sabbath God Is Dead.jpg
Single by Black Sabbath
from the album 13
Released19 April 2013
Recordedc. August 2012 January 2013
Genre Doom metal [1]
Length8:54
Label Republic
Songwriter(s) Geezer Butler, Tony Iommi, Ozzy Osbourne
Producer(s) Rick Rubin
Black Sabbath singles chronology
"The Devil Cried"
(2007)
"God Is Dead?"
(2013)
"End of the Beginning"
(2013)
Music video
"God Is Dead?" on YouTube

"God Is Dead?" is a song by heavy metal band Black Sabbath featured on the album 13 . It is the first single from the album, and the first with Ozzy Osbourne since 1998's "Psycho Man" and "Selling My Soul" from Reunion . The song was released via an MP3 download on Amazon. [2] It was also available as a free download to those who pre-ordered the full album on iTunes. The song in its entirety was posted on the official YouTube channel in promotion of this. Both the song title and figure on the single's cover, by Heather Cassils, are a reference to Friedrich Nietzsche, a German philosopher who is famous for saying that "God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him. How shall we comfort ourselves, the murderers of all murderers?". [3]

Heavy metal is a genre of rock music that developed in the late 1960s and early 1970s, largely in the United Kingdom. With roots in blues rock, psychedelic rock, and acid rock, the bands that created heavy metal developed a thick, massive sound, characterized by highly amplified distortion, extended guitar solos, emphatic beats, and overall loudness. The genre's lyrics and performance styles are sometimes associated with aggression and machismo.

Black Sabbath British heavy metal band

Black Sabbath were an English rock band, formed in Birmingham in 1968, by guitarist and main songwriter Tony Iommi, bassist and main lyricist Geezer Butler, drummer Bill Ward, and singer Ozzy Osbourne. Black Sabbath are often cited as pioneers of heavy metal music. The band helped define the genre with releases such as Black Sabbath (1970), Paranoid (1970), and Master of Reality (1971). The band had multiple line-up changes, with Iommi being the only constant member throughout its history.

<i>13</i> (Black Sabbath album) 2013 studio album by Black Sabbath

13 is the 19th and final studio album by English rock band Black Sabbath. The album was released on 10 June 2013 in Europe and 11 June 2013 in North America, via Vertigo Records and Republic Records in the United States, and via Vertigo Records worldwide. It is the only studio album released by Black Sabbath since Forbidden (1995), and was the band's first studio recording with original singer Ozzy Osbourne and bassist Geezer Butler since the live album Reunion (1998), which contained two new studio tracks. It was also the first studio album with Osbourne since Never Say Die! (1978), and with Butler since Cross Purposes (1994), the first since Never Say Die! not to feature longtime keyboardist Geoff Nicholls, and the first since The Eternal Idol (1987) on the Vertigo label.

"God Is Dead?" reached No. 6 on the UK Rock Charts. [4]

The music video, directed by Peter Joseph, known for the Zeitgeist film series, [5] was released on 10 June 2013.

Peter Joseph Filmmaker and social activist

Peter Joseph is an American independent filmmaker and activist. He is best known for the Zeitgeist film series, which he wrote, directed, narrated, scored, and produced. He is the founder of the related The Zeitgeist Movement. Other work includes The New Human Rights Movement: Reinventing the Economy to End Oppression, a book by Joseph which was published in 2017.

The song was featured in the second promo for the sixth season of Sons of Anarchy , a FX network television series.

<i>Sons of Anarchy</i> American television series

Sons of Anarchy is an American crime tragedy television series created by Kurt Sutter that aired from 2008 to 2014. It followed the lives of a close-knit outlaw motorcycle club operating in Charming, a fictional town in California's Central Valley. The show starred Charlie Hunnam as Jackson "Jax" Teller, who is initially the vice president and subsequently the president of the club following his stepfather and president, Clay Morrow, was demoted after a challenge vote was brought up by the club. He soon begins to question the club and himself. Brotherhood, loyalty and redemption are constant themes.

