Michael Gore

Last updated
Michael Gore
Born (1951-03-05) March 5, 1951 (age 68)
Brooklyn, New York, U.S.
Genres Film score
Occupation(s) Composer
Years active1980 - 2003

Michael Gore (born March 5, 1951) is an American composer. Gore is the younger brother of the late singer/songwriter Lesley Gore.

Lesley Gore American female singer

Lesley Sue Goldstein, known professionally as Lesley Gore, was an American singer, songwriter, actress, and activist. At the age of 16 she recorded the pop hit "It's My Party", and followed it up with other hits including "Judy's Turn to Cry", "She's a Fool", "You Don't Own Me", "Maybe I Know" and "California Nights".

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Biography

A 1969 graduate of the Dwight-Englewood School, Gore received the school's Distinguished Alumni Award in 2004. [1]

Dwight-Englewood School

The Dwight–Englewood School (D-E) is an independent coeducational college-preparatory day school, located in Englewood, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. The school teaches students from pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade in three functionally separate schools. The Lower School serves students in pre-kindergarten through 5th grade in Drapkin Hall. The Middle School, in Umpleby Hall, serves students in grades 6-8. The Upper School serves grades 9-12, and it houses its administration in the Leggett building and the Klein Campus center. Other buildings are the Hajjar STEM Center, Swartley Arts Center, the Imperatore Library, and the Modell Sports Complex.

Gore, along with lyricist Dean Pitchford, won the Oscar in 1981 for best original song for "Fame", from the film of the same title. He also won the award that year for best original score. [2]

Dean Pitchford is an American songwriter, screenwriter, director, actor, and novelist. His work has earned him an Oscar and a Golden Globe Award, as well as nominations for three additional Oscars, two more Golden Globes, eight Grammy Awards, and two Tony Awards.

The Academy Award for Best Original Song is one of the awards given annually to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). It is presented to the songwriters who have composed the best original song written specifically for a film. The performers of a song are not credited with the Academy Award unless they contributed either to music, lyrics or both in their own right. The songs that are nominated for this award are performed during the ceremony and before this award is presented.

Fame (Irene Cara song) 1980 Irene Cara song

"Fame" is a pop song, written by Michael Gore (music) and Dean Pitchford (lyrics) and released in 1980, that achieved chart success as the theme song to the Fame film and TV series. The song was performed by Irene Cara, who played the role of Coco Hernandez in the original movie. It won the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1980, and the Golden Globe Award the same year. In 2004 it finished at number 51 on AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema.

Gore wrote the music for the notorious Broadway flop Carrie: The Musical . Two of his songs, with lyrics by Lynn Ahrens, were featured in the 2003 movie Camp . [3]

<i>Carrie</i> (musical) musical

Carrie: The Musical is a musical with a book by Lawrence D. Cohen, lyrics by Dean Pitchford, and music by Michael Gore. Adapted from Stephen King's novel Carrie, it focuses on an awkward teenage girl with telekinetic powers whose lonely life is dominated by an oppressive religious fanatic mother. When she is humiliated by her classmates at the high school prom, she unleashes chaos on everyone and everything in her path.

Lynn Ahrens is an American writer and lyricist for the musical theatre, television and film. She has collaborated with Stephen Flaherty for many years. She won the Tony Award, Drama Desk Award, and Outer Critics Circle Award for the Broadway musical Ragtime. Together with Flaherty, they have written many musicals, including Lucky Stiff, My Favorite Year, Ragtime, Seussical, A Man of No Importance, Dessa Rose, The Glorious Ones, Rocky, Little Dancer and, recently on Broadway, Anastasia and Once on This Island.

<i>Camp</i> (2003 film) 2003 film by Todd Graff

Camp is a 2003 American musical comedy-drama film, written and directed by Todd Graff, about an upstate New York performing arts summer camp. The film is based on Graff's own experiences at a similar camp called Stagedoor Manor, where many scenes of the movie were filmed.

He also composed the theme and score for the 1983 hit film Terms of Endearment , starring Shirley MacLaine and Debra Winger, notching a hit on the Adult Contemporary chart under his own name with the "Theme" from this film. The single for "Terms of Endearment" spent six weeks on the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at number 84 in April 1984. [4]

<i>Terms of Endearment</i> 1983 drama film directed by James L. Brooks

Terms of Endearment is a 1983 American comedy-drama film adapted from Larry McMurtry's 1975 novel, directed, written, and produced by James L. Brooks, and starring Shirley MacLaine, Debra Winger, Jack Nicholson, Danny DeVito, Jeff Daniels, and John Lithgow. The film covers 30 years of the relationship between Aurora Greenway (MacLaine) and her daughter Emma (Winger).

Shirley MacLaine American actress

Shirley MacLaine is an American film, television, and theater actress, singer, dancer, activist, and author. An Academy Award winner, MacLaine received the 40th AFI Life Achievement Award from the American Film Institute in 2012, and received the Kennedy Center Honors for her lifetime contributions to American culture through the performing arts in 2013. She is known for her New Age beliefs, and has an interest in spirituality and reincarnation. She has written a series of autobiographical works that describe these beliefs, document her world travels, and describe her Hollywood career.

Debra Winger American actress

Debra Lynn Winger is an American actress. She starred in the films An Officer and a Gentleman (1982), Terms of Endearment (1983), and Shadowlands (1993), each of which earned her a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Actress. She won the National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actress for Terms of Endearment, and the Tokyo International Film Festival Award for Best Actress for A Dangerous Woman (1993). Her other film roles include Urban Cowboy (1980), Legal Eagles (1986), Black Widow (1987), Betrayed (1988), Forget Paris (1995), and Rachel Getting Married (2008). In 2012, she made her Broadway debut in the original production of the David Mamet play The Anarchist. In 2014, she received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Transilvania International Film Festival.

Filmography

<i>Fame</i> (1980 film) 1980 film by Alan Parker

Fame is a 1980 American teen musical drama film directed by Alan Parker. Set in New York City, it chronicles the lives and hardships of students attending the High School of Performing Arts, from their auditions to their freshman, sophomore, junior and senior years.

<i>Pretty in Pink</i> 1986 film by Howard Deutch

Pretty in Pink is a 1986 American romantic comedy film about love and social cliques in American high schools in the 1980s. A cult classic, it is commonly identified as a "Brat Pack" film. It was directed by Howard Deutch, produced by Lauren Shuler Donner, and written by John Hughes, who also served as co-executive producer. It was named after the song by The Psychedelic Furs.

<i>Broadcast News</i> (film) 1987 film by James L. Brooks

Broadcast News is a 1987 American romantic comedy-drama film written, produced and directed by James L. Brooks. The film concerns a virtuoso television news producer, who has daily emotional breakdowns, a brilliant yet prickly reporter and his charismatic but far less seasoned rival. It also stars Robert Prosky, Lois Chiles, Joan Cusack, and Jack Nicholson as the evening news anchor.

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