35th Annual Grammy Awards

Last updated
35th Annual Grammy Awards
Grammy logo 1993 035.jpg
Official poster
DateFebruary 24, 1993
Location Shrine Auditorium
Hosted by Garry Shandling
Highlights
Most awards Eric Clapton (6)
Most nominations Eric Clapton (9)
Record YR. "Tears in Heaven"
Album YR. Unplugged
Song YR. "Tears in Heaven"
New Artist Arrested Development
Person YR. Natalie Cole
Website www.grammy.com
Television/radio coverage
Network CBS
Runtimecirca 150 minutes
Viewership30.0 million viewers [1]
Produced byMatt Sager · Tzvi Small [2]

The 35th Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 24, 1993 and recognized accomplishments by musicians from the previous year. [3] The nominations were announced on January 7, 1993. [4] The evening's host was the American stand-up comedian Garry Shandling, who hosted the ceremony for the third time. [5] The CBS network broadcast the show live from the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, California. [6]

Garry Shandling American stand-up comedian

Garry Emmanuel Shandling was an American stand-up comedian, actor, director, writer, and producer. He was best known for his work in It's Garry Shandling's Show and The Larry Sanders Show.

Shrine Auditorium large event venue in Los Angeles, California

The Shrine Auditorium is a landmark large-event venue in Los Angeles, California. It is also the headquarters of the Al Malaikah Temple, a division of the Shriners. It was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1975.

Contents

This particular Grammy live broadcast was the commercially most successful of its kind in the 1990s. [7] As Nielsen Media Research and Billboard magazine stated on January 10, 2004, "the highest-rated Grammy show of the 1990s was the 1993 telecast, which got a 19.9 rating/31 share and 30 million United States viewers" alone. [1] British guitarist and singer Eric Clapton was the night's big winner, winning six awards out of nine nominations including Album, Song and Record of the Year. [8]

Nielsen Media Research

Nielsen Media Research (NMR) is an American firm that measures media audiences, including television, radio, theatre films and newspapers. NMR, headquartered in New York City, is best known for the Nielsen ratings, an audience measurement system of television viewership that for years has been the deciding factor in canceling or renewing television shows by television networks. As of May 2012, it is part of Nielsen Holdings.

<i>Billboard</i> (magazine) American music magazine

Billboard is an American entertainment media brand owned by the Billboard-Hollywood Reporter Media Group, a division of Eldridge Industries. It publishes pieces involving news, video, opinion, reviews, events, and style, and is also known for its music charts, including the Hot 100 and Billboard 200, tracking the most popular songs and albums in different genres. It also hosts events, owns a publishing firm, and operates several TV shows.

Eric Clapton English musician, singer, songwriter, and guitarist

Eric Patrick Clapton, is an English rock and blues guitarist, singer, and songwriter. He is the only three-time inductee to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: once as a solo artist and separately as a member of the Yardbirds and of Cream. Clapton has been referred to as one of the most important and influential guitarists of all time. Clapton ranked second in Rolling Stone magazine's list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time" and fourth in Gibson's "Top 50 Guitarists of All Time". He was also named number five in Time magazine's list of "The 10 Best Electric Guitar Players" in 2009.

Michael Jackson, having been recently interviewed in Oprah Winfrey Show had received the Grammy Legend Award from his sister Janet Jackson, for whom she won Best R&B song for her single That's the Way Loves Go. A small segment of the show was "How to Become a Legend" narrated by Janet. [9]

Michael Jackson American singer, songwriter and dancer

Michael Joseph Jackson was an American singer, songwriter, and dancer. Dubbed the "King of Pop", he is widely regarded as one of the most significant cultural figures of the 20th century and one of the greatest entertainers of all time. He was also known for his unorthodox lifestyle, residing in a private amusement park he called Neverland Ranch, and often becoming the focus of tabloid scrutiny. Jackson's contributions to music, dance, and fashion, along with his publicized personal life, made him a global figure in popular culture for over four decades.

The Grammy Legend Award, or the Grammy Living Legend Award, is a special award of merit given to recording artists by the Grammy Awards, a music awards ceremony that was established in 1958. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States for outstanding achievements in the music industry.

Janet Jackson American singer, songwriter, actress, and dancer.

Janet Damita Jo Jackson is an American singer, songwriter, actress, and dancer. A prominent figure in popular culture, she is known for sonically innovative, socially conscious and sexually provocative records, and elaborate stage shows.

