Days of Wine and Roses (song)

Last updated
"Days of Wine and Roses"
Single by Andy Williams
from the album Days of Wine and Roses and Other TV Requests
A-side "Can't Get Used to Losing You"
Released March 1963
Genre Easy listening
Length2:45
Label Columbia 42674
Songwriter(s) Henry Mancini, Johnny Mercer
Producer(s) Robert Mersey
Andy Williams singles chronology
"Can't Get Used to Losing You"
(1963)
"Days of Wine and Roses"
(1963)
"Hopeless"
(1963)

"Days of Wine and Roses" is a popular song, from the 1962 movie of the same name. [1]

Popular music is music with wide appeal that is typically distributed to large audiences through the music industry. These forms and styles can be enjoyed and performed by people with little or no musical training. It stands in contrast to both art music and traditional or "folk" music. Art music was historically disseminated through the performances of written music, although since the beginning of the recording industry, it is also disseminated through recordings. Traditional music forms such as early blues songs or hymns were passed along orally, or to smaller, local audiences.

The year 1962 in film involved some very significant events, with Lawrence of Arabia the year's top-grossing film as well as winner of the Academy Award for Best Picture.

<i>Days of Wine and Roses</i> (film) 1962 film by Blake Edwards

Days of Wine and Roses is a 1962 drama film directed by Blake Edwards with a screenplay by JP Miller adapted from his own 1958 Playhouse 90 teleplay of the same name.

Contents

The music was written by Henry Mancini with lyrics by Johnny Mercer. [1] They received the Academy Award for Best Original Song for their work, [1] as well as the 1964 Grammy Award for Best Song of the Year. [2] In 2004 it finished at #39 in AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema.

Henry Mancini American composer, conductor and arranger

Henry Nicola Mancini was an American composer, conductor, arranger, pianist and flutist who is best remembered for his many film and television scores. Often cited as one of the greatest composers in the history of film, he won four Academy Awards, a Golden Globe, and twenty Grammy Awards, plus a posthumous Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1995.

Johnny Mercer American lyricist, songwriter, singer and music professional

John Herndon Mercer was an American lyricist, songwriter, and singer. He was also a record label executive who co-founded Capitol Records with music industry businessman Buddy DeSylva and Glenn E. Wallichs.

The Academy Award for Best Original Song is one of the awards given annually to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). It is presented to the songwriters who have composed the best original song written specifically for a film. The performers of a song are not credited with the Academy Award unless they contributed either to music, lyrics or both in their own right. The songs that are nominated for this award are performed during the ceremony and before this award is presented.

The song is composed of two sentences, one for each stanza. They are each sung as three lines.

Recordings

The best-known recordings of the song were by Billy Eckstine in 1961 and Andy Williams in 1963, but several other recording artists have also recorded the song, including Bill Evans, Dick and Dee Dee, Shirley Bassey, Frank Sinatra, Julie London, Perry Como, Wes Montgomery (1963: Boss Guitar), Robin Gibb and Lenny Breau. Tony Bennett sang his interpretation on his prestigious The Movie Song Album (1966). Ella Fitzgerald and Joe Pass recorded their version of this song on their Pablo Records album Easy Living . The song has become a jazz standard.

Billy Eckstine American musician

William Clarence Eckstine was an American jazz and pop singer, and a bandleader of the swing era. He was noted for his rich, resonant, almost operatic bass-baritone voice. Eckstine's recording of "I Apologize" was awarded the Grammy Hall of Fame Award in 1999. The New York Times described him as an "influential band leader" whose "suave bass-baritone" and "full-throated, sugary approach to popular songs inspired singers like Joe Williams, Arthur Prysock and Lou Rawls."

Andy Williams American recording artist; singer, songwriter, actor and record producer

Howard Andrew Williams was an American singer. He recorded 43 albums in his career, of which 15 have been gold-certified and three platinum-certified. He was also nominated for six Grammy Awards. He hosted The Andy Williams Show, a television variety show, from 1962 to 1971, and numerous TV specials. The Andy Williams Show won three Emmy awards. The Moon River Theatre in Branson, Missouri is named after the song for which he is best known—Johnny Mercer and Henry Mancini's "Moon River". He sold more than 100 million records worldwide, including more than 10 million certified units in the United States.

