Grammy Award for Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media

Last updated
Grammy Award for Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media
Awarded forquality instrumental score soundtrack albums
CountryUnited States
Presented by National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
First awarded1959
Last awarded2018
Currently held by Justin Hurwitz, La La Land (2018)
Website grammy.com

The Grammy Award for Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media is an honor presented to a composer or composers for an original score created for a film, TV show or series, video games or other visual media [1] at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards. [2] Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position". [3]

Contents

It has been awarded since the 2nd Annual Grammy Awards in 1959. The first recipient was American composer and pianist Duke Ellington, for the soundtrack to the 1959 film Anatomy of a Murder . Originally known as the Grammy Award for Best Sound Track Album – Background Score from a Motion Picture or Television, the award is now known as the Grammy Award for Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media. [4] Until 2001, the award was presented to the composer of the music alone. [4] From 2001 to 2006, the producer and engineers shared in this award. [4] In 2007, the award reverted to a composer-only award. [4] John Williams holds the record for most wins and nominations for the award, with eleven wins out of thirty-two nominations.

The 2nd Annual Grammy Awards were held on November 29, 1959, at Los Angeles and New York. Hosted by Meredith Willson, this marked the first televised Grammy Award ceremony, and it was aired in episodes as special Sunday Showcase. It was held in the same year as the first Grammy Awards in 1959, and no award ceremony was held in 1960. These awards recognized musical accomplishments by performers for that particular year. Frank Sinatra and Duke Ellington each won three awards.

Duke Ellington American jazz musician, composer and band leader

Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington was an American composer, pianist, and leader of a jazz orchestra, which he led from 1923 until his death over a career spanning more than fifty years.

<i>Anatomy of a Murder</i> 1959 film by Otto Preminger

Anatomy of a Murder is a 1959 American courtroom drama crime film produced and directed by Otto Preminger. The screenplay by Wendell Mayes was based on the novel of the same name written by Michigan Supreme Court Justice John D. Voelker under the pen name Robert Traver. Voelker based the novel on a 1952 murder case in which he was the defense attorney.

Recipients

Duke Ellington was the first recipient of the award in 1959 for the Anatomy of a Murder soundtrack. Duke Ellington at the Hurricane Club 1943.jpg
Duke Ellington was the first recipient of the award in 1959 for the Anatomy of a Murder soundtrack.
The Beatles won the award in 1971 for the Let It Be soundtrack. The Beatles in America.JPG
The Beatles won the award in 1971 for the Let It Be soundtrack.
Prince and the Revolution won the award in 1985 for the Purple Rain soundtrack. Prince Brussels 1986.jpg
Prince and the Revolution won the award in 1985 for the Purple Rain soundtrack.
John Williams has won the award six times in a row, eleven times total and has been nominated twenty-one more times. John Williams tux.jpg
John Williams has won the award six times in a row, eleven times total and has been nominated twenty-one more times.
Howard Shore won the award (with John Kurlander and Peter Cobbin) for all three The Lord of the Rings films in 2003, 2004, 2005. Howard Shore, Canadian Film Centre, 2013-1.jpg
Howard Shore won the award (with John Kurlander and Peter Cobbin) for all three The Lord of the Rings films in 2003, 2004, 2005.
Two-time award winner Randy Newman. Randy Newman (1972).png
Two-time award winner Randy Newman.
Two-time award winner Thomas Newman. Thomas Newman.jpg
Two-time award winner Thomas Newman.
Chinese composer Tan Dun won the award in 2002 for the Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon soundtrack. He is the only Chinese composer to win the award. Tan Dun.JPG
Chinese composer Tan Dun won the award in 2002 for the Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon soundtrack. He is the only Chinese composer to win the award.
Nine-time award nominee Danny Elfman. Danny Elfman cropped.jpg
Nine-time award nominee Danny Elfman.
Trent Reznor (left) and Atticus Ross (right) of Nine Inch Nails won the award in 2013 for The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo soundtrack. Reznor Ross G5 setup cropped.jpg
Trent Reznor (left) and Atticus Ross (right) of Nine Inch Nails won the award in 2013 for The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo soundtrack.

