Unforgettable (Nat King Cole song)

Last updated
"Unforgettable"
Unforgettable - Nat King Cole.jpg
Single by Nat King Cole
from the album Unforgettable
ReleasedOctober 1951
Recorded1951
Genre
Length2:33
Label Capitol
Songwriter(s) Irving Gordon
Producer(s) Lee Gillette
Nat King Cole singles chronology
"Mona Lisa"
(1950)
"Unforgettable"
(1952)
"Pretend"
(1953)
Dinah Washington singles chronology
"What a Diff'rence a Day Made"
(1959)
"Unforgettable'"
(1959)
"Baby (You've Got What It Takes)"
(1960)

"Unforgettable" is a popular song written by Irving Gordon and produced by Lee Gillette. The song's original working title was "Uncomparable", however the music publishing company asked Gordon to change it to "Unforgettable". The song was published in 1951.

Irving Gordon American songwriter

Irving Gordon was an American songwriter.

Leland James Gillette, known professionally as Lee Gillette, was an American A&R director, record producer and musician.

Contents

Nat King Cole version

The most popular version of the song was recorded by Nat King Cole in 1951 from his album Unforgettable (1952), with an arrangement written by Nelson Riddle. [1] A non-orchestrated version of the song recorded in 1952 is featured as one of the seven bonus tracks on Cole's 1998 CD reissue of 1955's otherwise completely instrumental album, Penthouse Serenade . Cole recorded the tune anew in a stereo version of the Riddle arrangement, for the album The Nat King Cole Story (1961).

Nat King Cole American singer and jazz pianist

Nathaniel Adams Coles, known professionally as Nat King Cole, was an American jazz pianist and vocalist. He recorded over one hundred songs that became hits on the pop charts. His trio was the model for small jazz ensembles that followed. Cole also acted in films and on television and performed on Broadway. He was the first African American man to host an American television series.

<i>Unforgettable</i> (Nat King Cole album) original jazz compilation by Nat King Cole

Unforgettable is an original jazz compilation by Nat King Cole. It was initially released on a 10 inch LP in 1952, and it was reissued on a 12 inch LP in 1954.

Nelson Riddle American arranger, composer, bandleader and orchestrator

Nelson Smock Riddle Jr. was an American arranger, composer, bandleader and orchestrator whose career stretched from the late 1940s to the mid-1980s. His work for Capitol Records kept such vocalists as Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Nat King Cole, Judy Garland, Dean Martin, Peggy Lee, Johnny Mathis, Rosemary Clooney and Keely Smith household names. He found commercial and critical success again in the 1980s with a trio of Platinum albums with Linda Ronstadt. His orchestrations earned an Academy Award and three Grammy Awards.

In 1991, after Elvis Presley's musical director Joe Guercio had the idea, Cole's original 1951 recording of the song was edited and remixed to create a duet with his daughter, Natalie. The remixed version reached number 14 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and also number three on the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart. [2] The song also won three awards at the 34th Annual Grammy Awards (1992): Song of the Year, Record of the Year and Best Traditional Pop Vocal Performance. [3]

Elvis Presley American singer and actor

Elvis Aaron Presley was an American singer and actor. Regarded as one of the most significant cultural icons of the 20th century, he is often referred to as the "King of Rock and Roll" or simply "the King".

Natalie Cole American singer and songwriter

Natalie Maria Cole was an American singer, voice actress, songwriter, and actress. Cole was the daughter of American singer and jazz pianist Nat King Cole. She rose to success in the mid-1970s as an R&B singer with the hits "This Will Be", "Inseparable" (1975), and "Our Love" (1977). She returned as a pop singer on the 1987 album Everlasting and her cover of Bruce Springsteen's "Pink Cadillac". In the 1990s, she sang traditional pop by her father, resulting in her biggest success, Unforgettable... with Love, which sold over seven million copies and won her seven Grammy Awards. She sold over 30 million records worldwide. On December 31, 2015, Cole died at the age of 65 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California, due to congestive heart failure.