Bill Evans American jazz pianist

William John Evans was an American jazz pianist and composer who mostly played in trios. His use of impressionist harmony, inventive interpretation of traditional jazz repertoire, block chords, and trademark rhythmically independent, "singing" melodic lines continue to influence jazz pianists today.

Williams' version was recorded for Columbia Records. It was released as catalog number 42674. The song reached #9 on the adult contemporary chart and #26 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, [3] and was the featured track of an album by Williams of the same name, which peaked at #1 on the Billboard 200 album chart.

Columbia Records American record label; currently owned by Sony Music Entertainment

Columbia Records is an American record label owned by Sony Music Entertainment, a subsidiary of Sony Corporation of America, the North American division of Japanese conglomerate Sony. It was founded in 1887, evolving from the American Graphophone Company, the successor to the Volta Graphophone Company. Columbia is the oldest surviving brand name in the recorded sound business, and the second major company to produce records. From 1961 to 1990, Columbia recordings were released outside North America under the name CBS Records to avoid confusion with EMI's Columbia Graphophone Company. Columbia is one of Sony Music's four flagship record labels, alongside former longtime rival RCA Records, as well as Arista Records and Epic Records.

The Adult Contemporary chart is published weekly by Billboard magazine and lists the most popular songs on adult contemporary radio stations in the United States. The chart is compiled based on airplay data submitted to Billboard by stations that are members of the Adult Contemporary radio panel. The chart debuted in Billboard magazine on July 17, 1961. Over the years, the chart has gone under a series of name changes, being called Easy Listening(1961–1962; 1965–1979), Middle-Road Singles(1962–1964), Pop-Standard Singles(1964–1965), Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks(1979–1982) and Adult Contemporary(1983–present).

The Billboard Hot 100 is the music industry standard record chart in the United States for songs, published weekly by Billboard magazine. Chart rankings are based on sales, radio play, and online streaming in the United States.

Como's version was recorded for RCA Victor Records. The recording was made on March 19, 1963. The record was issued by RCA Victor as a track on the album, The Songs I Love. On the Cash Box chart, where all singles were combined together, the song reached a peak position of #30 in May 1963.

<i>The Songs I Love</i> (album) 1963 studio album by Perry Como

The Songs I Love was Perry Como's 11th RCA Victor 12" long-play album and the first featuring RCA Victor's Dynagroove technology.

Cash Box was a music industry trade magazine, originally published weekly from July 1942 to November 1996. Ten years after its dissolution it was revived and currently continues as Cashbox Magazine, an online magazine with weekly charts and occasional special print issues.

In 2000, The Lettermen covered the song on their Greatest Movie Hits album. R&B/soul singer Miki Howard recorded a cover version for her 2008 album, Private Collection . Robin Gibb's version was released posthumously as a track on the 2014 album, 50 St. Catherine's Drive .

The Lettermen American musical trio

The Lettermen are an American male pop vocal trio. The Lettermen's trademark is close-harmony pop songs with light arrangements. The group started in 1959. They have had two Top 10 singles, 16 Top 10 singles on the Adult Contemporary chart, 32 consecutive Billboard chart albums, 11 gold records, and five Grammy nominations.

Alicia Michelle "Miki" Howard is an American singer and actress who had a string of Top 10 hit songs in the mid–1980s and early–1990s, including "Baby, Be Mine"(1987), "Come Share My Love" (1986) and "Love Under New Management" (1990). "Ain't Nobody Like You" (1992) and "Ain't Nuthin' in the World" (1989) both peaked at number one on the U.S. Billboard Top R&B Singles chart.

Cover version later version of a song already established with a different earlier performer

In popular music, a cover version, cover song, revival, or simply cover, is a new performance or recording by someone other than the original artist or composer of a previously recorded, commercially released song.

The phrase "days of wine and roses" is originally from the poem "Vitae Summa Brevis" by the English writer Ernest Dowson (1867–1900):

They are not long, the days of wine and roses:
  Out of a misty dream
Our path emerges for a while, then closes
  Within a dream.

Chart positions

PerformerChart (1963)Peak
position
Andy Williams Adult contemporary9
Billboard Hot 10026
Henry Mancini Billboard Hot 10033
Billboard Easy Listening10

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 135. ISBN   1-904994-10-5.
  2. "Grammy Award Nominees 1964 – Grammy Award Winners 1964". Awardsandshows.com. Retrieved 10 August 2019.
  3. Andy Williams, "Days of Wine and Roses" chart positions Retrieved June 9, 2013