34th Annual Grammy Awards

Last updated
34th Annual Grammy Awards
DateFebruary 25, 1992
Location Radio City Music Hall, New York City
Hosted by Whoopi Goldberg
Television/radio coverage
NetworkCBS

The 34th Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 25, 1992. [1] They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the previous year (1991). Natalie Cole was the big winner winning three awards including Album of the Year. [2] [3] Paul Simon opened the show.

Natalie Cole American singer and songwriter

Natalie Maria Cole was an American singer, voice actress, songwriter, and actress. Cole was the daughter of American singer and jazz pianist Nat King Cole. She rose to success in the mid-1970s as an R&B singer with the hits "This Will Be", "Inseparable" (1975), and "Our Love" (1977). She returned as a pop singer on the 1987 album Everlasting and her cover of Bruce Springsteen's "Pink Cadillac". In the 1990s, she sang traditional pop by her father, resulting in her biggest success, Unforgettable... with Love, which sold over seven million copies and won her seven Grammy Awards. She sold over 30 million records worldwide. On December 31, 2015, Cole died at the age of 65 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California, due to congestive heart failure.

The Grammy Award for Album of the Year is presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales, chart position, or critical reception." Album of the Year is the most prestigious award category at the Grammys having been presented since 1959.

Contents

Award winners

The Grammy Award for Record of the Year is presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to sales or chart position." The Record of the Year award is one of the four most prestigious categories at the awards presented annually since the 1st Grammy Awards in 1959. According to the 54th Grammy Awards description guide, the award is presented:

for commercially released singles or tracks of new vocal or instrumental recordings. Tracks from a previous year's album may be entered provided the track was not entered the previous year and provided the album did not win a Grammy. Award to the artist(s), producer(s), recording engineer(s) and/or mixer(s) if other than the artist.

David Foster Canadian musician, record producer, songwriter

David Walter Foster, OC, OBC, is a Canadian musician, record producer, composer, songwriter, and arranger. He has been a producer for musicians including Chaka Khan, Alice Cooper, Christina Aguilera, Andrea Bocelli, Toni Braxton, Michael Bublé, Chicago, Natalie Cole, Celine Dion, Kenny G, Josh Groban, Brandy Norwood, Whitney Houston, Jennifer Lopez, Kenny Rogers, Seal, Rod Stewart, Jake Zyrus, Donna Summer, Olivia Newton-John, Madonna, Mary J. Blige, Michael Jackson, Peter Cetera, Cheryl Lynn and Barbra Streisand. Foster has won 16 Grammy Awards from 47 nominations. He was the chairman of Verve Records from 2012 to 2016.

Unforgettable (Nat King Cole song) song written by Irving Gordon

"Unforgettable" is a popular song about nostalgia written by Irving Gordon and produced by Lee Gillette. The song's original working title was "Uncomparable", however the music publishing company asked Gordon to change it to "Unforgettable". The song was published in 1951.

Alternative

The Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Album is an award presented to recording artists for quality albums in the alternative genre at the Grammy Awards, a ceremony that was established in 1958 and originally called the Gramophone Awards. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to album sales or chart position".

R.E.M. American alternative rock band (1980–2011)

R.E.M. was an American rock band from Athens, Georgia, formed in 1980 by drummer Bill Berry, guitarist Peter Buck, bassist/backing vocalist Mike Mills, and lead vocalist Michael Stipe. One of the first alternative rock bands, R.E.M. was noted for Buck's ringing, arpeggiated guitar style, Stipe's distinctive vocal quality and obscure lyrics, Mills' melodic basslines and backing vocals, and Berry's tight, economical style of drumming. R.E.M. released its first single—"Radio Free Europe"—in 1981 on the independent record label Hib-Tone. The single was followed by the Chronic Town EP in 1982, the band's first release on I.R.S. Records. In 1983, the group released its critically acclaimed debut album, Murmur, and built its reputation over the next few years through subsequent releases, constant touring, and the support of college radio. Following years of underground success, R.E.M. achieved a mainstream hit in 1987 with the single "The One I Love". The group signed to Warner Bros. Records in 1988, and began to espouse political and environmental concerns while playing large arenas worldwide.

<i>Out of Time</i> (album) 1991 studio album by R.E.M.

Out of Time is the seventh studio album by American alternative rock band R.E.M., released on March 8, 1991 by Warner Bros. Records. With Out of Time, R.E.M.'s status grew from that of a cult band to a massive international act. The record topped the album sales charts in both the U.S. and the United Kingdom, spending 109 weeks on American album charts and enjoying two separate spells at the summit, and spending 183 weeks on the British charts and a single week at the top. The album has sold over four and a half million copies in the U.S. and over 18 million copies worldwide. The album won three Grammy Awards in 1992: one as Best Alternative Music Album, and two for the first single, "Losing My Religion."

Blues

Children's

Classical

Comedy

Composing and arranging

Country

Folk

Gospel

Historical

Jazz

Latin

Musical show

Music video

New Age

Packaging and notes

Polka

Pop

Production and engineering

R&B

Rap

Reggae

Rock

Spoken

Traditional pop

World

Special merit awards

MusiCares Person of the Year

Grammy Legend Award

Trivia

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References

  1. Pareles, Jon (26 February 1992). "Cole's 'Unforgettable' Sweeps the Grammys". The New York Times. Retrieved 26 September 2012.
  2. Campbell, Mary (26 February 1992). "Natalie Cole emotional favorite at Grammys". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved 1 May 2011.
  3. "1991 Grammy Award Winners". Grammy.com. Retrieved 1 May 2011.