The Billboard charts tabulate the relative weekly popularity of songs and albums in the United States and elsewhere. The results are published in Billboard magazine. Billboard biz, the online extension of the Billboard charts, provides additional weekly charts. There are also Year End charts. The charts may be dedicated to specific genre such as R&B, country or rock, or they may cover all genres. The charts can be ranked according to sales, streams or airplay, and for main song charts such as the Hot 100 song chart, all three pools of data are used to compile the charts. For the Billboard 200 album chart, streams and track sales are included in addition to album sales.

Nat Cole's original recording was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2000. [4]

Chart history

Notable cover versions

American singer Natalie Cole released a cover of the song on her album Unforgettable... with Love (1991). The song, remixed as a "virtual duet" with her father, Nat King Cole, [11] reached number 3 on the US Adult Contemporary chart. [12] The performance of the song at the 1992 Grammy Awards was released on the 1994 album Grammy's Greatest Moments Volume I. [13]

<i>Unforgettable... with Love</i> 1991 studio album by Natalie Cole

Unforgettable... with Love, also known as simply Unforgettable, is a 1991 album by American singer Natalie Cole. Released on June 11, 1991, the album focuses on covers of standards previously performed by her father, Nat King Cole. It was also her debut for Elektra Records, after being given her release from EMI Records.

Semprini with Rhythm Acc. recorded it in London on March 26, 1952 as the third melody of the medley "Dancing to the piano (No. 14) - Part 1. Hit Medley of Foxtrots" along with "Slow Coach" and "Cry". It was released by EMI on the His Master's Voice label as catalog number B 10263.

"Slow Poke" is a 1951 popular song credited to three writers: Pee Wee King, Redd Stewart, and Chilton Price. Actually Price wrote the song in 1951, as she thought the song described her friend, King, very well. King recorded the song and Stewart did the vocal. Price gave rights to the other two in exchange for publicity, as she felt she knew nothing about the music distribution business. The song did so well commercially that when Price wrote the song "You Belong to Me" the next year, she felt she could do better by ceding partial credit for authorship to King and Stewart than trying to publicize the song herself, so that song as well was credited to King, Stewart, and Price, though Price was the sole author.

"Cry" is the title of a 1951 popular song written by Churchill Kohlman. The song was first recorded by Ruth Casey on the Cadillac label. The biggest hit version was recorded in New York City by Johnnie Ray and The Four Lads on October 16, 1951.

EMI British music recording and publishing company

EMI Group Limited was a British Transnational conglomerate founded in March 1931 in London. At the time of its break-up in 2012, it was the fourth largest business group and record label conglomerate in the music industry, and was one of the big four record companies ; its labels included EMI Records, Parlophone, Virgin Records, and Capitol Records, which are now owned by other companies.

Other cover versions were performed or recorded by:

Sampled by song

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References

  1. Nelson Riddle & Nat King Cole interviewed on the Pop Chronicles (1969)
  2. Whitburn, Joel (1993). Top Adult Contemporary: 1961–1993. Record Research. p. 54.
  3. Rock On The Net: 34th Annual Grammy Awards - 1992
  4. "GRAMMY Hall Of Fame". The GRAMMYs.
  5. "Item Display - RPM - Library and Archives Canada". Collectionscanada.gc.ca. 1990-06-27. Retrieved 2018-06-03.
  6. Joel Whitburn's Top Pop Singles 1955-1990 - ISBN   0-89820-089-X
  7. U.S. Cash Box Chart Entries - 1990 - 1996
  8. "End of Year Charts 1991". Recorded Music NZ. Retrieved December 3, 2017.
  9. Whitburn, Joel (1999). Pop Annual. Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin: Record Research Inc. ISBN   0-89820-142-X.
  10. Top Adult Contemporary Songs of 1991
  11. Maura, Johnston (January 1, 2016). "Natalie Cole: 10 Essential Songs". Rolling Stone . Retrieved April 22, 2018.
  12. Whitburn, Joel (1993). Top Adult Contemporary: 1961–1993. Record Research. p. 54.
  13. "Grammy's Greatest Moments, Volume 1: Various Artists". Amazon.com. Retrieved 2011-11-21.
  14. Spencer McCormick. "When Pigs Fly".
  15. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-10-19. Retrieved 2016-07-16.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)