Years reflect the year in which the Grammy Awards were presented, for works released in the previous year.

Year [lower-alpha 1] Winner(s)WorkNomineesRef.
1959 Duke Ellington Anatomy of a Murder [5]
1961 Ernest Gold Exodus
[6]
1962 Henry Mancini Breakfast at Tiffany's
[7]
1963 No award [8]
1964 John Addison Tom Jones
[9]
1965 Richard M. Sherman
Robert B. Sherman
Mary Poppins [10]
1966 Johnny Mandel The Sandpiper [11]
1967 Maurice Jarre Doctor Zhivago
[12]
1968 Lalo Schifrin Music from Mission: Impossible
[13]
1969 Dave Grusin
Paul Simon
The Graduate
[14]
1970 Burt Bacharach Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid [15]
1971 The Beatles [lower-alpha 2] Let It Be
[16]
1972 Isaac Hayes Shaft [17]
1973 Nino Rota The Godfather
[18]
1974 Neil Diamond Jonathan Livingston Seagull [19]
1975 Alan Bergman
Marilyn Bergman
Marvin Hamlisch
The Way We Were [20]
1976 John Williams Jaws
[21]
1977 Norman Whitfield Car Wash
[22]
1978 John Williams Star Wars [23]
1979 John Williams Close Encounters of the Third Kind
[24]
1980 John Williams Superman
[25]
1981 John Williams The Empire Strikes Back
[26]
1982 John Williams Raiders of the Lost Ark [27]
1983 John Williams E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial
[28]
1984 Various artists [lower-alpha 3] Flashdance
[29]
1985 Prince and the Revolution Purple Rain [30]
1986 Various artists [lower-alpha 4] Beverly Hills Cop [31]
1987 John Barry
(film music was nominated in the Best Instrumental Composition category)
Out of Africa [32]
1988 Ennio Morricone The Untouchables
[33]
1989 Various artists [lower-alpha 5] The Last Emperor
[34]
1990 Dave Grusin The Fabulous Baker Boys [35]
1991 James Horner Glory [36]
1992 John Barry Dances with Wolves [37]
1993 Alan Menken
(for the instrumental score portion of the soundtrack)
Beauty and the Beast [38]
1994 Alan Menken Aladdin [39]
1995 John Williams Schindler's List [40]
1996 Hans Zimmer Crimson Tide [41]
1997 David Arnold Independence Day
[42]
1998 Gabriel Yared The English Patient [43]
1999 John Williams Saving Private Ryan [44]
2000 Randy Newman A Bug's Life [45]
2001 Thomas Newman American Beauty [46]
2002 Tan Dun Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
[47]
2003 Howard Shore (composer)
John Kurlander (engineer/mixer)
The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring [48]
2004 Howard Shore (composer)
John Kurlander (engineer)
Peter Cobbin (engineer/mixer)
The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers [49]
2005 Howard Shore (composer)
John Kurlander (engineer)
Peter Cobbin (engineer/mixer)
The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King [50]
2006 Craig Armstrong Ray [51]
2007 John Williams Memoirs of a Geisha [52]
2008 Michael Giacchino Ratatouille [53]
2009 Hans Zimmer
James Newton Howard
The Dark Knight [54]
2010 Michael Giacchino Up [55]
2011 Randy Newman Toy Story 3 [56]
2012 Alexandre Desplat The King's Speech [57]
2013 Trent Reznor
Atticus Ross
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo [58]
2014 Thomas Newman Skyfall [59]
2015 Alexandre Desplat The Grand Budapest Hotel [60]
2016 Antonio Sánchez Birdman [61]
2017 John Williams Star Wars: The Force Awakens [62]
2018 Justin Hurwitz La La Land [63]
2019 Ludwig Göransson Black Panther [64]

Name changes

There have been several minor changes to the name of the award: [1] [4] [65]