A total of twelve live performances where held at the ceremony, including the opener "Steam" by Peter Gabriel, "Constant Craving" by k. d. lang, "Give It Away" by the Red Hot Chili Peppers with George Clinton and P-Funk, "Save the Best for Last" by Vanessa Williams, "My Lovin' (You're Never Gonna Get It)" by En Vogue, "The Lady Is a Tramp" by Tony Bennett and Natalie Cole, "The Whiskey Ain't Workin'" by Travis Tritt and Marty Stuart, "People Everyday" by Arrested Development, "Achy Breaky Heart" by Billy Ray Cyrus, "Hallelujah!" by Mervyn Warren and Los Angeles Master Chorale, "Beauty and the Beast" by Celine Dion and Peabo Bryson as well as "Cherokee" by Arturo Sandoval featuring the GRP All-Stars Ensemble and Clapton's "Tears in Heaven". [10]

Constant Craving single

"Constant Craving" is a song written by k.d. lang and Ben Mink, and performed by k.d. lang on her album Ingénue. The song first made the charts in 1992, and won her the Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance in 1993 and an MTV Video Music Award for Best Female Video.

Give It Away (Red Hot Chili Peppers song) Red Hot Chili Peppers song

"Give It Away" is a song by American rock band Red Hot Chili Peppers from the group's fifth studio album, Blood Sugar Sex Magik. It was released as the lead single from their album on September 4, 1991, by Warner Bros. Records. The music was written by guitarist John Frusciante and bassist Flea during a jam session months prior to the album recording sessions. Vocalist Anthony Kiedis wrote the song's most prevalent lyrical refrain in response to an experience he shared with former girlfriend Nina Hagen regarding altruistic behavior and the value of selflessness.

Red Hot Chili Peppers American rock band

Red Hot Chili Peppers are an American rock band formed in Los Angeles in 1983. The group's musical style primarily consists of rock with an emphasis on funk, as well as elements from other genres such as punk rock and psychedelic rock. When played live, their music incorporates elements of jam band due to the improvised nature of many of their performances. Currently, the band consists of founding members vocalist Anthony Kiedis and bassist Flea, longtime drummer Chad Smith, and former touring guitarist Josh Klinghoffer. Red Hot Chili Peppers are one of the best-selling bands of all time with over 80 million records sold worldwide, they have been nominated for sixteen Grammy Awards, of which they have won six, and are the most successful band in alternative rock radio history, currently holding the records for most number-one singles (13), most cumulative weeks at number one (85) and most top-ten songs (25) on the Billboard Alternative Songs chart. In 2012, they were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

At the 45th Primetime Emmy Awards in 1993, the production mixers Ed Greene, Rick Himot, Don Worsham, David Hewitt and Paul Sandweiss were nominated for Outstanding Individual Achievement in Sound Mixing for a Variety or Music Series or a Special, losing to Star Trek: The Next Generation . [11]

45th Primetime Emmy Awards

The 45th Primetime Emmy Awards were held on Sunday, September 19, 1993. The ceremony was broadcast on ABC and was hosted by Angela Lansbury. MTV received its first major nomination at this ceremony.

The Primetime Emmy Award is an American award bestowed by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (ATAS) in recognition of excellence in American primetime television programming. First given out in 1949, the award was originally referred to as simply the "Emmy Awards" until the first Daytime Emmy Award ceremony was held in 1974 and the word "prime time" was added to distinguish between the two.

<i>Star Trek: The Next Generation</i> American television series

Star Trek: The Next Generation is an American science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry. It originally aired from September 28, 1987 to May 23, 1994 on syndication, spanning 178 episodes over the course of seven seasons. The third series in the Star Trek franchise, it is the second sequel to Star Trek: The Original Series. Set in the 24th century, when Earth is part of a United Federation of Planets, it follows the adventures of a Starfleet starship, the USS Enterprise-D, in its exploration of the Milky Way galaxy.

Award winners

The Grammy Award for Record of the Year is presented by the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences of the United States to "honor artistic achievement, technical proficiency and overall excellence in the recording industry, without regard to sales or chart position." The Record of the Year award is one of the four most prestigious categories at the awards presented annually since the 1st Grammy Awards in 1959. According to the 54th Grammy Awards description guide, the award is presented:

for commercially released singles or tracks of new vocal or instrumental recordings. Tracks from a previous year's album may be entered provided the track was not entered the previous year and provided the album did not win a Grammy. Award to the artist(s), producer(s), recording engineer(s) and/or mixer(s) if other than the artist.

Russ Titelman is an American record producer and songwriter. He has to date won three Grammy Awards. He earned his first producing the Steve Winwood song "Higher Love", and his second and third for Eric Clapton's Journeyman and Unplugged albums, respectively. Titelman also produced Clapton's 24 Nights live album of 1990 and the all-blues album From the Cradle, released in 1994.

Tears in Heaven song by Eric Clapton and Will Jennings

"Tears in Heaven" is a song by Eric Clapton and Will Jennings. Its lyrics were inspired by the death of Clapton's four-year-old son, Conor, who fell from a New York apartment building on March 20, 1991. It appeared on the 1991 Rush film soundtrack.

Alternative

Blues

Children's

Classical

Comedy

Composing and arranging

Country

Folk

Gospel

Historical

Jazz

Latin

Musical show

Music video

New Age

Packaging and notes

Polka

Pop

Production and engineering

R&B

Rap

Reggae

Rock

Spoken

Traditional pop

World

Special merit awards

MusiCares Person of the Year

Related Research Articles

The 20th Annual Grammy Awards were held February 23, 1978, and were broadcast live on American television. They were hosted by folk music legend John Denver, and recognized accomplishments by musicians from the year 1977.