The song won the Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance on January 26, 2014. [6] This was Black Sabbath's first Grammy Award in 14 years. [7]

The Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance is an award presented at the Grammy Awards to recording artists for works containing quality performances in the heavy metal music genre. The Grammy Awards is an annual ceremony, where honors in several categories are presented by The Recording Academy of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". The ceremony was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards.

Personnel

Ozzy Osbourne English heavy metal vocalist and songwriter

John Michael "Ozzy" Osbourne, also known as The Prince of Darkness, is an English vocalist, songwriter, actor and reality television star who rose to prominence during the 1970s as the lead vocalist of the heavy metal band Black Sabbath. He was fired from the band in 1979 due to alcohol and drug problems, but went on to have a successful solo career, releasing eleven studio albums, the first seven of which were all awarded multi-platinum certifications in the United States. Osbourne has since reunited with Black Sabbath on several occasions. He rejoined the band in 1997 and recorded the group’s final studio album 13 (2013) before they embarked on a farewell tour which culminated in a final performance in their home city Birmingham, England in February 2017. His longevity and success have earned him the informal title of "Godfather of Heavy Metal".

Singing act of producing musical sounds with the voice

Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice and augments regular speech by the use of sustained tonality, rhythm, and a variety of vocal techniques. A person who sings is called a singer or vocalist. Singers perform music that can be sung with or without accompaniment by musical instruments. Singing is often done in an ensemble of musicians, such as a choir of singers or a band of instrumentalists. Singers may perform as soloists or accompanied by anything from a single instrument up to a symphony orchestra or big band. Different singing styles include art music such as opera and Chinese opera, Indian music and religious music styles such as gospel, traditional music styles, world music, jazz, blues, gazal and popular music styles such as pop, rock, electronic dance music and filmi.

Tony Iommi British guitarist

Anthony Frank Iommi is an English guitarist, songwriter and producer. He was lead guitarist and one of the four founder members of the heavy metal band Black Sabbath. He was the band's primary composer and sole continual member for nearly five decades.

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Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche was a German philosopher, cultural critic, composer, poet, philologist, and Latin and Greek scholar whose work has exerted a profound influence on Western philosophy and modern intellectual history. He began his career as a classical philologist before turning to philosophy. He became the youngest ever to hold the Chair of Classical Philology at the University of Basel in 1869 at the age of 24. Nietzsche resigned in 1879 due to health problems that plagued him most of his life; he completed much of his core writing in the following decade. In 1889 at age 44, he suffered a collapse and afterward, a complete loss of his mental faculties. He lived his remaining years in the care of his mother until her death in 1897 and then with his sister Elisabeth Förster-Nietzsche. Nietzsche died in 1900.

"Bruces' Philosophers Song " is a popular Monty Python song written and composed by Eric Idle that was a feature of the group's stage appearances and its recordings.

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References

  1. http://consequenceofsound.net/2013/04/listen-to-black-sabbaths-new-song-god-is-dead/
  2. "God Is Dead?: Black Sabbath: MP3 Downloads". Amazon.com. Retrieved 2013-05-13.
  3. "13 — Black Sabbath Online". Black-sabbath.com. Retrieved 2013-05-13.
  4. "2013-05-04 Top 40 Rock & Metal Singles Archive". Official Charts. 2013-05-04. Retrieved 2013-05-13.
  5. Black Sabbath (10 June 2013). "Black Sabbath – God Is Dead?". Vevo . Retrieved 11 June 2013.
  6. "Black Sabbath Wins 'Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance' Grammy Award". Blabbermouth.net. 2014-01-26. Retrieved 2014-01-26.
  7. "Black Sabbath Gives Statement About Grammy Nominations". wcsx.com. 2014-01-26. Archived from the original on 2013-12-13. Retrieved 2014-01-26.