YearName
1959Best Sound Track Album – Background Score from a Motion Picture or Television
1961–62Best Sound Track Album or Recording of Music Score from Motion Picture or Television
1964–68Best Original Score from a Motion Picture or Television Show
1969–73
1978
Best Original Score Written for a Motion Picture or a Television Special
1974–77Best Album of Best Original Score Written for a Motion Picture or a Television Special
1979–86Best Album of Original Score Written for a Motion Picture or a Television Special
1988–90Best Album of Original Instrumental Background Score Written for a Motion Picture or Television
1991–99Best Instrumental Composition Written for a Motion Picture or for Television
2000Best Instrumental Composition Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media
2001–11Best Score Soundtrack Album for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media
2012–
present
Best Score Soundtrack for Visual Media

See also

The Grammy Award for Best Compilation Soundtrack for Visual Media has been awarded since 2000. In 2000 the award was presented as the Grammy Award for Best Soundtrack Album, and from 2001 to 2011 as Best Compilation Soundtrack Album for Motion Pictures, Television or Other Visual Media.

Notes

  1. Each year is linked to the article about the Grammy Awards held that year.
  2. John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr
  3. For Flashdance, various artists include Giorgio Moroder, Laura Branigan, Keith Forsey, Irene Cara, Shandi Sinnamon, Ronald Magness, Doug Cotler, Richard Gilbert, Michael Boddicker, Jerry Hey, Phil Ramone, Michael Sembello, Kim Carnes, Duane Hitchings, Craig Krampf, and Dennis Matkosky
  4. For Beverly Hills Cop, various artists include Marc Benno, Harold Faltermeyer, Keith Forsey, Micki Free, John Gilutin Hawk, Howard Hewett, Bunny Hull, Howie Rice, Sharon Robinson, Danny Sembello, Sue Sheridan, Richard Theisen, and Allee Willis
  5. For The Last Emperor, various artists include David Byrne, Cong Su, and Ryuichi Sakamoto

Related Research Articles

The Grammy Award for Record of the Year is presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to sales or chart position." The Record of the Year award is one of the four most prestigious categories at the awards presented annually since the 1st Grammy Awards in 1959. According to the 54th Grammy Awards description guide, the award is presented:

for commercially released singles or tracks of new vocal or instrumental recordings. Tracks from a previous year's album may be entered provided the track was not entered the previous year and provided the album did not win a Grammy. Award to the artist(s), producer(s), recording engineer(s) and/or mixer(s) if other than the artist.

The Grammy Award for Best New Artist has been awarded since 1959. Years reflect the year in which the Grammy Awards were handed out, for records released in the previous year. The award was not presented in 1967. The official guidelines are as follows: "For a new artist who releases, during the Eligibility Year, the first recording which establishes the public identity of that artist." Note that this is not necessarily the first album released by an artist.

The Grammy Award for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group was awarded between 1991 and 2011, alongside the Grammy Award for Best Rap Solo Performance. Previously a single award was presented for Best Rap Performance.

The Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals has been awarded since 1963. The award is presented to the arranger of the music, not to the performer(s), except if the performer is also the arranger.

The Grammy Award for Best Historical Album has been presented since 1979. During this time the award had several minor name changes:

The Grammy Award for Best Album Notes has been presented since 1964. From 1973 to 1976, a separate award was presented for Best Album Notes – Classical. Those awards are listed under those years below. The award recognizes albums with excellent liner notes. It is presented to the liner notes author or authors, not to the artists or performers on the winning work, except if the artist is also the liner notes author.

The Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album has been awarded since 1959. The award had several minor name changes:

The Grammy Award for Best Recording Package is one of a series of Grammy Awards presented for the visual look of an album. It is presented to the art director of the winning album, not to the performer(s), unless the performer is also the art director.

The Grammy Award for Producer of the Year, Non-Classical is an honor presented to remixers for quality remixed recordings at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position".

The Grammy Award for Producer of the Year, Classical is an honor presented to record producers for quality classical music productions at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position".

The Grammy Award for Best Boxed or Special Limited Edition Package has been presented since 1995 to an album's art directors. The award is not bestowed upon or shared by the artist unless they are also a credited art director.

The Grammy Award for Best Rap Solo Performance was awarded from 1991 to 2011, alongside the Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group. Previously, a single award was presented for Best Rap Performance.

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