The 19th Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 19, 1977, and were broadcast live on American television (CBS). They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the year 1976.

The 22nd Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 27, 1980, at Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles, and were broadcast live on American television. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the year 1979. This year was notable for being the first year to have a designated category for Rock music.

The 16th Annual Grammy Awards were held March 2, 1974, and were broadcast live on American television. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the year 1973.

The 15th Annual Grammy Awards were held on March 3, 1973, and were the first to be broadcast live on CBS, after the first two ceremonies were on ABC. CBS has been the TV home for the Grammy Awards ever since. The awards recognized accomplishments by musicians from the year 1972. The ceremony this year was held in Nashville, Tennessee; others before or since have been held in either New York City or Los Angeles.

The 14th Annual Grammy Awards were held March 14, 1972, and were broadcast live on television in the United States by ABC; the following year, they would move the telecasts to CBS, where they remain to this date. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the year 1971.

The 37th Annual Grammy Awards were presented on March 1, 1995, at Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the previous year. Bruce Springsteen was the night's biggest winner with 4 awards, including Song of the Year while opening the show with his Grammy nominated hit.

The 28th Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 25, 1986, at Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the previous year, 1985.

The 25th Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 23, 1983, at Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the previous year.

The 27th Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 26, 1985, at Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles, and were broadcast live on American television. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the year 1984.

41st Annual Grammy Awards award ceremony

The 41st Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 24, 1999, at Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the year 1998. Lauryn Hill was the main recipient, winning a total of 5 awards including Album of the Year and Best New Artist. Her album was the first Hip Hop act ever to win the coveted award. The ceremony was known as the "Grammy Year of Women", because every artist nominated for Album of the Year was female. Madonna won four awards and opened the show with her performance of "Nothing Really Matters" while musicians the Dixie Chicks, Vince Gill, Alanis Morissette & Shania Twain won two apiece. Celine Dion also received two awards both for "My Heart Will Go On", which received a total of four awards. It is widely remembered for Ricky Martin's performance of "La Copa De La Vida"/ "The Cup of Life".

The 11th Annual Grammy Awards were held on March 12, 1969. They recognized accomplishments of musicians for the year 1968.

The 26th Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 28, 1984, at Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles, and were broadcast live on American television. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the year 1983. Michael Jackson who had been recovering from scalp burns sustained due to an accident which occurred during filming of a Pepsi commercial, won a record eight awards during the show. It is notable for garnering the largest Grammy Award television audience ever.

The 36th Annual Grammy Awards were held in 1994. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the previous year. Whitney Houston was the Big Winner winning 3 awards including Record of the Year and Album of the Year while opening the show with "I Will Always Love You".

The 39th Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 26, 1997, at Madison Square Garden, New York City. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the previous year. Babyface was the night's biggest winner, with 4 awards. Celine Dion and Toni Braxton won two awards. Celine Dion for "Best Pop Album" and "Album of the Year" and Toni Braxton for "Best Female R&B Vocal Performance" and "Best Female Pop Vocal Performance". The show was hosted by Ellen Degeneres who also performed the opening with Shawn Colvin, Bonnie Rait, and Chaka Khan.

The 31st Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 22, 1989, at Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the previous year.

The 34th Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 25, 1992. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the previous year (1991). Natalie Cole was the big winner winning three awards including Album of the Year. Paul Simon opened the show.

The 29th Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 24, 1987, at Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles, California. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the previous year.

The 33rd Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 20, 1991. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the previous year. Quincy Jones was the night's biggest winner winning a total of six awards including Album of the Year.

The 30th Annual Grammy Awards were held March 2, 1988, at Radio City Music Hall, New York City. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the previous year.

References

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  2. "35th Annual Grammy Awards Production Credits". The Recording Academy. Direct Upload. Retrieved 23 April 2017.
  3. "35th Annual GRAMMY Awards | GRAMMY.com". Grammy Awards. The Recording Academy. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  4. "1993 Grammy Nominations". The Baltimore Sun . Light For All, LLC. January 8, 1993. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  5. Stedman, Alex (March 24, 2016). "Garry Shandling Dies at 66". Variety.com . Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  6. "1993 Grammy Winners". The New York Times . The New York Times Company. February 26, 1993. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  7. "GRAMMY Rewind: 35th Annual GRAMMY Awards". The Grammys. The Recording Academy. 26 January 2012. Retrieved 23 April 2017.
  8. "Clapton awarded 6 Grammys including best song, album". The Milwaukee Sentinel. Google News. February 25, 1993. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  9. "Lifetime Achievement Award | GRAMMY.com". Grammy Awards. The Recording Academy. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  10. Todd Everett (February 24, 1993). "35th Annual Grammy Awards". Variety . Penske Business Media, LLC. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  11. "Nominees/Winners". The Television Academy. The Emmys. Retrieved 23 April 2017.