Dissident Aggressor

Last updated
"Dissident Aggressor"
Song by Judas Priest
from the album Sin After Sin, A Touch of Evil: Live
Genre Heavy metal [1]
Label CBS, Inc. (UK)
Columbia Records (US)
Songwriter(s) Halford, Downing, Tipton

"Dissident Aggressor" is a song by the British heavy metal band Judas Priest that was first released on Sin After Sin in 1977. In 2010, thirty-three years after its release, the song won the 2010 Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance after being rereleased as a live track on A Touch of Evil: Live . [2]

Heavy metal is a genre of rock music that developed in the late 1960s and early 1970s, largely in the United Kingdom. With roots in blues rock, psychedelic rock, and acid rock, the bands that created heavy metal developed a thick, massive sound, characterized by highly amplified distortion, extended guitar solos, emphatic beats, and overall loudness. The genre's lyrics and performance styles are sometimes associated with aggression and machismo.

Judas Priest British heavy metal band

Judas Priest are an English heavy metal band formed in West Bromwich in 1969. The band has sold over 50 million copies of their albums to date. They are frequently ranked as one of the greatest metal bands of all time. Despite an innovative and pioneering body of work in the latter half of the 1970s, the band struggled with indifferent record production and lack of major commercial success or attention until 1980, when they adopted a more simplified sound on the album British Steel, which helped shoot them to rock superstar status.

<i>Sin After Sin</i> 1977 studio album by Judas Priest

Sin After Sin is the third studio album by English heavy metal band Judas Priest, released in 1977. It was remastered in 2001 with two bonus tracks added. According to guitarist K.K. Downing the album title was possibly inspired from a lyric in the Judas Priest-song "Genocide".

Contents

Description and analysis

"Dissident Aggressor" closes the album Sin After Sin , and is seguéd into from the slow ballad "Here Come the Tears". It is played aggressively on two guitars at a fast tempo; the bass and drums are heavy, and the vocals are screamed at high pitch. [3] [ page needed ] The song features what Rolling Stone describes as "driving guitar riffs", and guitarists K. K. Downing and Glenn Tipton trade solos in the song. [4] Rolling Stone further describes the song as an "apocalyptic epic". [5]

K. K. Downing British musician

Kenneth "K. K." Downing Jr. is a retired British guitarist and songwriter, co-founder of the heavy metal band Judas Priest, and an author.

Glenn Tipton British musician

Glenn Raymond Tipton is an English Grammy Award-winning guitar player and songwriter. Often noted for his complex playing style and classically influenced solos, he is best known as one of the lead guitarists for heavy metal band Judas Priest.

Influence on the genre

Judas Priest's 1977 album Sin After Sin introduced the combination of the double bass drum and rapid 16th bass rhythms combined with rapid 16th note guitar rhythms that came to define the genre. [1] While the double-bass rhythms from Judas Priest are generally measured and technical, "Dissident Aggressor" pushed this to be an example of the style with an increase in "tempo and aggression" [6] which was later adopted by other bands with a much harder-edged approach. [1]

Sixteenth note musical note duration

In music, a sixteenth note (American) or semiquaver (British) is a note played for half the duration of an eighth note (quaver), hence the names. It is the equivalent of the semifusa in mensural notation, first found in 15th-century notation.

The song features "groundbreaking vocal styles" [7] by Rob Halford which have since come to be regarded as influential. [7]

Rob Halford English rock singer

Robert John Arthur Halford is an English singer and songwriter. He is best known as the lead vocalist for the Grammy Award-winning heavy metal band Judas Priest. He is famous for his powerful wide-ranging voice and his trademark leather-and-studs image, both of which became iconic in heavy metal. In addition to his work with Judas Priest, he has been involved with several side projects, including Fight, Two, and Halford.

US thrash metal band Slayer covered the song on their 1988 album "South of Heaven". Ironically, Slayer were nominated for the "Best Metal Performance Grammy Award" in 2010, for the song "Hate Worldwide", but lost out to Priest's new live version, mentioned above.

Thrash metal is an extreme subgenre of heavy metal music characterized by its overall aggression and often fast tempo. The songs usually use fast percussive beats and low-register guitar riffs, overlaid with shredding-style lead guitar work. The lyrical subject matter is often sympathetic to liberal social issues and often deals with criticisms of The Establishment, and at times shares a disdain for Christian dogma resembling that of their black metal counterparts. The language is typically quite direct and denunciatory, an approach borrowed from hardcore punk.

Slayer American thrash metal band

Slayer is an American thrash metal band from Huntington Park, California. The band was formed in 1981 by guitarists Kerry King and Jeff Hanneman and vocalist and bassist Tom Araya. Slayer's fast and aggressive musical style made them one of the founding "big four" bands of thrash metal, alongside Metallica, Megadeth and Anthrax. Slayer's current lineup comprises King, Araya, drummer Paul Bostaph and guitarist Gary Holt. Hanneman and drummers Dave Lombardo and Jon Dette are former members of the band.

<i>South of Heaven</i> 1988 studio album by Slayer

South of Heaven is the fourth studio album by American thrash metal band Slayer. Released on July 5, 1988, the album was the band's second collaboration with record producer Rick Rubin, whose production skills on Slayer's previous album Reign in Blood had helped the band's sound evolve.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Cope, Andrew Laurence. Black Sabbath and the Rise of Heavy Metal Music. Ashgate Publishing. ISBN   9781409493983.
  2. "Judas Priest Grammy Nomination for Dissident Aggressor". Judaspriest.com. 4 December 2009. Archived from the original on 2010-12-13. Retrieved 7 November 2010.
  3. Riches, Gabby; Snell, Dave; Bardine, Bryan; Gardenour Walter, Brenda (2016). Heavy Metal Studies and Popular Culture. Palgrave Macmillan UK. ISBN   978-1-137-45668-7.
  4. Trunk, Eddie (2011). Eddie Trunk's Essential Hard Rock and Heavy Metal. Harry N. Abrams. ISBN   978-0810998315.
  5. Brackett, Nathan; Hoard, Christian (2004). The New Rolling Stone Album Guide. Simon & Schuster. p. 444. ISBN   0743201698 . Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  6. Andrew L. Cope (15 April 2016). Black Sabbath and the Rise of Heavy Metal Music. Routledge. p. 103. ISBN   978-1-317-17386-1.
  7. 1 2 Eddie Trunk (30 August 2011). Eddie Trunk’s Essential Hard Rock and Heavy Metal. Abrams. p. 307. ISBN   978-1-61312-142-9.